CONTINUED IN WHAT IS THE MAJOR REASON Why are they all leaving? - page 22

What conditions would cause so many nurses to leave? Our ER has been losing friends fast. Why is there such a large turnover in nursing? I'm going to school, yet I talk to many RN's who are looking... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from ShelNewGrad
    As a RN, you have at least 4-5 patients depending on you (typical med/surg floor) ....

    ShellyNewGrad
    4-5? sounds wonderful. I never had fewer than 7 on med surg, and usually had 12-13. No CNA, no unit clerk. Charge does not take pt's and does not help. 4-5 pt sounds ideal to me.
  2. by   Kayartea
    Was at a Nursing Symposium last year where one of the speakers said that 90% of critical care nurses end up with some form of PTSD. Must be even worse in the ED. MS has a lot to deal with, too. Maybe that has something to do with all the nurses leaving. That, and the fact that there are more job options now, where you can make a living. The overall treatment of nurses hasn't changed much since it and teaching were the only jobs available to women. Nurses have changed, the job hasn't.
  3. by   Gromit
    Quote from dixielee
    very well said emernurse. that is why i am so tired. when no one else will do it, the nurse will. when housekeeping won't clean the room because it is too dirty, the nurse does it. when there is no transporter to take that patient to ct, the floor, x-ray, the nurse does it. when there is no iv team, phlebotomist, etc. (and there never is in the er), the nurse does it. when there is no one to get a meal for the patient, the nurse does it, even when we don't get one ourself. when the tube system is broken, who takes the blood tubes to the lab, who gets meds from the pharmacy? of course the nurse does. yep, and who covers the doctors butt when they are tired or inexperienced and make mistakes.....yep, the nurse.

    it is a very heavy weight. one i have carried well for 30+ years, but my neck is getting tired from the weight.

    btw, i love your tagline, because if not for stupid people, we would be unemployed!! "sweetheart, there ain't no cure for stupid!"
    aye, well said! and let us not forget that while you're taking that patient down to ct, or xray (or whatever), you have to be with them because they have to be tele-monitored, and while you're gone for that 45+minutes your other patients still need to have their meds passed, evaluations done, charting done, etc etc etc. so you're just getting behind.

    food. well, officially, we aren't allowed to eat at the nurses station. in reality, if we eat at all, its bites between tasks -decidedly not healthy- and while charting.

    -someone mentioned bariatric patients. sigh, my back aches everytime i see yet another 5-600 pounder being admitted. no way is it practical to turn them effectively q2h -hell, half the time they don't actually fit on the bed lying on their backs! sigh.
    some nights i can hear the ventilator alarms going off hours after i've arrived home. i'm so glad my wife doesn't work in the med. field.
  4. by   Gromit
    Quote from ingelein
    I agree wholeheartedly, BUT when we stand up for ourselves, when we have grown that backbone,when we refuse unsafe assignments, etc, etc.,what usually happens? In my experience the nurse/ nurses get booted out ,or harrassed until they quit and go somewhere else. NOW they have gone somewhere else and found out that it is no different. NOW WHAT?? How can we get that group power that allows us to band together for the good? If you are waiting for a law to get passed, it will be a long wait, SO what did sweat shop workers do to improve thier working conditions years ago? If I sound condesending, PLEASE forgive me , I dont mean to, I just want to hear some opinions from my fellow nurses as to HOW we can affect change. I really dont know myself, but have some ideas.
    Well, it all sounds rather keen. But what teeth does a union have in a state like mine, that is a 'right to work' state? I understand where you're coming from, and even agree in principle, but like (I assume) most here, I cannot afford to be out of work for any length of time -and the worst thing that can happen to a union is when the people who participate in said union won't actually show any resolve when the union calls for it. I've worked around unions, and I've been a member of one -the one I was a member of had members that were members in name only -they had no resolve. That made the union less than useless -it made it dangerous. Because even though blackballing is illegal (federally) you had better believe that it does exist.
    Thankfully, unlike many, I DO have other options if push came to shove. I still hold a CDL-class A, and a clean record -while it wouldn't be my preferred thing to do, I could go back to driving tractor-trailers if I had to. If you sign up to a union, you must be prepared for the consequences -otherwise you're doing nothing but a disservice.
    I agree that nursing conditions aren't likely to get any better without nurses as a group making a stand. But with rare exception, I haven't seen it happen.

    -Would I cast my lot for a union if one were trying to get into my facility? Depends. I wouldn't dismiss it outright, but I'd want to know more about 'em before saying 'yes'.
  5. by   mamason
    Quote from Sylv
    I'd like to know the answer too. One nurse speaks up, the rest follow along with the program like a bunch of sheep, and the outspoken nurse gets labeled as a troublemaker, or they make it look like she is crazy, or she is the one with a problem.

    There is power in numbers and nurses united could make changes, in my opinion.

    How to get nurses to stick together and stand up for themselves as a group? That's a good question. They just don't do it.
    Exactly....that's part of the problem. Who wouldn't be afraid to stand up to administration? Especially if you have a mortgage and a family to care of. But, I think the answer is in numbers we are strong. Just getting those numbers on the same page is the problem. I don't have the answers either. Peple have suggested unions. I've never worked union. There really aren't a lot around here. BUt, sounds like they could give some protection to nurses. A lot of great input on this thread from fellow nurses. Seems like we are all sick of pretty much the same treatment that is given to us. But, we are only a small number on this board.
  6. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from Gromit
    Well, it all sounds rather keen. But what teeth does a union have in a state like mine, that is a 'right to work' state? I understand where you're coming from, and even agree in principle, but like (I assume) most here, I cannot afford to be out of work for any length of time -and the worst thing that can happen to a union is when the people who participate in said union won't actually show any resolve when the union calls for it. I've worked around unions, and I've been a member of one -the one I was a member of had members that were members in name only -they had no resolve. That made the union less than useless -it made it dangerous. Because even though blackballing is illegal (federally) you had better believe that it does exist.
    If you sign up to a union, you must be prepared for the consequences -otherwise you're doing nothing but a disservice.
    I agree that nursing conditions aren't likely to get any better without nurses as a group making a stand. But with rare exception, I haven't seen it happen.

    -Would I cast my lot for a union if one were trying to get into my facility? Depends. I wouldn't dismiss it outright, but I'd want to know more about 'em before saying 'yes'.
    OK then, how do we improve the unions that we hire to represent us? How about reporting them en mass to the NLRB? There IS a way to get rid of a BAD union, why throw out the concept of what a union was originally founded on?Why not get together as many of the facilities staff that have been done wrong by this bad union, get rid of the said union and fill their place with a union that can PROVE their track record? My daughter is a Employee/Labor Attorney, NOT affiliated with ANY union, works for a government agency, she ASSURES me there are ways to FIRE your Bad , Ineffectual, Corrupt, Union. Maybe if unions had to compete against each other we could shop around and get the BEST one? OR am I a Pollyanna, an eternal optimist, or just plain stupid??
  7. by   P_RN
    Closing this one and leaving the identical next thread open.

close