Could this affect my chance at employment?

  1. I had an abusive father who wasn't a very productive contributor to the family. At 35 I'm thinking I'd like to see someone to try to put it all behind me. However, I wonder if there are questions about this kind of thing when you apply for a nursing license or a job. I understand confidentiality issues, but I would not be willing to omit information about my medical history on an application.

    Any idea if seeing a psychologist or a counselor (and therefore documenting my desire to resolve the issues of the past) might affect the way I am perceived by potential employers? Would this even come into play at all?

    Thank you in advance for any information you can provide.

    Regards,
    Kenny B.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi and welcome. I wouldn't think that there would be any problems at all. Seeing a counselor or psychologist or even being on psychotropic meds is not a reason to not hire someone.

    Good luck.
  4. by   mamason
    I don't beleive you are required to disclose that type of info to any perspective employer. It is your personal business and have the right to keep it to yourself if you choose to do so.
  5. by   abooker
    If an employer would choose to discriminate against you because you've sought help, do you really want to work for that employer?

    Where I've worked before, there have been so many people with "issues" that managers joked about putting a Prozac machine in the breakroom. One nurse had bipolar disorder. He thought his co-workers needed to know, because he didn't want anything to stand in the way of his being a safe nurse. He said they could tell him or his wife if he needed his meds adjusted, but he never did.

    Resolving, or at least addressing, your own problems should help you become a stronger person and a stronger nurse. It is hard to take care of others when you're not taking care of yourself.
  6. by   Spritenurse1210
    "Resolving, or at least addressing, your own problems should help you become a stronger person and a stronger nurse. It is hard to take care of others when you're not taking care of yourself."

    I completely agree with abooker on this one!!!

    First I wish to commend you for seeking help. I personally would not disclose this information to your employer, for the basic reason, it is YOUR personal business. I too am an abuse survivor, if you need to talk, send me a private message any time.
    Last edit by Spritenurse1210 on Oct 30, '06
  7. by   TazziRN
    There should not be any reason to disclose this information, unless the questionaire for the employee health physical asks about it. It would be treated as confidential and it should not stand in the way of employment, since by the time you're sent for the physical you've probably been hired. And the only way it would be asked is if you are on any mental health meds, not if you're getting counselling.
  8. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Hi and welcome. I wouldn't think that there would be any problems at all. Seeing a counselor or psychologist or even being on psychotropic meds is not a reason to not hire someone.

    Good luck.
    I'm going to direct this question to you...I have seen on some employment applications regarding receiving therapy, but it seems I have always seen this question presented as if you had a mental illness (depression, bi-polar, OCD, etc). I would think that since she is seeing someone totally voluntary, and for personal coping and not because she is having a condition treated, she would be well within her right not to disclose this information on an application, should it be asked.

    Am I right on that?
  9. by   kenny b
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    I'm going to direct this question to you...I have seen on some employment applications regarding receiving therapy, but it seems I have always seen this question presented as if you had a mental illness (depression, bi-polar, OCD, etc). I would think that since she is seeing someone totally voluntary, and for personal coping and not because she is having a condition treated, she would be well within her right not to disclose this information on an application, should it be asked.

    Am I right on that?
    First allow me to thank you all for your kindness. It is very reassuring and I'm a bit overwhelmed.

    Second, I want to put your minds at ease here since I may have worried some of you. I'm not terribly scarred over the whole thing, and I don't suffer on a daily basis. I just have some anger over it all that I want to release. After all, I've got to conserve energy for nursing school no? :wink2:

    I just want to get this resolved so I can be an even better husband and father, and a stellar nurse.

    I've seen similar things on applications (questions about actual disorders rather than voluntary visits). I wrote because I was wondering if nursing applications were any different. It sounds like that portion of the application process is the same.

    Thank you all again!

    Regards,
    Kenny B.
  10. by   kenny b
    And now for the million-dollar question: How do I find someone who is talented (and incidentally doesn't want to milk my visits for personal gain)?

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