Has Anyone Worked A Strike? - page 9

Just wondering what it is like. Anybody have anything to say about the specific companies?... Read More

  1. by   caroladybelle
    Also, one can be the most competent travelor around, and still not be as effective as the regular staff.

    As a travelor, I don't know your auxillary depts, their phone numbers, what exactly that they do, who is responsible for what, where different meds are kept in the different floors/units, how the equipment works and fixing problems with the equipment, what your "routine" protocols are, standing orders and routines, how paperwork is arranged, etc, etc. And while some these things are covered in orientation, many are not. And they do affect our ability to do the job effectively and take time to learn for each facility.

    If there is an emergency, it is always better to have someone that has the locations/phone pages memorized than someone who has to search for the phone number list/unit map to find out. You can be a fabulous travelor and still be at a deficit when the s&*^ hits than fan.

    And hospitals should respect their regular employees and reward them for that reliability.
  2. by   eddy
    Awesome Awesome Replies JT and caroladybelle!

    I work per diem agency full-time and I have done my share of travel assignments through the years as well. However, for these obvious and straightforward reasons that both of you have presented, I have always chosen to avoid scab work. I love travel. It's fun, pays good and provides some unique opportunities. However, I can always do a travel assignment at a NON STRIKING facility. I may be agency but I support the collective bargaining process. It's success is the only way I really see myself returning to a staff job. The union idea is more or less dead in my area currently, and it's a real shame. I sure hope this changes in the future.

    Now with HCA coming in and taking over several of the biggest facilities in my area, the push for union organization will become even more important. However, I just don't think people care here. They honestly seem to rather just quit and get a non nursing job than deal with the fight.
  3. by   -jt
    <I work per diem agency full-time and I have done my share of travel assignments through the years as well. However, for these obvious and straightforward reasons that both of you have presented, I have always chosen to avoid scab work. I love travel.>

    aside to eddy: this AJN article might interest you:
    Have RN, Will Travel?
    American Journal of Nursing - August, 2002 - Volume 102, Issue 8
    http://nursingworld.org/AJN/2002/aug/Issues.htm
  4. by   eddy
    Originally posted by -jt
    <I work per diem agency full-time and I have done my share of travel assignments through the years as well. However, for these obvious and straightforward reasons that both of you have presented, I have always chosen to avoid scab work. I love travel.>

    aside to eddy: this AJN article might interest you:
    Have RN, Will Travel?
    American Journal of Nursing - August, 2002 - Volume 102, Issue 8
    http://nursingworld.org/AJN/2002/aug/Issues.htm
    JT, I've read that one several times in the past and it's a great article.
  5. by   Cruiser
    It seems to me that we could work each other's strikes and come out ahead. I know nurses that have worked them and really liked the money. I mean, once the hospitals get a load of the $$$$ they have to pay out for scabs, they usually give the nurses what they need to stay in nursing. Most of the nurses I know that have been involved in a strike are at least as concerned with short staffing as with money, although that is very important...I mean, I personally don't do this just for the fun of it or because I'm a concerned person.
    Let's face it...someone has to take care of sick people even if regular staff are sick and tired of being treated like slaves...so why not scab nurses...everbody wins...the strikers get what they want -eventually--, the scab nurses make lots of money, and the patients are cared for....that's the way I see it. I have never worked one, by the way, but it might be interesting...maybe some day....
    cruiser
  6. by   hogan4736
    cruiser, suit up for the flaming my friend...


    I agree w/ you 100%, but if I was striking, well, I'm not sure...I signed up for a strikebuster agency once, but never worked...
  7. by   giggly1977
    We didn't have a choice. The head of nursing school told us that we were safe. What were we supposed to do??? Transfer out and start all over again. Did you not understand what I said. The same contract that they were offered before the strike began was the exact same contract that they took after the strike. So, what was the point???? And to each his own. This is a free country. Being a single mother and knowing I have to work, Guess what, categorize me as a "SCAB" because if I didn't cross the picket, then I'd have to go work elsewhere. Oh and by the way, I'm in the union now and they don't do crap for our nurses. They're all about the management, the ones who aren't even in the union. Maybe if we had a union that backed us up, in our hospital now and the hospital that I went to school with, my opinion may be different. SO BE IT, SCAB I AM!!!!!
  8. by   RN,RCIS,RTRCV
    I work as an independent nurse specializing in interventional cardiovascular procedures. I let the managers that I work with know that I do not cross picket lines. It is a bad practice if I ever want to go back there again. I don't want to have anyone on the cardiac team upset. As an aside to this topic, I have considered contacting hospitals who have had reserve RNs deployed overseas. I want to help out anyone who needs the assistance (at a reduced rate, of course).
  9. by   mash406rn
    giggly 1977

    Being a single mother is just an excuse. I am a single mother and I have been on strike 126 days and I am not the only one. Each one of us has a different financial hardship but we've all taken care of eachother, the community has taken care of us, our union has taken care of us; so I don't buy it.

    If you don't feel your union does anything for you, maybe you should work to change that. A union is only as good as those elected to office choose to make it.

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