Differences Between LPNs/LVNs and RNs - page 2

I am currently an LVN student with intentions of bridging to an RN program someday. This question is to the experienced nurses. What, in your opinions, are the main differences between LVNs/LPNs... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    The only two states that uses LVN titles are Texas and Cailifornia..




    Quote from Zachary2011
    LVN and LPN are the exact same liscense, ones vocational and ones practical, it just depends the state your in on which title you have, I believe texas is the only state that calls an LPN an LVN.......... no difference in the two at all.
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    This has RNitis writen all over it!!!!! But lets not make this a argument over LVN roles vs Rn roles. :smiley_ab




    Quote from CA CoCoRN
    Standing up and SHOUTING!!! Stomping my FEET AND CLAPPING MY HANDS!!!! YES!!!!

    That's why I became an RN (and will go on to become an advanced practice RN). I don't want to be a doctor because I don't like where healthcare is going in that respect (and I don't like the hours I'd have to keep as an OB)...but I want my "independence". The way we function on the floor...esp. in higher acuity areas, we are the next best thing, the ONLY thing, until and if the physician gets here.

    Many LVNs don't get it because they don't see the functioning of the RN role in arenas like mine (L&D). LVN can't do what I do. Simple fact. State and "medical law" dictates that.

    Check your practice acts: RN is by far the most autonomous role, regardless of what YOUR individual facility may allow you to do.


    By the by: CA calls them LVNs too.
  3. by   TheCommuter
    I was not attempting to turn this into an LVN versus RN board. There's no need to become snappy and defensive when I ask a question in a non-confrontational manner. I am a student. The primary role of the student is to learn. I asked this particular question to learn something. I am not at this message board to troll or pit people against eachother. Surely this is something you can understand?

    If you felt there was something flawed with this question, you were not obligated to answer it.

    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    check your State Board of Nursing and Nurse Practice Act for accurate info please. You will find the most accurate depiction of scopes of practice of RNs and LPNs there. Let us PLEASE NOT make this an RN versus LPN/LVN thread.
  4. by   LPNer
    Quote from CA CoCoRN
    Standing up and SHOUTING!!! Stomping my FEET AND CLAPPING MY HANDS!!!! YES!!!!

    That's why I became an RN (and will go on to become an advanced practice RN). I don't want to be a doctor because I don't like where healthcare is going in that respect (and I don't like the hours I'd have to keep as an OB)...but I want my "independence". The way we function on the floor...esp. in higher acuity areas, we are the next best thing, the ONLY thing, until and if the physician gets here.

    Many LVNs don't get it because they don't see the functioning of the RN role in arenas like mine (L&D). LVN can't do what I do. Simple fact. State and "medical law" dictates that.

    Check your practice acts: RN is by far the most autonomous role, regardless of what YOUR individual facility may allow you to do.


    By the by: CA calls them LVNs too.
    OK, you think we do not know what you do...do you think we are blind and stupid as well? Tell me, what do you do that I could not do with a couple of very minor changes to the scope of practice? Even if I still had to work under the direction of an MD, etc, standing orders would "cover" me for anything you do. Yes, LPNs can now follow/implement standing orders so that would not even have to be changed! There would need to be changes in the new IV laws, implemented to hold LPNs back I might add, since I was doing far more, legally, with IVs than I do am allowed to do now.
    What RNs don't understand is that a staff nurse does not need to be an independant practitioner to provide excellent care.
  5. by   txspadequeenRN
    STANDING UP!!!! SHOUTING STOMPING !!!!!!!!!!MY FEET TO LPNer's RESPONSE




    Quote from LPNer
    OK, you think we do not know what you do...do you think we are blind and stupid as well? Tell me, what do you do that I could not do with a couple of very minor changes to the scope of practice? Even if I still had to work under the direction of an MD, etc, standing orders would "cover" me for anything you do. Yes, LPNs can now follow/implement standing orders so that would not even have to be changed! There would need to be changes in the new IV laws, implemented to hold LPNs back I might add, since I was doing far more, legally, with IVs than I do am allowed to do now.
    What RNs don't understand is that a staff nurse does not need to be an independant practitioner to provide excellent care.
  6. by   CA CoCoRN
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    This has RNitis writen all over it!!!!! But lets not make this a argument over LVN roles vs Rn roles. :smiley_ab
    "RNitis"? Mmmm, okay. I was not making an argument as to invaluability at all, or functioning of roles. I will say this: if you choose to do what you do, do you to the BEST of your ability. DO NOT, however, belittle the "greater" education that I've obtained and in turn, I WILL NOT downplay your abilities.
  7. by   CA CoCoRN
    Quote from LPNer
    OK, you think we do not know what you do...do you think we are blind and stupid as well? Tell me, what do you do that I could not do with a couple of very minor changes to the scope of practice? Even if I still had to work under the direction of an MD, etc, standing orders would "cover" me for anything you do. Yes, LPNs can now follow/implement standing orders so that would not even have to be changed! There would need to be changes in the new IV laws, implemented to hold LPNs back I might add, since I was doing far more, legally, with IVs than I do am allowed to do now.
    What RNs don't understand is that a staff nurse does not need to be an independant practitioner to provide excellent care.
    No, I do not think you, as an LVN/LPN, are blind nor stupid. I say what I say as a result of speaking to a couple (read 2) LVNs who became RNs, and what they had to tell me about the CHANGE in their THINKING and FUNCTIONING in their new role. Though both of them worked in my specialty, they didn't function in the role of RN and thus were a bit shocked as to what we do...that they didn't see from the outside looking in. I do take those role requirements for granted as I've never been anything but an RN, so speaking to them opened my eyes and made me see the other side. The side that you are speaking from right now.
    If you choose to go on to RN, you may or may not see what they saw. Good on you whether you do or not.

    As for "holding you back" as an LPN: no one is doing that. If you are unhappy and feel slighted, change the law, or go back to school. RN is as it is, "above" the LVN...same as NP is "above" the RN. I could get mad because I hold the same license that an NP has to have, but I'm not given that recognition automatically. But, alas, that would be silly since that role REQUIRES MORE EDUCATION. Simple and plain. To get that recognition, I've got to go back to school.


    Let's not get into the "you could do what I do with just a little more training". That "little more training" is the educational path that leads to being an RN. Therefore the point is moot.
  8. by   cursenurse
    Quote from CA CoCoRN
    Not to be snippy....but why become an R.N. if the info that you LEARNED to get into the role, you're "yawning" at. The whole reason behind the greater education (of becoming an RN) is that you learn WHY you are doing what you're doing, not just to DO. I don't think there's any yawning in that. *scratching head*

    i agree with what you're saying about the rn education telling me as an lpn why i was doing alot of what i did. i was often bored in clinicals though, because i wasn't doing anything different than what i did as an agency lpn in the hospital.
  9. by   mmeow
    A couple of minor changes to scope and practice and taking courses in the theory and education that goes along with those changes in scope and practice. :Melody:
  10. by   mmeow
    Standing up on a table with a fog horn...clicking my heels....hooting and yelling to the world that finally someone has worded it accurately. The exra training, or educating I prefer to call it, that would increase an LPN's scope is redundant, their role in general does not require it as...... that extra training is already being utilized in the RN program.

    Way ta go.... woohoo. Proud to be who I am, which just happens to be an RN!

    "Let's not get into the "you could do what I do with just a little more training". That "little more training" is the educational path that leads to being an RN. Therefore the point is moot"
  11. by   caye
    The basic difference is that RN's learn more "theory" which of course takes more time in school. RN's can go into management positions; there are fewer management positions available for LVN's.
    I am an RN, but please do not any LPN/LVN's take offense. LVN's typically have more "floor experience" but not always, especially in Critical Care you must be an RN. As ADON of two facilities, I have worked with many LVN's that I had the highest respect for and would be comfortable and confident in their nursing skills and ability to care for myself or family members.
    I hope this helps. I repeat, please do not anyone be offended at my comments. I have the highest respect for anyone in the nursing profession as it is very hard and demanding work. (Excluding those few lacking skills and compassion to care for patients).
    Good Luck and the best to you.
    Caye







    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am currently an LVN student with intentions of bridging to an RN program someday. This question is to the experienced nurses. What, in your opinions, are the main differences between LVNs/LPNs and RNs?
  12. by   LPNer
    Quote from caye
    The basic difference is that RN's learn more "theory" which of course takes more time in school. RN's can go into management positions; there are fewer management positions available for LVN's.
    I am an RN, but please do not any LPN/LVN's take offense. LVN's typically have more "floor experience" but not always, especially in Critical Care you must be an RN. As ADON of two facilities, I have worked with many LVN's that I had the highest respect for and would be comfortable and confident in their nursing skills and ability to care for myself or family members.
    I hope this helps. I repeat, please do not anyone be offended at my comments. I have the highest respect for anyone in the nursing profession as it is very hard and demanding work. (Excluding those few lacking skills and compassion to care for patients).
    Good Luck and the best to you.
    Caye
    I don't see how anyone could be offended by your remarks.
    I might add, and I hope you are not offended, that theory can be learned outside a formal classroom. (even the bridge programs achknowledge that) and just because a nurse has not paid for the college credits, does not mean s/he has not learned the material.
    That has been my entire arguement.
    It has become the requirement in this country for anything learned to be proven by college credits. Healthcare can not afford that, as nurses, we should all work together to find a better way than formal education. (Though there is a need for a good mix of formally educated nurses and nurses with on-the-job learning) College credits, costing upwards of $200. (that doesn't include miscelaneous fees) to prove you have learned what you need to know to be a great, competant nurse will not take nursing into the future with a very "green" outlook.
    I do not understand why so many can not see this.
    There are LPNs who will never be capable of provding any more than basic nursing care because they do not want to know "why." This however, should not stop those of us who want to know "why" for everything that comes past us. We should not be penalized and held back to basic bedside care because we lack the resources to prove our knowledge with college credits. Now, no matter how many years of experience and no matter how much an LPN knows, s/he is not an RN and there must be some definition there. RNs do need to be at least financially rewarded for the extra formal education as well as have advancement opps available that are not available to LPNs no matter how capable they are.
    Oh well, thanks for listening. Maybe someday, before I die, I will see this change happening! Have a long time to give to that because I don't plan on dieing any time soon!
  13. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from CA CoCoRN
    Not to be snippy....but why become an R.N. if the info that you LEARNED to get into the role, you're "yawning" at. The whole reason behind the greater education (of becoming an RN) is that you learn WHY you are doing what you're doing, not just to DO. I don't think there's any yawning in that. *scratching head*
    Oh come on now...lighten up! I think he/she was referring to the management aspect of their education anyway.

    I've been an LPN four years and I'll graduate from an ASN program very soon and the only real difference I can see is there are more job opportunities for RN's than LPN's.
    I'm going to immediately go for a bachelor's degree because I want to eventually go for NP.
    It all has to do with job opportunities. That, and, deservedly or not, people will give you more credibility if you are an RN, though this certainly is not a guarantee a person knows what they are doing. The best nurse I've ever seen is an LPN, and I have seen some RN's who don't have the sense God gave a goose.

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