Don't wanna always give baths, clean up feces, etc., where to work? - page 6

In clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. I honestly want nothing to do with this once I'm a nurse, so, where/what floors can I work on as a new grad, in order to... Read More

  1. by   blueheaven
    Quote from WannaBCRNA
    In clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. I honestly want nothing to do with this once I'm a nurse, so, where/what floors can I work on as a new grad, in order to avoid this? I do have an interest in Psych nursing.
    Sorry honey, you have no clue. So much can be assessed by performing the nasty little jobs that we do as a part of "holistic and primary" care. Why are you going into nursing??? I see CRNA, don't think they get to play in some nasty stuff??? How about trying to intubate a gagging, vomiting pt who just ingested a 5th of wine prior to coming to hospital. CRNAs get it too. Oh, yes, don't forget the mucus, sputum etc.
    Go major in psychiatry.
    Last edit by blueheaven on Nov 9, '07 : Reason: addenda
  2. by   blueheaven
    Quote from emmanuel goldstein
    well, there ya go, yet another advantage to nursing.

    between the flung poo and spurting blood and projectile vomiting and flying loogies, i've developed cat-like reflexes that are the envy of all my friends.
    had a few spit at me too!!!!!!! amen on the reflexes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  3. by   swee2000
    It's attitudes like this that make me shake my head & wonder why some people enter the nursing profession.

    Can you imagine how our patients would feel if they knew these attitudes existed?
  4. by   RN1989
    Quote from swee2000
    Can you imagine how our patients would feel if they knew these attitudes existed?
    They do know they exist. That is why you have at least one person each week tell you "I am so glad you can do this because no one that I know could stand to do your job." when you are cleaning up a major code brown all over the floor (or substitute your favorite drainage/exrement/body fluid story).

    And then there are all the people who accidently find this forum and read what we write..........
  5. by   RNfaster
    In the early days, doctors used to taste patients' urine to assess for diabetes, etc. I am glad I will never have to do that.

    I have seen disdain for poo amongst both older and younger nurses. One nurse in her 50s told me that she did not have her BSN to clean poo --that it was always the CNA's job. She would also make patients wait for pain pills if they used the call bell too much. I thought the last item was terrible.

    I am waiting to get into nursing school. I know that as I work around poo, it is not as gross. It is easier to clean up.
  6. by   EeyoreAddict
    I know my school just started the rule that you HAVE to take the CNA course before you can even apply for nursing school. YEAH!! They had too many people drop out the first semester whe they figured out what you all ready know!!

    With that - I thought it was an EXCELLENT IDEA!!!! Even being a mom of three I was not sure I wanted to do this. Luckily I had such a WONDERFUL clinical experience that it gave me the confidence I needed. I kept thinking that if this were MY loved one - I would want and DEMAND the best care possible, so why not just do it??
    On the other hand the student sitting next to me in class actually asked if the pts wear a SWIM SUIT for a bath!! ( I AM NOT JOKING) When she found out we had to "TOUCH THEIR PRIVATES" she RAN out of the class!!!
    ONE DOWN!!! LOL
    I see both sides - I want a solid career with decent money - BUT I also want a job that I can have a sense of accomplishment. Even if it is a simple smile from ONE patient!!
    Maybe I am nieve - but if I am - please do not burst my bubble!!! LOL
    Lyn
  7. by   swee2000
    Quote from RN1989
    They do know they exist. That is why you have at least one person each week tell you "I am so glad you can do this because no one that I know could stand to do your job." when you are cleaning up a major code brown all over the floor (or substitute your favorite drainage/exrement/body fluid story).

    And then there are all the people who accidently find this forum and read what we write..........
    All the more reason why, IMO, working as a CNA before &/or during nursing school is important and beneficial. If anything, it would give those with the "don't wanna always give baths, clean up feces, etc" attitude and/or who think they'll never have to do it again once they've got a couple letters after their name, a sense of reality. But that's strictly my opinion and I know it doesn't apply to everyone.
  8. by   Diahni
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    You're headed into the wrong field if you want nothing to do with caring for the basic needs of others.
    To quote a nurse friend, "If you can't deal with body fluids, get out of nursing." That said, there are lots of careers in nursing that don't involve poopy. But you have to pay your dues in med surg first for at least a year. Plan B is going straight to a master's program in psych.
    If you are a new RN or LPN, a psych unit is unlikely to hire you unless you have med-surg experience.
  9. by   Diahni
    Quote from EeyoreAddict
    I know my school just started the rule that you HAVE to take the CNA course before you can even apply for nursing school. YEAH!! They had too many people drop out the first semester whe they figured out what you all ready know!!

    With that - I thought it was an EXCELLENT IDEA!!!! Even being a mom of three I was not sure I wanted to do this. Luckily I had such a WONDERFUL clinical experience that it gave me the confidence I needed. I kept thinking that if this were MY loved one - I would want and DEMAND the best care possible, so why not just do it??
    On the other hand the student sitting next to me in class actually asked if the pts wear a SWIM SUIT for a bath!! ( I AM NOT JOKING) When she found out we had to "TOUCH THEIR PRIVATES" she RAN out of the class!!!
    ONE DOWN!!! LOL
    I see both sides - I want a solid career with decent money - BUT I also want a job that I can have a sense of accomplishment. Even if it is a simple smile from ONE patient!!
    Maybe I am nieve - but if I am - please do not burst my bubble!!! LOL
    Lyn
    Lyn
    The cna thing sounds like a very good idea - why waste your time and money in nursing school if you are going to run out screaming? Now, will you please tell me why all the cnas disappear when the nursing students show up? I actually had one say to me, "We don't have to do anything if there are students to do it!"
    ""
  10. by   Diahni
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    You're headed into the wrong field if you want nothing to do with caring for the basic needs of others.
    To quote a nurse friend, "If you can't deal with body fluids, get out of nursing." That said, there are lots of careers in nursing that don't involve poopy. But you have to pay your dues in med surg first for at least a year. Plan B is going straight to a master's program in psych.
    If you are a new RN or LPN, a psych unit is unlikely to hire you unless you have med-surg experience.
  11. by   Djuna
    I have seen Drs smell urine, suck out pus from an abscess, perform rectal and vaginal examinations (they can get nasty), and get covered in blood from a trauma patient. They may not clean up much but they are still exposed to bodily functions.

    Maybe the OP could consider Paediatrics or Neonatal, at least the vomit, faeces and urine are on a smaller scale than an adult.
  12. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from meimeiy
    Before I started nursing, I couldn't imagine cleaning something's poo poo. Now, it's just part of the job and I don't think twice about it.
    really?
    i must admit, when i see a 'job' to be done, i think twice, thrice and even 100 times, before i start digging in or cleaning up.

    during the 'job', i don't think about it at all.

    but afterwards, i always, always, always feel gratified, to be able to partake in such an intimate experience, and seeing how grateful my pt is.
    i can truthfully say, that part of my personal satisfaction in nsg, is r/t these very experiences.
    it just wouldn't be the same, w/o it.

    leslie
  13. by   RNcDreams
    Perhaps reconsider nursing... but, do a little soul searching first.

    Have you had a bad experience in clinical? Were you not shown what to do first, and found yourself helpless and embarrassed? Are you worried it might make you feel sick?

    I can think of many scenarios that might turn you off to the idea, but the truth is, nurses must care for people.... and it always involves bodily functions.

    If you truly cannot handle poo and all of the other secretions, you need to switch careers.

    If you have had a bad experience and simply feel uneasy and unprepared, swallow your fears and seek out experience with hands on patient care. Push yourself to learn; you will find ways to dissociate from the "gross" part and can focus on the fact that you are alleviating so much discomfort, providing dignity, and are able to assess your patient through it as well.

    Yes, diarrhea is nasty. But if that diarrhea comes from a 14 year old with leukemia, who is on 3 abx and chemo and TPN and more....... you get over it.

    Yes, vomit is nasty.... but if it comes from a mom of 3 who needs her appendix out and who is in pain and exhausted... .. you can let it slide.


    The other strategy you can try, if you find yourself stuck in a "poopy" situation so to speak, is to volunteer to do another nurses non-poopy task for them, if they will take care of your poo for you. It's not a long term solution, but an alternative in a pinch if you know you just can't do it. It keeps you from looking lazy, and lets you gain your composure until your next opportunity to learn!

    PS
    I've never had a problem with bodily functions..... but I have friends from school who did, and they learned to overcome it and work around it and still provide great care!

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