How am I supposed to get experience if no one will hire me?

  1. 1 I am a new graduate and can't get a job because 100% of the jobs require that I have 1-2 years of experience.

    How am I supposed to get experience if no one will hire me? I have bills to pay and I am losing money each month getting further and further in debt. Each month not working adds up.

    I'm watching CNN right now and they just said RNs will be the fastest growing job market in the next coming up years? Are they kidding? CNN also said the unemployment rate for people with bachelors is 4.7%?
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    Visit  Seagate profile page

    About Seagate

    Joined Jun '08; Posts: 85; Likes: 20.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  lpningeorgia profile page
    0
    I totally understand where you are coming from. I graduated from lpn school in 2007, and here we are one month into leaving 2009, and I still can't land a job due to lack of experience. To make matters worse, I can't relocate to another state because I need 500 paid clinical hours before I can get endorsement. My loan amount keeps getting higher and higher, and I feel like I went to nursing school for nothing. You are not by yourself.
  4. Visit  NewTexasRN profile page
    0
    Quote from lpningeorgia
    I totally understand where you are coming from. I graduated from lpn school in 2007, and here we are one month into leaving 2009, and I still can't land a job due to lack of experience. To make matters worse, I can't relocate to another state because I need 500 paid clinical hours before I can get endorsement. My loan amount keeps getting higher and higher, and I feel like I went to nursing school for nothing. You are not by yourself.

    I don't understand why do you need 500 clinical hours before you can get endorsement? It is because you graduated in 2007?
  5. Visit  NewTexasRN profile page
    0
    Can you relocate?
  6. Visit  LaneyB profile page
    0
    I am sorry to hear this - how frustrating.

    Do any hospitals in your area have a nurse extern program? We have some hospitals here in Michigan that will hire you at full RN pay, and you work different floors for a certain amount of time (not sure how long), then you pick among the job openings in the hospital after you are done rotating. Of course, job openings are not as plentiful as they once were, so they probably aren't hiring as many externs.
  7. Visit  lpningeorgia profile page
    0
    500 paid clinical hours is part of the endorsement requirement for the state of Georgia. If you move without completing that requirement you have to sit for the boards all over again. I thought fulfilling this requirement would be pretty easy considering it's only 3 months of work, but since no one will hire me I don't think I will relocating any time soon. I feel like I went to school for nothing. I'm still working at the same place I was working when I began the lpn program. Now I'm stuck in NJ just hoping someone will call. Had I known this information in the beginning I would've moved first and then went to school in the state where I planned to live. A word of advice to any and everyone who wants to relocate to another state: please find out all of the endorsement requirements before you begin a nursing program or you may find yourself in the same situation as myself. It's sad because when I graduated I already had my bags packed thinking I could just pay the endorsement fee and move; I was so wrong. You don't know how I wish clinical hours in school counted, but they don't.
  8. Visit  lpningeorgia profile page
    0
    I'm scared to death of entering an RN program. I already owe 17,000 for the lpn and it's been almost 3 years since I finished. I don't want to run into the same situation of not being able to find work once I'm done with the RN.
  9. Visit  Emergency RN profile page
    2
    Quote from lpningeorgia
    I'm scared to death of entering an RN program. I already owe 17,000 for the lpn and it's been almost 3 years since I finished. I don't want to run into the same situation of not being able to find work once I'm done with the RN.
    If you're already working as an LPN, then you already have a leg up on other new grads. If you're a bedside nurse (LPN or RN) for 3 years, then you already have the experience that they're looking for.

    The problem with new grads and experience is that most nursing schools only allow the student to focus on one or two patients at a time. Whilst this may be critical for the academic arena, it certainly is not what you'll find in the real world. A hospital setting requires nurses to be able to take anywhere from 4-8 patients (depending on your state and hospital) and double that if you're relieving someone else who goes on break. So the question becomes, can you take care of up to 16 patients if you suddenly had to, but at a minimum, an average of 8? Most new nurses would be lost unless they had a real good orientation program, which costs lots of money. Most structured orientation plans for new grads have disappeared entirely. I remember the place where I work used to have a 3 month orientation, which over time, was trimmed to 3 weeks, and further cut to 3 days. Ergo, new hires are expected to hit the ground running and no one is going to be there to hold their hand.

    Additionally, nurses with 2-3 years experience are the most cost effective insofar as an employer is concerned. They're generally the lowest paid (as they have the least experience) but have just enough knowledge to stay out of trouble. They'll know to call the doctor if there is a problem, and won't be fumbling around by the bedside and worrying their patients. Thus, for a new grad to break into a hospital these days, is almost impossible.

    For the new grad, my suggestion is to look for work with the hospital that you trained in. If anything, you're at least familiar with the physical layout, and know the general flow of things. If you left a good impression while you were a student there, it may influence the staff to support your attempt at employment. Another avenue is to volunteer. While you won't get paid, it will again, allow you to get to know people and, over time, get them on your side. At least this would be a leg up on all the other new grads who don't know anyone there at all.

    And finally, good luck to all the new nurses out there. Regardless of the dismal employment situation for new grads, I for one, am gratified that there are others in the pipeline ready to fill our shoes as us old timers punch out. So don't lose heart; we most certainly need you. Please don't ever forget that.
    aquarius04 and Ivanna_Nurse like this.
  10. Visit  BmoreCRNP profile page
    0
    I had the same problem when I first started in 1996. There were hiring freezes in many hospitals in NYC at the time. Some hospitals that were hiring new grads didn't want RNs with AS degrees! I didn't find a job until 1 1/2 years after graduating, and it was with an agency! I had about 2 days of orientation and was thrown right into the fire, working in Telemetry, Med-Surg, and Oncology. It was HORRIBLE!! I almost killed a few people (in my mind I thought I did at least). I remember shutting off someone's Heparin, forgetting to get a PT/PTT, and forgetting that the Heparin was off. A diabetic patient was extremely hyperglycemic, and I forgot to tell the doc so that something could be done about it. I was afraid to tell the other nurses because I thought they'd think I was stupid. I have a few more stories, but I'll spare you the gory details. I said all that to say that even though it's difficult to find a job, and you're really desperate to get out there and get experience, it's best to wait for the appropriate opportunity. Don't jump into something because it's the first and only job you've been offered. If someone is trying to throw you into the ICU or ER with only 2-3 weeks of orientation as a new grad, RUN LIKE HELL!!! You also don't want to be too picky. If your dream job is OB but the ER is hiring and they're giving a good orientation, take it. Try to transition to your "dream job" after getting your foot in the door somewhere. Okay let stop typing, carry on!
  11. Visit  morningland profile page
    0
    Yep, here in michigan their are job freezes as well. Most people are shocked when I tell them because they say "nursing is in demand" but the fail to realize that the economy is hitting hospitals hard. I talked with nurses at my clinical that say that are only working 20hrs a week and even then, they can get sent home if things are slow. So sometimes they only work 14 hrs a week. Lets see, if you were making 25/hr, thats only 350 a week!!! Not a very lucritive job.
  12. Visit  SteffersRN87 profile page
    0
    Everyone, calm down!

    With this horrible economy and rising health care costs, hospitals have very little funds to support a new grad on orientation. I work in Pittsburgh, PA and our unit manager is only hiring RN's with at least one year of telemetry/ICU or oncology experience (for a short stay unit) plus the new hire must be able to test out of either dysrhythmia class or oncology/chemo class. Budgets are very tight! Typically, in a telemetry setting, new grads should have at least 8 to 12 weeks of orientation. That means, that for 8 to 12 weeks, a hospital is paying 2 nurses to take care of one patient assignment plus any needed classes.

    There is a national nursing shortage that is only going to get worse because of the aging nursing population!

    My advice to all of you is to utilize this "down time" wisely! Look into long-term care or rehab facilities. It is experience and it counts! And, I cannot emphasize enough - APPLY APPLY APPLY! If you meet the qualifications, apply!
  13. Visit  rick.s.lpn profile page
    0
    I can relate to your situation also. I live in the Tampa bay area and just got my lpn license in October , 2009 and am running into the same problem you are . Almost all the lpn job postings want 1-2yrs experience . I have had 2 offers , one night shift w/very little orientation ,(the DON said 3-4 days to learn the paperwork and then that she would start me the following weekend 7p-7a, and they didn't have a night unit manager , so i got scared out of that plus i hate night shift anyway .I have been told it is better to start on days so you can learn and also have more support. The other job offering was a temp job administering H1N1 vacinations at area schools for $14 an hr flat rate with no benefits .( i make 13.50 as an cna ), so i turned it down. I don't know what to do , but the bank account is gettin low and i am actually contemplating looking for cna work or almost anything just to make ends meet.Heck ,i might even try to get the H1N1 gig out of desperation ! Well , good luck to you . I hope you and i and all the the other new grads out there get something worth accepting !!!
  14. Visit  Seagate profile page
    0
    Laney, I'm in MI also. Can you please contact me with information on which hospitals have the nurse extern program? I contacted Henry Ford Hospital and applied for nurse extern but they told me I can't be in it because I am a nurse already.


    Quote from LaneyB
    I am sorry to hear this - how frustrating.

    Do any hospitals in your area have a nurse extern program? We have some hospitals here in Michigan that will hire you at full RN pay, and you work different floors for a certain amount of time (not sure how long), then you pick among the job openings in the hospital after you are done rotating. Of course, job openings are not as plentiful as they once were, so they probably aren't hiring as many externs.


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