HOW TO BECOME A CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST

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    I AM INTERESTED IN BECOMING A CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST. WHAT KIND OF EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE DO YOU NEED. DO YOU HAVE TO HAVE A MASTERS OR A BSN, HOW LONG IS THE TRAINING, AND CAN YOU SPECIALISE.. THANKS FOR ANSWERING, EMMA
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    Clinical nurse specialists, by definition hold a Master of Science degree in NURSING [versus a master's in something else], are prepared in a clinical specialty which includes a clinical practicum. Clinical Nurse Specialists specialize in various nursing areas, including, Gerontology, adult health, etc.

    Of course prior to the MSN, you need a BSN. Clinical Nurse Specialists are then [or, at least should be] certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center {A.N.C.C.}. Their web- site gives the criteria necessary for certification as a C.N.S. Go to: http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/index.htm
    and you can look up the criteria.

    I work with several C.N.S.'s and they are great. Good luck with your studies. I hope this helps.
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    I worked with a wonderful CNS during my Labor and Delivery clinical rotation. She still worked at the bedside. Is this typical or are there other ways one could apply a CNS? Also, while my interests are far from motivated soley by pay, I am curious as to what type of salary accompanies this type of advanced degree. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks!
    Shannon



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    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it."-Johan Ruskin
  6. 0
    Many Clinical Nurse Specialists continue to work at the bedside. Because of their advanced clinical knowledge and skills, they are excellent practitioners. C.N.S.'s also are often found in nursing managerial roles. Clinical Nurse Specialists [also termed 'clin-specs'] have a broad array of applications because their scope of practice encompasses the roles of Administrator, Educator, Consultant, Researcher as well as Direct care provider. The major difference between CNS and the N.P. is prescriptive privilege [which, in my estimation has become the 'tail that wags the dog', but we won't get into that here!].

    Unfortunately, C.N.S.'s are grossly underutilized. They offer a wealth of knowledge and experience that can contribute significantly to provision of care and services to all populations. Barriers to their use include administrations that are too stupid and cheap [and I can get away with saying that!] to use them, and lack of financial incentives for C.N.S.'s to work in various institutions. Just look at some of the comments posted on this site... some nurses are of the opinion that all nurses should make the same amount of money regardless of degree! Regardless of what anyone says, there is a difference between a generalist nurse and a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    So, that is the C.N.S. story. It's a role I highly recommend and support.
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    I,too, am going to start grad. work toward CNS in the field of oncology. Wanted to do it for many years, and clin specs. were slowly be faded out and replaced with NPs.
    I can see this role being multifaceted and a tremendous asset to a specialty. Our NPs are wonderful and highly skilled. My goal is to combine administration and education with this as well....My best to you in your endeavors!!! Just shows, history of nursing roles keeps going around and around...thank heavens...Good Luck!


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