Good Bye to Nursing for me... - page 19

Well, the start of a new year and I'm kissing nursing good bye after only 5 short months. I graduated in may and started at a hospital in august. My very first preceptor was a nightmare, on my... Read More

  1. by   asilmk
    I think it's sad for you to be leaving nursing so soon. I would encourage you to give it ample time because nursing can be a rewarding career. BUT, if you know deep down that nursing is not for you, then I would leave as well. Nursing is a constant pressure cooker and if you don't do it as a labor of love you won't be happy.
  2. by   PMFB-RN
    Well, the start of a new year and I'm kissing nursing
    good bye after only 5 short months.

    *** What a shame you took up a spot in your nursing program and denied it to another person who could have had it.

    I graduated in may and started at a hospital in august. My very first preceptor was a nightmare, on my 3rd day on the floor she said I was too slow and put me down in front of other
    nurses or whoever was in distance of hearing her. At one
    point she even said, "well, I have her she know's nothing I have to show her everything." So being enthusiastic I decided NOT to let it get to me and proceeded to take her C*ap for another couple of weeks.

    *** WHY? WHY? WHY did you decide to allow her to treat you like that for any length of time? Why didn't you put an immediate stop to it?

    At which time I was moved to a different floor with a preceptor who was great and I learned alot from. PRoblem was at this hospital IF
    I wanted to stay I'd have to take a evening position.

    *** But before you decided to take up a slot in nursing school you did a little research and knew that nurses very often work different shifts, especially at first, so what what was the big surprise?
  3. by   jahra
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Well, the start of a new year and I'm kissing nursing
    good bye after only 5 short months.

    *** What a shame you took up a spot in your nursing program and denied it to another person who could have had it.

    I graduated in may and started at a hospital in august. My very first preceptor was a nightmare, on my 3rd day on the floor she said I was too slow and put me down in front of other
    nurses or whoever was in distance of hearing her. At one
    point she even said, "well, I have her she know's nothing I have to show her everything." So being enthusiastic I decided NOT to let it get to me and proceeded to take her C*ap for another couple of weeks.

    *** WHY? WHY? WHY did you decide to allow her to treat you like that for any length of time? Why didn't you put an immediate stop to it?

    At which time I was moved to a different floor with a preceptor who was great and I learned alot from. PRoblem was at this hospital IF
    I wanted to stay I'd have to take a evening position.

    *** But before you decided to take up a slot in nursing school you did a little research and knew that nurses very often work different shifts, especially at first, so what what was the big surprise?
    Kindly do not put the nursing guilt trip on the OP for
    "taking up a space in nursing school" Please respect that everyones
    personal needs are unique. She may at some point come back into
    nursing. If she leaves the field that is her choice as an adult.

    Individuals in the nursing profession have been short sighted at
    times. We were laughed at when we asked to get a
    dual degree in business and nursing years ago. We were told
    we were not dedicated to nursing. Slowly the "head nurse"
    titled changed to nurse manager.

    Many business schools accepted nurses for MBA's without the
    requirement that nurses receive a BS in Business first.
    This is not the case for people with BS degrees in other fields who pursue nursing
    (with the exception of some MSN programs).

    Nursing will have a higher retention rate when all individuals are
    respected for their education and individual choices.
    It will grow as it welcomes new ideas and concepts, and
    welcomes new individuals into the profession.

    Degrading a new grad as a preceptor is not a role
    model for any profession.
    Last edit by jahra on Apr 13, '07
  4. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from jahra
    Degrading a new grad as a preceptor is not a role
    model for any profession.
    *** Of course not but nursing in particular seems to have this problem. I simply can not understand why some nurses think it's OK for a preceptor, manager, doctor, co-worker, ect to treat them less than professionally. The OP states that she chose to tolerate such behavior for a period of time. She should not have and neither should any of the rest of us.
    If a nurse is treated badly these are the steps:
    1. Confront the offender at the earliest possible appropriate moment. Inform them of what they are doing and insist that it stop immediately.

    2.If that doesn't work go directly to the supervisor, nurse manager or other appropriate authority. If you get no results leave and get another job. I would strongly consider a lawsuit for hostile work environment.
    Nurse will continue to be treated like crap as long as they choose to.
  5. by   SoundofMusic
    If a nurse is treated badly these are the steps:
    1. Confront the offender at the earliest possible appropriate moment. Inform them of what they are doing and insist that it stop immediately.
    See, this is where I'm really afraid I'm not going to react well to someone treating me badly. I'm not used to it, and honestly, I don't take crap off of people too well. I'm seriously afraid I might say something really rude back and get into trouble -- CAN you get into trouble for being rude back to them? Or, what would a proper response be?

    2.If that doesn't work go directly to the supervisor, nurse manager or other appropriate authority. If you get no results leave and get another job. I would strongly consider a lawsuit for hostile work environment.
    Nurse will continue to be treated like crap as long as they choose to.
    THIS is how it should be. If new nurses are treated badly, they should bring suit against the workplace. If this started, and a few units and their supervisors went to court over it, it would stop it quick.

    Nurses aren't allowed to treat patients badly . .why should they be able to treat their new grads and fellow co-workers so badly?

    The more I read about this, the more worried I get. I'm graduating this summer, and have already been treated badly by nurses even as a student in clinical. The disrespect shown sometimes is really discouraging. I don't get why it continues to happen in light of a nursing shortage.
  6. by   jahra
    This discussion takes me back to the first year I practiced.
    I was a new grad on a Surgical floor. There was a nurse
    who was beyond awesome, what a role model. She had the respect
    of patients, student nurses, collegues and doctors.

    She was such an outstanding individual she was voted
    Nurse of the Year by the State Nurse's Association.

    Not a surprise, she was offered another position with
    another hospital and accepted it.

    Our nurse manager made her life a living **LL until her departure
    to her new position. Additionally the NM told the nurse she would never
    give her a reference.

    It showed our unit the true definition of professionalism.

    The nurse continued on our unit in her usual professional
    way until her departure.

    The nurse manager resigned shortly after much to the relief of the
    staff. Her staff had no respect for her after the above and collectively
    let her know.
    Last edit by jahra on Apr 15, '07
  7. by   purple1953reading
    My very first job after graduation(however many years ago that was) was n a rural hospital with a total of 1-2 RNS on the night shift,an LPN,and however many aides were needed for the patient count. Naturally, being an RN< I went on as CHARGE Nurse, and ER nurse, at the time, a combined position. I did well, and actually enjoyed the learning that combined supervisory with my nursing skills. In fact, have never held a position since graduation, that was not supervisory, my last as house supervisor. Unfortunately, I was involved in a MVA that took me off for a couple of years, to fix my leg. As I plan to return, I wonder if I really want to go back to the hospital or do the legal nurse thing. I am very detail oriented, make very few mistakes, graduated at the top of my class, and enjoy KNOWING that things are RIGHT. I think I would do well in the new legal nurse role. THAT or teach in a nursing program. There are so many things wrong, that I would like to correct before the students graduate and go to practice. I keep up on new meds,protocols, etc. as my mind can;'t stop.

    I wish everyone luck n what they choose to do, but nursing is not for everyone, but there sure are alot of really great people in it.
  8. by   GIRN
    If you're thinking about going into an Administrative job, why not try office nursing. You could work regular hours and the stress would be much less. The money's not that great but you'll be giving that up anyway, in an administrative job. (Or are you saying "an administrative job" meaning "Nursing Administration"? You'll probably need some year's of nursing experience before you'd qualify for that.) Anyway, good luck with your decision and don't let that license expire for a good long while...till you know this is right for you.
  9. by   BoomerRN
    Quote from purple1953reading
    .....As I plan to return, I wonder if I really want to go back to the hospital or do the legal nurse thing. I am very detail oriented, make very few mistakes, graduated at the top of my class, and enjoy KNOWING that things are RIGHT. I think I would do well in the new legal nurse role. THAT or teach in a nursing program......................

    Just a suggestion but If you are a detailed person, try research. I worked in clinical research for 7 1/2 yrs. and enjoyed it. You have a certain degree of independence and the hours are usually good and you have weekends and holidays off.
  10. by   fmwf
    Quote from 4daughters
    I just joined today...and I'm amazed at all of the stories I'm reading about burnout and overwork . I too am in a similar situation. I love my job, but can't STAND the administrative nonsense. Everything is about the bottom line, and seeing how much more they can get out of us. Our manager is often "crazed" - I approached her about a situation when I was in charge, and she came right out and said that I disgusted her because I voiced my concerns. They run our hospital like a hotel, we even have room service. Much of the time, we have patients who are never happy with anything you do. Most of the patients on my unit are quite healthy. Often we are busy starting an IV, doing bloodwork, or other stat nursing interventions, and we get a call on our PHONES (and yes, we have nurses written up over taking one home by mistake!), for ice water or to mop their floors. Housekeeping will not empty linen bags, we have no assistants who help us out, per se, and if we do have the luxury of having one on the unit, she always seems to be "unavailable", or should I say, watching TV in the locker room.
    I think what disturbs me most is that we continue to put up with it. I applaud the younger nurses who are coming out of school and realizing that there's more to life than this. When are we going to stop burying our heads in the sand, and stand up for ourselves? We let administration walk all over us, our managers often times abuse us verbally. Our unit is always under the rule of threats - we can't answer call lights over the intercom - we must physically go to the rooms to see what's wrong - most of the time it's been a mistake - the patient rolled on it, or one of her children pushed it; if we make a lab error of ANY sort, it's grounds for dismissal - this is because our manager has made a goal to have none for the year. We all go about our day in fear. But I have a hard time dealing with the morale - NO ONE is happy - but we can't go to anyone about it, because we have to deal with the wrath of the manager when she finds out we've complained. Nursing has been a big disappointment to me, because how I am practicing is not what I signed up to do. If I had wanted to go into the hospitality/hotel industry, I would have gone to university for that, and made a 6 figure income. I'm now at a crossroads, trying to figure out how to get out of hospital nursing and go into business for myself. Any nurses who have gone into business for themselves, please let me know.
    Hi, I am a new nurse.

    I am starting my own business. Bowel habits growing bad too quickly. No time to eat, hydrate, or potty. Not good.

    Grinning and bearing it with no advocates not good for the immune system.
    Last edit by fmwf on Apr 18, '07 : Reason: meaning
  11. by   fmwf
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I agree.
    Introspection is a good thing. In retrospect, I realize that everything I need to know about how to make it I learned from the Dog Whisperer.

    I gotta have a calm assertive state when entering the unit.

    The unit is the pack. THe time that my clinical instructor barked in front of everyone on our first pre-day of med-surg (preconference introductions,hello my name is...) "There is something about you that I just don't like. Don't talk. I don't think you are going to make it!" It was about me. Was not calm, a little nervous, trying to fake it. Just been told five minutes prior that I had a persistent ovarian tumor. Turned about to be noncancerous, but...She taught me not to speak when I am not calm and centered. She was a bear....But a part of me believes that she knew what lies ahead for some nurses who are not.


    First day on the unit....preceptor would not speak to me/greet me. Never did develop rapport with her. Would set me up negatively in front of patients. When she finally did speak she said in front of the unit, "Why did you not just become a doctor, you're too smart, too much college to be a nurse." Would take 5,6 patients from day one of my 6 week orientation. Don't delude yourself...get what you need. However you need to do it. Don't take abuse. From anybody. Not more than once.

    Watch the Dog Whisperer. When humans work under conditions like nurses do, they operate according to pack animal principles.

    That is my theory.
    Last edit by fmwf on Apr 18, '07
  12. by   olol765
    I too hated nursing. I loved my psych position but HATED the hospital. There are other avenues out there that might fit you. Right now I work in an office auditing charts...and I get paid like a "real" nurse. No stress, no doctors, no patients, no medicines... and yes, no fun!!
  13. by   HappyJaxRN
    Sorry you feel this way. People are people. Not everyone is a good match with their preceptors. I got very lucky. I had a GREAT preceptor. He had some quirks I didn't like, but I overlooked them because I was doing what I really wanted to do. There was a lot of nitpicking and backstabbing going on as well. At first, I steered clear of it, but then it was too hard not to get involved.

    You're first year of nursing is usually hell anyway. There are going to be a lot of things that you don't agree with and things that you don't want to do.

    Perhaps this kind of nursing is not for you. There are tons of other oppertunities out there for you if you persue them. Good luck.

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