declining a nursing job without burning a bridge?

  1. 0
    So the deal is I recieved two job offers from jobs I interviewed for.
    I got called back from job 1, accepted, but have not signed anything but am "provisionally" hired waiting on criminal background check and references. Job 2 is what I really wanted, but was sure I wouldn't get a call back from them. However, they called back, I accepted that job and should be meeting with an employee specialist from HR to sign paperwork. My question is, what is the best way to go about declining job 1 without burning bridges there? Should I call the nursing director who interviewed me or the human resources manager? And what would I say to either one to not destroy any chance of getting hired by them again incase I wanted to relocate to that facility sometime in the future? Help?
  2. 11 Comments so far...

  3. 4
    Quote from NurseNancy88
    So the deal is I recieved two job offers from jobs I interviewed for.
    I got called back from job 1, accepted, but have not signed anything but am "provisionally" hired waiting on criminal background check and references. Job 2 is what I really wanted, but was sure I wouldn't get a call back from them. However, they called back, I accepted that job and should be meeting with an employee specialist from HR to sign paperwork. My question is, what is the best way to go about declining job 1 without burning bridges there? Should I call the nursing director who interviewed me or the human resources manager? And what would I say to either one to not destroy any chance of getting hired by them again incase I wanted to relocate to that facility sometime in the future? Help?
    Yeah, that's a sticky one....but I think if I had someone call me, and tell me they'd been interviewing and were just hearing back from people, and at this time you feel you need to accept a different position, and they told me personally (not a note from HR)- I'd consider them in the future. If you're good to hire now, you should be good enough again as long as nothing changes that would effect that... And the second place isn't waiting for anything else to come back to sign paperwork. If you really prefer the second one, I don't see any obligation (other than professional courtesy) holding you to the first JMHO
    Last edit by xtxrn on Jul 29, '11 : Reason: clarify
    FancypantsRN, MassED, tyvin, and 1 other like this.
  4. 5
    The faster you let them know, the better it will be.
    Altra, MassED, llg, and 2 others like this.
  5. 2
    The truth always works.
    SoCalCrafter and xtxrn like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from tyvin
    The truth always works.
    I have to agree. I would simply say that (and I would word it just like it) "I'm declining the position because of a better offer from a different hospital."

    This will a) not burn the bridge because they (should) understand that you need to take care of yourself first and b) ensure that you don't burn bridges because (and this is even if they put this down on file) you were diplomatic with your response.

    Remember, the hospital has "offered" you employment, you haven't signed on yet.

    ALSO, if the hospital wants you bad enough, they may change their offer. If you decline they make come back with a) the position you want from the other hospital, or b) a higher pay for the position they originally offered. (or both, but thats rare)

    Good luck.
    tyvin likes this.
  7. 0
    Thanks for the feedback everyone! So in relation to responses, the most appropriate thing to do would be to call the nursing director who interviewed me, and explain that I will be accepting another job offer from a different hospital.
    Would it be inappropriate to explain the reason being a higher salary? I know this is a silly question but sometimes I think a fault of mine is being too honest to the point of being naive... Or is it best to leave that out? I appreciate any input!
  8. 2
    Quote from NurseNancy88
    Thanks for the feedback everyone! So in relation to responses, the most appropriate thing to do would be to call the nursing director who interviewed me, and explain that I will be accepting another job offer from a different hospital.
    Would it be inappropriate to explain the reason being a higher salary? I know this is a silly question but sometimes I think a fault of mine is being too honest to the point of being naive... Or is it best to leave that out? I appreciate any input!
    I'd leave out the salary part unless she specifically asks- but don't emphasize that...if you do go back, they'll wonder why you'd be willing to take less money. JMHO
    NaKcl and tyvin like this.
  9. 22
    Quote from NurseNancy88
    Thanks for the feedback everyone! So in relation to responses, the most appropriate thing to do would be to call the nursing director who interviewed me, and explain that I will be accepting another job offer from a different hospital.
    Would it be inappropriate to explain the reason being a higher salary? I know this is a silly question but sometimes I think a fault of mine is being too honest to the point of being naive... Or is it best to leave that out? I appreciate any input!
    There are probably 50 more posts after this one, but this caught my eye.

    In rejecting a job offer, only two things should be said. 1. "I must decline your offer of employment as I have been offered a position that better suits my needs." 2. "I really enjoyed interviewing with you and should my situation change, I hope that I might apply to your institution again".

    Done.
    esca2006, serenitylove14, tokidoki7, and 19 others like this.
  10. 5
    Funny, I went through this same scenario last week! First and foremost, let us take a moment to be thankful for not only one job offer, but two!!

    I ended up calling the first job (the already accepted job - I chose the 2nd) and speaking to the nursing recruiter who hired me. She was very personable, and very understanding. She appreciated my call - and the really cool part? I politely suggested that they look at my friend's resume, who had interviewed at the same time I did (and didn't get a job). Well, they took my advice and hired her! So excited...things really do happen for a reason!
    tofu-tofu, MassED, <3 RN <3, and 2 others like this.
  11. 2
    I just this week went through this scenario. I had interviewed for a new grad residency position at the hospital I have been wanting to get into but didn't get it. I then went weeks without hope then had an interview at an LTAC facility. It went well, they picked their top five candidates but only had 4 offers. Guess who was their 5th choice? Yep, me! Ugh! I was disappointed but the nurse recruiter told me that if someone had to back out, they would be calling me with an offer. During this time, the new grad residency hospital was able to open some more spots and the nurse recruiter there set me up with 4 interviews for this week. Lo and behold, the recruiter at the LTAC facility called me Monday with an offer! Someone that had accepted an offer decided to go with a different hospital. I accepted the offer because they also have a great internship program for new grads and, I needed a job! . I had 3 of my 4 interviews this past Wed. that went very well with one of the nurse managers wanting to hire me on the spot! Yesterday I got a call from this hospital with two offers! I weighed the pros and cons and decided that the new grad residency hospital was going to better suit my needs. Let me tell you though, I struggled last night with how to tell the LTAC facility I had accepted an offer with that I decided to take a position elsewhere. Never having to do this before, I too was afraid of burning bridges. After getting friends opinions on how to handle it and reading these forums here, I made the call to the LTAC facility this morning and declined their offer just stating that I had decided to take another position elsewhere that would be better suited for me. The recruiter was very kind and gracious, told me she was disappointed I wouldn't be working with them, wished me luck in my endeavors and told me to please contact them in the future should my needs change (prob classic HR response). Either way, she made me feel fine about my decision and I figure, this happens a lot with new grads when there are residencies and options to choose from. I cancelled my interview that was scheduled for today because I knew which offer I was going to take. I still shake my head at how it all went down for me...going several weeks in between interviews, going from one offer that I first accepted to 4 interviews in a week with two offers coming out of 3 of those interviews! I'm very thankful, and excited...I start my residency program (already in session and classes I've missed will be tacked onto the end), this Wednesday!

    Congrats on your new job too!!
    aprilpam77 and tyvin like this.


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