Do male nurses get less abuse than females by nursing supervisors and patients ? - page 3

My aunt (RN) was telling me that in her experience male nurses tend to not get yelled at as often and in general receive less abuse from fellow co-workers, supervisors, and patients. I am a male and... Read More

  1. by   nursemike
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    yes yes yes.---- And in school , the male students got by with skipping class or sleeping during class. No, they were not failed at any cost. I saw them get 2nd chances on what were SUPPOSED TO BE onetime pass or fail exams (like pharmacology) where the women did not. There was DEFINATE bias, and these men KNEW it and played it to the hilt. Can't blame them.
    Perception is a funny thing...
    Last year, I had a really tough time in clinicals. Definitely got off on the wrong foot with my instructor, at least partly due to dozing in class. Some of my male classmates were (and are) convinced she is anti-male. Haven't heard much about it from female classmates, but some might well say she bent over backwards to keep me in the program.
    Truth, as I see it, is that I'd have had a hard time no matter who the instructor was, but this one did go out of her way to help me, once she saw that I was serious, but exhausted. Got myself a more manageable schedule and learned (somehow) to think more like a nurse, and together we all spared ourselves the indignity of bouncing a straight-A student, and I don't think gender had much of anything to do with it.
    At my job, I am treated pretty well, but I generally treat others well, too. We've had several male nurses join our floor, and the climate has improved, but it's probably more to do with individual personalities than gender. Doctors are usually civil to me, but I'm older than most of them. I do think some patients respond better to males--and not just male patients.
  2. by   tmiller027
    I'm a male nursing student and I've gotten along fine with all the staff at my clinical sites so far.

    One interesting observation is that while I got along with all the nurses, some of my fellow students who are female would mention that some of the staff were rude or snippy with them, but they were nice as can be with me. I don't have an explanation for this, but thought it was interesting.

    From the male students in the 2nd year class, that will all change next year when I do my OB rotation lol
  3. by   pmchap
    MMMM gender - the issue that non of us seem to be able to get away from - or solve. I have personally found that I have had little problems getting on with docs, other nurses or patients. The only time I have run into problems is when working nightshift and I would do rounds - occassionally my 6"1 frame checking on the patients would sometimes scare the little old ladies to death (almost). I have often been confused for a doctor (even when the number of female doctors is ever increasing). I am now a clinical educator and work in civies which makes the confusion even greater. In terms of patients I have found that female patients are often more accepting of me then male patients (perhaps another stereotype raising its head there).

    I do agree with nursemike - it is all about perception.... whether male or female there are some individuals who just don't seem to gel with others.
    Cheers
    Peter
  4. by   SALLY29
    Quote from 11:11
    I dont think yelling will be a problem for you least wise not from coworkers or management.

    Coworkers can definetly be rude but more likely in snide ways.

    As far as pts are concerned I think that women might actually have the edge as they can clamp down on a pt or visiter much the same way a mother can to child. The female nurse being stern is more acceptable to our society. My perspective and subject to objection.

    Ive had two male Doctors raise their voices to me and I told them it was unacceptable. They didnt do it again. There is a female Doc where I work that wont talk to me at all. I dont know why and I havent bothered asking. She was nice to me before she had her baby.

    Bottom line is most people are ok in this profession. Women are the majority. The higher up the acuity ladder you go the more assertive you'll find.

    Either you have what it takes to swim with them or you dont. If youre like me it will take some adjustment-

    11
    I'M DOING A RESEARCH RIGHT ON THIS TOPIC,I'M NOT FINISHED BUT MY SAMPLE SURVYEY SEEMS TO BELIVE THAT FEMALE NURSES GETS THE RAW DEAL.
  5. by   Ross1
    Quote from dazzle256
    I hate to say this but, yes male nurses are treated a lot differently by both female staff and doctors.

    On the flip side in general male nurses are less likely to treat other staff members poorly (like I've seen a lot of female nurses). I like working with male nurses because of this but I have run into a few that take advantage of the fact they can get away with a lot more. I've also seen patients assuming because they are male that they are "doctors"

    On occassion also a patient may refuse to be taken care of by a male nurse. An example of this was a woman brings in her teenage daughter for some kind of abdominal problem to ER and requested her male nurse be replaced by a female. Its usuallly no problem in situations such as this... its not really the male nurses fault nor should the patient have a nurse he/she isn't comfortable with... so we will switch assignments.
    I'd like to "second" paragraph two above. I am male and have NEVER been treated poorly by a male nurse, however, I have been harrassed, bullied, nitpicked, gossipped about, etc etc by countless female RNs over the past 13 years!
  6. by   mattsmom81
    Many female nurses treat their female coworkers the same way, Ross.....its not just the guys getting the flack.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from icusleep
    i have noticed that some male physicians tend to speak differently about male nurses...usually with more respect. example would be overhearing a male physician referring to a male nurse as "mr. jones" or "nurse jones"...."ask mr. jones", or even first name used, "ask david to do that" instead of how he refers to the female nurses as a group, i.e., "get one of the girls to do that". whatever.
    i know life can be difficult for male nurses, so i'm not even going there...except to say that i have never heard of a physician screaming at or throwing things at a male nurse....which is silly...'cuz chicks can knock out teeth just the same as a big guy can.
    i've heard of physicians screaming and throwing things at both male and female nurses. once a surgeon was having a conniption fit because the referring hospital placed a chest tube through the patient's stomach -- the ensuing code was as big a cluster-f@#$ as i've ever seen . . . tempers were high. mike (the surgeon) threw contaminated 4 x 4's at dan (the nurse). he even threw contaminated sharps and hit dan in the chest with one! now mike is about 5'8'' tall and may be 170 pounds; dan is 6'3" and probably 250. dan didn't say a word to mike about it, but some witnesses wrote the whole thing up, and mike had to go to anger management classes. interesting thing is, he didn't have to go to anger management when he whacked the female nurse in the face with a chart!
    [color=#4b0082]
    [color=#4b0082]had a cardiologist with a temper problem hit a male nurse in the face. (at least the nurse says he did, the cardiologist's side of it is "whatever he says, i didn't hit him.") since the cardiologist has been known to throw things at people in the past, i'd believe the nurse! he's never hit a female nurse, though -- just talks to them in a totally sarcastic, demeaning way.
    [color=#4b0082]
    [color=#4b0082]ruby
  8. by   dazzle256
    Quote from ruby vee
    i've heard of physicians screaming and throwing things at both male and female nurses. once a surgeon was having a conniption fit because the referring hospital placed a chest tube through the patient's stomach -- the ensuing code was as big a cluster-f@#$ as i've ever seen . . . tempers were high. mike (the surgeon) threw contaminated 4 x 4's at dan (the nurse). he even threw contaminated sharps and hit dan in the chest with one! now mike is about 5'8'' tall and may be 170 pounds; dan is 6'3" and probably 250. dan didn't say a word to mike about it, but some witnesses wrote the whole thing up, and mike had to go to anger management classes. interesting thing is, he didn't have to go to anger management when he whacked the female nurse in the face with a chart!

    [color=#4b0082]had a cardiologist with a temper problem hit a male nurse in the face. (at least the nurse says he did, the cardiologist's side of it is "whatever he says, i didn't hit him.") since the cardiologist has been known to throw things at people in the past, i'd believe the nurse! he's never hit a female nurse, though -- just talks to them in a totally sarcastic, demeaning way.

    [color=#4b0082]ruby
    what i don't get is how this behavior is allowed to happen in any work environment. i'm trying to picture this behavior in any other profession and getting away with "anger management" classes for assault......assault with a deadly weapon i would imagine........i mean contaminated sharps for heavens sakes.

    my next door neighbor is a secretary for a large company.... anyway her supervisor that had been there 30 years got angry and through a letter opener at her.....hit her in the glasses (thank heavens she wore glasses). this woman that through the letter opener was escorted immediately off the premesis and assault charges were filed.
    Last edit by dazzle256 on Feb 2, '05
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from dazzle256
    What I don't get is how this behavior is allowed to happen in ANY work environment. I'm trying to picture this behavior in any other profession and getting away with "anger management" classes for assault......assault with a deadly weapon I would imagine........I mean contaminated sharps for heavens sakes.

    My next door neighbor is a secretary for a large company.... anyway her supervisor that had been there 30 years got angry and through a letter opener at her.....hit her in the glasses (thank heavens she wore glasses). This woman that through the letter opener was escorted immediately off the premesis and assault charges were filed.
    I don't, either. Why does this EVER happen? Years ago, had a dr throw "dull" episiotomy scissors out of anger, narrowly missing the LPN at the warmer. I wrote him up, and later told him (half jokingly), "darnit I wish you had hit ME. I like your HOUSE ----a lot! Would look lovely with my beater parked in your driveway....." He got the hint, I think. He did laugh, but never again did he throw anything, instruments included.
  10. by   nursemike
    Quote from dazzle256
    What I don't get is how this behavior is allowed to happen in ANY work environment. I'm trying to picture this behavior in any other profession and getting away with "anger management" classes for assault......assault with a deadly weapon I would imagine........I mean contaminated sharps for heavens sakes.

    My next door neighbor is a secretary for a large company.... anyway her supervisor that had been there 30 years got angry and through a letter opener at her.....hit her in the glasses (thank heavens she wore glasses). This woman that through the letter opener was escorted immediately off the premesis and assault charges were filed.
    I'm having a hard time understanding why hospital employees don't seem to believe they have the same rights as others. It is true that we occassionally get assaulted and/or battered by people with altered mental status, but in my observations, those instances are far less frequent than offenses by people who know better, and could be held legally accountable for their actions. Whether or not the administration likes it, a doctor who assaults a nurse can be put in jail. I don't think I've ever seen a doctor who wouldn't get the point after a few times of that. (Actually, I wonder whether a felony conviction might get a doctor out of the doctor business for good.)
    As for hospital administrators who allow such conditions to persist, a few civil settlements would probably get their attention, too. (No, I'm not naive about retaliation, but with a nod to SmilingBlueEyes, I'll bet the CEO's house would make a pretty nice severance payment, too.)
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    rofl I love how you think, Mike.
  12. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    I've been yelled at many times by patients over a wide variety of issues. I haven't noticed if it's more or less than female nurses.

    I have found on many occasions a female nurse will in report tell me what an awful mean and demanding, or needy patient they have had all day, and they are a completely different patient to me. I've always thought it was my kind, caring demeanor and effective therapeutic communication style. Never thought it was because I was a man.

    I don't think one can generalize here, but it might be true in some cases, but I doubt it's widespread.
    My male coworkers tell me that they have noticed that they don't get the verbal abuse that we females get. I don't know if it is because they have a more authoritative tone to the voices or if they just don't put up with the S*** from patients.
  13. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from nursemike?
    I'm having a hard time understanding why hospital employees don't seem to believe they have the same rights as others. It is true that we occassionally get assaulted and/or battered by people with altered mental status, but in my observations, those instances are far less frequent than offenses by people who know better, and could be held legally accountable for their actions. Whether or not the administration likes it, a doctor who assaults a nurse can be put in jail. I don't think I've ever seen a doctor who wouldn't get the point after a few times of that. (Actually, I wonder whether a felony conviction might get a doctor out of the doctor business for good.)
    As for hospital administrators who allow such conditions to persist, a few civil settlements would probably get their attention, too. (No, I'm not naive about retaliation, but with a nod to SmilingBlueEyes, I'll bet the CEO's house would make a pretty nice severance payment, too.)
    Verbal and physical assaults are not reported, because we are brained wash to believe that it isn't nice for the nurse to make waves for the docs-"do you really believe the doc was trying to hurt you or do you really want this to go on their record?"
    Nurses, who do report on these incidents see to be targeted by management afterwards, - change of assignment, more frequent evals, etc., as a means of discouraging others from reporting it.

    I have reported docs for verbal abuse and insisted that it be made part of their work record. If any of them tried to physically assault me, my first call would be to 911, not administration.

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