CNA's passing meds?

  1. 0 Reading thru some job descriptions, I noticed one that mentioned the CNA is responsible for medication pass. It is at a skilled nursing facility. I am looking for a part time CNA job while I finnish my RN program, but am a little uneasy about the idea of CNA's passing meds. Is the common? I understood that CNA's dont have the training neccesary. I don't think I'd feel comfortable as a CNA passing meds, have you seen or heard of this before?
  2. Visit  aachavez profile page

    About aachavez

    aachavez has '<1' year(s) of experience. From 'Brandon, FL (Tampa Bay Area)'; Joined Oct '11; Posts: 345; Likes: 176.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  selebra profile page
    0
    They are called QMAPs (Qualified Medication Administration Person). They go through a short training program to do medication passes. They are not allowed to give injections.
    Here is a website that details the program.

    Medication Administration Program
  4. Visit  Dixon, future NP profile page
    0
    Quote from aachavez
    Reading thru some job descriptions, I noticed one that mentioned the CNA is responsible for medication pass. It is at a skilled nursing facility. I am looking for a part time CNA job while I finnish my RN program, but am a little uneasy about the idea of CNA's passing meds. Is the common? I understood that CNA's dont have the training neccesary. I don't think I'd feel comfortable as a CNA passing meds, have you seen or heard of this before?
    Let me explain...a CNA can obtain a med-tech certificate which allows them to assist with self administered medications. So yes they pass meds but it's meds that are self administered and this can only be done in a nursing home or patients home.
  5. Visit  Despareux profile page
    0
    I have heard many CNA's say they have experience passing medications. I'm not doubting CNA's could pass medications if properly trained, but I do doubt a CNA's skills to assess appropriate perimeters per specific disease processes--unless they're a nursing student or an astoundingly brilliant human-being. If a facility is willing to overlook those kinds of legalities, just imagine what they do behind closed doors.
  6. Visit  Despareux profile page
    0
    I have never heard of a med-tech certificate. Is this type of certification available for every state?
  7. Visit  Dixon, future NP profile page
    0
    Quote from Dixon, future NP

    Let me explain...a CNA can obtain a med-tech certificate which allows them to assist with self administered medications. So yes they pass meds but it's meds that are self administered and this can only be done in a nursing home or patients home.
    This is in Florida.
  8. Visit  Dixon, future NP profile page
    0
    Quote from Despareux
    I have never heard of a med-tech certificate. Is this type of certification available for every state?
    This is in Florida.
  9. Visit  calinurse11 profile page
    0
    My cousin does this, she works assisted living and passed a two day course on medication administration. She now tells the family she does everything I do, but I just get paid more. We are in California.
  10. Visit  aachavez profile page
    0
    Thank you so much for clearing this up! I am in Florida, so having that training available makes SO much more sense.

    I have heard many CNA's say they have experience passing medications. I'm not doubting CNA's could pass medications if properly trained, but I do doubt a CNA's skills to assess appropriate perimeters per specific disease processes--unless they're a nursing student or an astoundingly brilliant human-being. If a facility is willing to overlook those kinds of legalities, just imagine what they do behind closed doors.

    ^My thoughts exactly! Nothing against CNA's, I have clinical with some wonderful CNAs, and they are fantastic at what they do. But even with that extra cert, do they know enough to take an apical pulse before giving digoxin? Or when to hold other meds? Or what implications to look for?

    Anyhow, Thanks Everyone for the feedback!
  11. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    0
    Next they'll let CNAs become certified in wound care. Or respiratory care. The logical conclusion of all this is going to be nursing homes having maybe one nurse a shift to "supervise" all the specially "certified" aides doing all the actual nursing care....
  12. Visit  eCCU profile page
    0
    Quote from aachavez
    Thank you so much for clearing this up! I am in Florida, so having that training available makes SO much more sense.

    I have heard many CNA's say they have experience passing medications. I'm not doubting CNA's could pass medications if properly trained, but I do doubt a CNA's skills to assess appropriate perimeters per specific disease processes--unless they're a nursing student or an astoundingly brilliant human-being. If a facility is willing to overlook those kinds of legalities, just imagine what they do behind closed doors.

    ^My thoughts exactly! Nothing against CNA's, I have clinical with some wonderful CNAs, and they are fantastic at what they do. But even with that extra cert, do they know enough to take an apical pulse before giving digoxin? Or when to hold other meds? Or what implications to look for?

    Anyhow, Thanks Everyone for the feedback!
    I was a med tech in assisted living before going to Nursing school. The good thing i remember is that we had a parameter for almost every medicine we gave. But far from knowing the patho and mode of action! We had a really good RN though that answered any question we had.
  13. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    0
    When I worked in assisted living, caregivers and LNAs with the right training could pass meds, including insulin and suppositories.
  14. Visit  medic0681 profile page
    0
    NC has "med techs"..I wouldn't want that responsibility for $10/hr. just another way to increase profit margins


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close