has anyone worked in infectous disease unit?

  1. has anyone worked in infectious disease unit? the first thought that came to my mind was infectious diseases that patients cannot be placed in med/surg unit, like tb, hiv, mersa etc... do you think this is the right unit for new grad to work?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   EmmaG
    Sure, why not? It sounds like it could be a fascinating place to work, especially if in a research facility.
  4. by   VivaRN
    I worked on an Immunology floor which was similar to an infectious disease unit... though it was mostly HIV. Other patients were mixed in so it did not become an "HIV floor."

    And even then, HIV pts were all over the hospital depending on what they came in for. Not every HIV+ person in the hospital is there due to HIV (ie, an HIV+ trauma pt would not be on the immunology floor).

    But there was a different floor for TB (needed isolation rooms). MRSA pts were all over also.

    For TB and MRSA patients are put on the appropriate type of isolation precautions and given a private room. They, and other ID pts, can still be on a med-surg floor. HIV pts have no special precautions other than what we do for everyone.

    Most hospitals do not have strictly HIV etc. floors anymore because of the stigma associated. Pretty soon word gets out - if Mr. X is on 5B than he must be HIV+!. That sort of thing.

    There is no reason why a new grad couldn't work with ID pts. You may have to be a little more specific than "infectious disease floor" to find what you are looking for. If you tell HR you want to work with TB, HIV, that may get you somewhere. Unless you have a specific place in mind?

    Good luck!
  5. by   sleeplessonthelake
    Quote from graduatenurse
    has anyone worked in infectious disease unit? the first thought that came to my mind was infectious diseases that patients cannot be placed in med/surg unit, like tb, hiv, mersa etc... do you think this is the right unit for new grad to work?
    i've worked acute care for 23yrs, specializing in sicu-cardiovascular openheart recovery. i've had pts. with mrsa,pneumococcal pneumonia. most serious were pnemococcal pts. on the vent. in my area you have to have 1yr experience prior to being allowed on the unit. this tells me you really need to get your feet wet prior to stepping into a specialized area. but that's just my opinion.:spin:
    Last edit by sleeplessonthelake on Dec 25, '07 : Reason: grammer
  6. by   swee2000
    I work on a Med/Surg unit and we have patients all the time with MRSA, C-diff, VRE, etc. And the Medical unit upstairs is equipped with 5 or 6 negative air-flow rooms in the case of patients admitted with TB.
  7. by   siggie13
    This is my advice to new grads: work on a general med floor for a year in order to really learn how to do a good quick evaluation of a patient and to learn about how the body works in general and what happens when it doesn't work. Also, getting comfortable with patients and their care only adds to your comfort level around different patients. I have always thought that a nurse benefits more from a general med-surg floor orientation at first than just jumping into a specialty.

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