Hiring new grads over experienced nurses-VENT

  1. So I am really TICKED off right now. I recently (4 months ago) left a job that I had been at 4 over 6 years to go work at a new hospital. I was working in Labor and Delivery but had always wanted to be a NICU nurse and the hospital that I worked at only had a small NICU that won't train nurses without experience in a NICU. I decided to go work at the Children's hospital in town to get my experience. When I applied they had just filled there new training program for NICU but would be starting a new one in 6 months. I decided to take a job on the general Peds floor to get my foot in the door with the company and then apply for the next NICU training program. So here I am 5 months later. I interviewed for the NICU program in October and was told I would hear back by the begining of November. Never heard back from anyone. Today I finally got a hold of someone and was told I was not being offered the job. The thing that gets me as that they filled at least a few of the 7 open positions with NEW GRADS. Not that there is anything wrong with new grads but I have over 6 years of nursing experience, I have worked in a Newborn nursery, I was a charge nurse at my last job plus I am already working within the hospital and they took NEW GRADS over me. I just don't get it!!!!
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   llg
    Perhaps you should have a talk with someone who can give you some honest feedback on why you were not selected for the program. There may be factors involved that you had not considered. For example, they might not have liked the fact that you wanted to switch units so soon after being oriented to the general peds floor. That might appear to be "job hopping" and give the impression that you are a "poor risk" for sticking with the job after they invest in your orientation. They might be very willing to hire you after you have spent a certain amount of time on the general peds floor to "pay them back" for having invested in your orientation. Some hospitals even have formal policies against transferring to another unit before working on your current unit for at least 6 months.

    There may be other reasons as well ... but the one I mentioned above is the first one I thought of. You'll never know until you actually talk with someone who knows and give them a chance to explain it to you.

    Let us know what they say,
    llg
  4. by   km5v6r
    I feel your pain. I began to wonder this spring when I was looking for a new job where exactly the nursing shortage was occurring. Everyone hears about "eating our young" but no one talks about "throwing away our experience". One interviewer even admitted that from their perspective the only difference between someone with 5 years of experience someone with 25 years was starting salary. Guess which was more important to them.

    How short staffed is the unit you currently work on? I have had managers try to obstruct a transfer because I was capable, never called in, and knew the job. Letting me leave ment they had to find and train a replacement. Shouldn't have been my problem but they tried to make it one. The unacknowledged price of doing a good job.:angryfire

    I have also heard some managers and education people state a preference for new grads. They viewed new grads as a "blank slates that can be trained correctly". Experienced nurses had to "unlearn bad habits" and came with "preconceived ideas". In other words a brain and the confidence and skills to use it.:angryfire

    Good Luck
  5. by   angel337
    it doesn't surprise me. i have several friends that are experienced nurses with 10 years or more to account for and they have experienced the same thing. some institutions don't value knowledge and would rather save a buck or two. i see the nursing shortage taking an ugly turn in the next 5 years. most of the new grads that have been hired where i work do not stay. they usually get one year experience and try to move on to the m-f, no weekend, no holiday job. i am not generalizing but just just sharing the trend that i have seen where i work. its sad because i know when i was a new grad i LOVED the experienced nurses. they made me who i am.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from llg
    Perhaps you should have a talk with someone who can give you some honest feedback on why you were not selected for the program. There may be factors involved that you had not considered. For example, they might not have liked the fact that you wanted to switch units so soon after being oriented to the general peds floor. That might appear to be "job hopping" and give the impression that you are a "poor risk" for sticking with the job after they invest in your orientation. They might be very willing to hire you after you have spent a certain amount of time on the general peds floor to "pay them back" for having invested in your orientation. Some hospitals even have formal policies against transferring to another unit before working on your current unit for at least 6 months.

    There may be other reasons as well ... but the one I mentioned above is the first one I thought of. You'll never know until you actually talk with someone who knows and give them a chance to explain it to you.

    Let us know what they say,
    llg
    This is really sage and sound advice. Do not jump to conclusions; get the real information from the source before making any assumptions.
  7. by   nurseMeghan
    Quote from llg
    Perhaps you should have a talk with someone who can give you some honest feedback on why you were not selected for the program. There may be factors involved that you had not considered. For example, they might not have liked the fact that you wanted to switch units so soon after being oriented to the general peds floor. That might appear to be "job hopping" and give the impression that you are a "poor risk" for sticking with the job after they invest in your orientation. They might be very willing to hire you after you have spent a certain amount of time on the general peds floor to "pay them back" for having invested in your orientation. Some hospitals even have formal policies against transferring to another unit before working on your current unit for at least 6 months.

    There may be other reasons as well ... but the one I mentioned above is the first one I thought of. You'll never know until you actually talk with someone who knows and give them a chance to explain it to you.

    Let us know what they say,
    llg

    Actually by the time this new program starts I will have been there for almost 8 months. I left a message with the lady that I interviewed with to see if I could speak with her. I'm not really expecting an answer since I had left several messages with her over the last few weeks trying to find out about the job. She never once got back to me. I finally got an answer from the nurse recuiter yesterday and that is how I found out that I didn't get the job. I was told be them that they would let me know either way by the begining of November and I NEVER heard back from them even after repeated attempts to contact them.
  8. by   RNSacht
    I am a new grad and I walked into a day position 7a-7p right out of school. I agree with what you are saying because there were other nurses who wanted a day position and were told there were none and here I walk right into the days. I do NOT agree with this new grad thing either and I am a new grad!!!!!!!! I think the positions should go to the experienced. I hope things work out for you.
  9. by   LisaRRT
    Sorry you are having the troubles with getting the position you want. It sounds very fustrating. Perhaps it is the location. In my town I could pretty much get a job in any department at any of the hospitals. We are just that short here.

    On the otter side of this coin that others in this thread are mentioning; I would like to say that I know nurses with one/two years experience that are more knowledgable, more skilled, more compassionate, and better clinicans than a few nurses (at least three) I know with 16, 20 and 30 years experience.

    Experience does not make the nurse. Some nurses do not need five, ten, twenty years to know how to perform well in this profession. Some people do not need five, ten, twenty years experience to be a good employee. Employers are looking for not only competent nurses but, good employees too.

    I also realize what experience does bring, it brings more opportunities to see and help treat various disease states, different patient populations, more times to practice getting difficult sticks, more chances to do eveything, and etc...

    Just wanted to throw the other side out there.
  10. by   HappyNurse2005
    Some hospitals even have formal policies against transferring to another unit before working on your current unit for at least 6 months.
    where i am currently requires nurses to have worked on a unit for 1 year before being eligible to transfer within the hospital, unless special permission is granted from the manager. my manager even told me that technically, they don't have to release you to transfer after that year and can try to keep you. she stated that didn't happen much b/c then you have resentful workers.

    what is the hospital;s formal policy on transferring?
  11. by   llg
    Quote from nurseMeghan
    Actually by the time this new program starts I will have been there for almost 8 months. I left a message with the lady that I interviewed with to see if I could speak with her. I'm not really expecting an answer since I had left several messages with her over the last few weeks trying to find out about the job. She never once got back to me. I finally got an answer from the nurse recuiter yesterday and that is how I found out that I didn't get the job. I was told be them that they would let me know either way by the begining of November and I NEVER heard back from them even after repeated attempts to contact them.
    Regardless of your experience with that nurse manager, you should still find out the facts before you jump to conclusions. Perhaps your interview did not go as well as you think it did. Perhaps your references did not recommend you as enthusiastically as you think you did. Perhaps that hospital has had poor results from hiring people transfering from the general peds unit. etc. etc. etc. You won't know until you investigate.

    Until you have the facts, all you can do is speculate. The Nurse Recruiter might be more comfortable talking about your situation than the NICU manager. Make an appointment with the Nurse Recruiter, present yourself well to her that day, and ask her for some honest feedback and career advice. See what she has to say.

    llg

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