Does Evidence Based Practice Concerning Nurses' Schedules Matter? - page 3

I've been busy lately, as I'm sure many of you have been, as well. I'm also finishing up an online leadership class, and my focus area is staffing/scheduling. I've been interested in this area since... Read More

  1. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    I timed myself on charting one night. our system is all clicks and options with some free hand for when none of the options fit the charting. It takes me 15-20 mins to do complete charting (Assessment, I/O's, CP's, misc notes) from start to end, uninterrupted. So let's go with the 15 mins. If I have 6 pts, that is 90 mins of just pure charting, not doing anything else. 1.5 hrs of just sitting at the computer. So assuming the usual 8 hrs with everything going on, it is already at least 9.5hrs if I get uninterrupted time to chart.
  2. by   kbrn2002
    Quote from NuGuyNurse2b
    I timed myself on charting one night. our system is all clicks and options with some free hand for when none of the options fit the charting. It takes me 15-20 mins to do complete charting (Assessment, I/O's, CP's, misc notes) from start to end, uninterrupted. So let's go with the 15 mins. If I have 6 pts, that is 90 mins of just pure charting, not doing anything else. 1.5 hrs of just sitting at the computer. So assuming the usual 8 hrs with everything going on, it is already at least 9.5hrs if I get uninterrupted time to chart.
    Good idea, I've never timed myself on required charting but I do know it takes a ridiculous amount of my time clicking off orders that have no business being orders. What happened to charting by exception? Now I have to chart for every single one of my residents every shift that there were no side effects and therefore no interventions for the antidepressant that they've been on for years with no side effect yet. Duplicate that same order for any other psychotropic that the resident takes and for some of my residents I am essentially charting on the same order 3 or more times. Crazy waste of time, and that's only one of the multiple silly orders we have to chart on every shift. What person decided that we need to chart every shift that a person on O2 uses a concentrator in their room and portable O2 out of it? Isn't that pretty much common sense? Sadly I could continue with even more of these time wasters.
  3. by   Roz, RN
    When an opening on the 7p shift came available, I agreed to take it provided I work the schedule as it was: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday night. I got the agreement in writing. There is no way I could work nights unless I could work my shifts consecutively. I think most night shifters would agree. To have a work one, off one, work one night schedule promotes exhaustion which increases errors. Scheduling "mandatory" staff meetings or continuing ed classes at times inconvenient to night shifters is another issue we deal with. There is no way that I will finish my shift at 7:30am, come back in at 6:30pm, and attend a 2pm staff meeting! Just send me an email!
  4. by   wyosamRN
    I'd almost certainly leave the bedside without 12hr shifts. I dont think there is any one size fits all answer to scheduling, and I think it is up to individual nurses to maintain safe care. Many people say stacking 6 12hr shifts is dangerous, and I would never work that many DAY shifts in a row. However, 6 on 8 off is a schedule that works very well for many night shift nurses, including myself. Switching my schedule from days to nights half as often has proven to be much easier on my body, and the second half of my stretch is far easier than the first half- by day 3, I've fully switched, and am sleeping during the day without ambien, and feel wide awake all night. I actually find the switch back to days to be pretty easy, but that switch to nights takes a couple days, and it seems stupid to go through the hard part every week, instead of half as often.
  5. by   FolksBtrippin
    I love my 12s.

    Please don't go on and on about evidence without citing a single study.

    It's embarrassing.

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