Cold weather causing pneumonia? *vent* - page 3

This is just a vent.. My grandma told my brother not to go outside without his jacket because he'd catch a cold..or even worse pneumonia. But according to my microbio textbook, this isn't true... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    Quote from AshleyDawn20
    This is just a vent.. My grandma told my brother not to go outside without his jacket because he'd catch a cold..or even worse pneumonia. But according to my microbio textbook, this isn't true because colds are viruses and pneumonia is bacterial/viral/many other causes NOT related to weather. When I mentioned this (in front of my ENTIRE family) they laughed in my face and basically acted like I was a complete idiot. I told them that as a nursing student, I know to not give out any information unless it's referenced. But they replied that it's "common knowledge" that going out into the cold will cause these problems. Then my grandma had the nerve to say that because she was a "nurse" and I'm only a student that she was right and I was wrong. She's a nurse's aide/home care worker NOT a nurse. I corrected her and she was like "it's the same thing." Grrrr my family makes my mad sometimes. :angryfire Anyway I'm just wondering what you guys think about this... from what I've searched on the internet I can find no truth that cold causes colds.. the only thing I've found is that colds are more likely in winter due to everyone staying indoors in close contact with eachother. Is there ANY truth to colds causing colds/pneumonia? Also, I've had things happen like this before, how do you get people to believe you when you KNOW you're right about something? I've tried showing them reliable sources where I have the info, like textbooks and drug guides, but my families convinced I don't know what I'm talking about. This has caused me to have anxiety in clinicals with doing patient teaching, because I worry my patients will think I'm giving them unreliable info, but so far the clients I've had seem to appreciate the info I provide them with..Wow, that felt good to let that all out!
    So what is your problem. There is a lot of basis for truth in some of those old addages your grandmother tells you. Doesnt mean they are literally true or false in todays age. There is a lot to be learned from the past. And someday if you are lucky enough to live that long, maybe your grandchildren will be upset with what you say.
  2. by   RunningWithScissors
    Ever keep tropical fish?

    Then you know what happens if the water temp gets too cool; it's called cold stress and your fish will end up with nasty fungal infections and the like.

    So, we believe, humans are also susceptable to cold stress and its implications.

    ALSO, never run with scissors.
  3. by   TazziRN
    Quote from futurenurse35
    in my opinion, i think going outside without proper attire and lead to a cold and the cold may eventually turn to pneumonia is not treated properly.

    according to wikepedia:
    pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the alveoli (microscopic air-filled sacs of the lung responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere) become inflamed and flooded with fluid. pneumonia can result from a variety of causes, including infection with bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. pneumonia may also occur from chemical or physical injury to the lungs, or indirectly due to another medical illness, such as lung cancer or alcohol abuse.
    but the cold air with or without wet hair does not give anyone an illness!!!!
  4. by   SaderNurse05
    Quote from TazziRN
    But the cold air with or without wet hair does not give anyone an illness!!!!


    Can't find the Yeah That icon but as usual Tazzi is right on.
  5. by   TazziRN
    Quote from SaderNurse05


    Can't find the Yeah That icon but as usual Tazzi is right on.

    *blush*

    Aw, shucks!
  6. by   CritterLover
    Quote from runningwithscissors
    ever keep tropical fish?

    then you know what happens if the water temp gets too cool; it's called cold stress and your fish will end up with nasty fungal infections and the like.

    so, we believe, humans are also susceptable to cold stress and its implications.

    also, never run with scissors.


    but they are cold-blooded.

    we are warm-blooded.

    totally different body chemistries.

    besides. honestly? i haven't used a hair-drier in about 18 years. seriously. and i've got long hair. back when i was in high school, i walked to school with wet hair. temperatures were often below freezing. when i'd get to school, my hair would be frozen.

    though i now live in a warmer climate, i still wash my hair before i go to work, and hope it is dry by the time i get their. sometimes it is, sometimes it isn't. pneumonia? never. a cold? rarely. now, those pesky allergies.......those are a different story. but, still not caused by either wet hair and/or cold weather.

  7. by   georgy
    its all the way ppl hav been thinking all these years..
    only few can change.
  8. by   RunningWithScissors
    originally posted by runningwithscissors
    ever keep tropical fish?

    then you know what happens if the water temp gets too cool; it's called cold stress and your fish will end up with nasty fungal infections and the like.

    so, we believe, humans are also susceptable to cold stress and its implications.

    also, never run with scissors.




    but they are cold-blooded.

    we are warm-blooded.
    ah yes, this is true, and you make a good point here.

    but in the same fish-keeping analogy, if the ph of the water in the tank is not within a specific range, the fish will die. the same with humans.

    just an observation.
  9. by   txspadequeenRN
    This thread has just become dumb..lol

    Quote from RunningWithScissors
    Ah yes, this is true, and you make a good point here.

    But in the same fish-keeping analogy, if the ph of the water in the tank is not within a specific range, the fish will die. The same with humans.

    Just an observation.
  10. by   txspadequeenRN
    If your theory is true then every time we are exposed to heat or cold we should drop dead because out PH is off....

    Quote from RunningWithScissors
    Ah yes, this is true, and you make a good point here.

    But in the same fish-keeping analogy, if the ph of the water in the tank is not within a specific range, the fish will die. The same with humans.

    Just an observation.
  11. by   txspadequeenRN
    therefore in the majoirty of pneumonia cases are caused by a bacteria or germ of some sort.... these things grow in warm atmospheres....not in cold.

    Quote from futurenurse35
    in my opinion, i think going outside without proper attire and lead to a cold and the cold may eventually turn to pneumonia is not treated properly.

    according to wikepedia:
    pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the alveoli (microscopic air-filled sacs of the lung responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere) become inflamed and flooded with fluid. pneumonia can result from a variety of causes, including infection with bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. pneumonia may also occur from chemical or physical injury to the lungs, or indirectly due to another medical illness, such as lung cancer or alcohol abuse.
  12. by   GooeyRN
    I don't even own a hair dryer. My hair never dries. I put it in a bun while wet, it is still wet when I let down at night. I have been doing it for years, regardless of the weather. I never had pneumonia, or even the flu. I don't believe cold weather is the cause of pneumonia. I would then think a coat and hair dryer would cure it, not antibiotics.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    I realize this is anecdotal . . .but I sent my two older boys to school with wet hair and in the winter, we get snow. I also send my 5 year old to school with wet hair. Very rarely do they get colds and NO pneumonia.

    You have to be exposed to a virus or a bacteria to get sick.

    Having a wet head might do it if my son rubbed his wet head against the snotty nose of a classmate with a cold and then sucked on his hair . . . . .

    steph

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