Can LPN be supervisor to another LPN?

  1. Hi everyone. I work in a facility in Ohio and the nurses talk back and forth saying it is against Ohio law for an LPN to be a Unit Manager over other LPNs. I was wondering if they're right? I would think the facility would know they can't do that? Any help?

    Thanks!
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Check with the Ohio Board of Nursing.

    I am in Texas and, yes, LVNs are allowed to supervise other LVNs. In fact, the three ADONs (assistant directors of nursing) at my workplace are all LVNs.
  4. by   SCRN1
    Yeah, I'd check with your State Board of Nursing. Here, LPNs cannot do initial assessments, among a multitude of other things and each patient has to be assigned to an RN at least one shift every 24 hours. If it's the same where there, I don't understand how they could be a Unit Manager or a DON if they, themselves aren't allowed to preform all tasks that nurses have to. However, we can have LPNs orienting another LPN to the unit.
  5. by   WahooRN08
    YEP, all you need is an RN to co-sign. I supervise at an SNF now.
  6. by   WahooRN08
    I have also oriented RN's before.......Virginia is wide open with LPN's. It is up to the hospitals and SNF's state to decide the bounds of LPN practice.
  7. by   txspadequeenRN
    The commuter is talking about LTC. LVN's are able to do the initial assessment and do not need a RN to sign off on their work. Of course this is Texas and the scope for a LVN is wide and it also depends on your policy and procedures for your facility. Very often LVN's are ADON's but the only time they serve as DON's is in ALF's.


    Quote from SCRN1
    Yeah, I'd check with your State Board of Nursing. Here, LPNs cannot do initial assessments, among a multitude of other things and each patient has to be assigned to an RN at least one shift every 24 hours. If it's the same where there, I don't understand how they could be a Unit Manager or a DON if they, themselves aren't allowed to preform all tasks that nurses have to. However, we can have LPNs orienting another LPN to the unit.
  8. by   jemommyRN
    At the LTC facility I work at, the nurse supervisor is an LPN.
  9. by   cant_not
    I’m originally from West Virginia, and back there LPN’s could not supervise other LPN’s, nor could they be in any kind of director position. I currently reside in KY, and the Unit Manager at a facility I worked at recently was an LPN, I thought it was rather weird, because she had authority over RN’s that worked on my unit; Which is totally backwards if you ask me.
  10. by   SCRN1
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    The commuter is talking about LTC. LVN's are able to do the initial assessment and do not need a RN to sign off on their work. Of course this is Texas and the scope for a LVN is wide and it also depends on your policy and procedures for your facility. Very often LVN's are ADON's but the only time they serve as DON's is in ALF's.
    She said facility, so I did not know for sure that she was talking about LTC. Anyway, that's why I said she should check with her State Board. I have never worked in LTC, but from what I've heard from fellow nurses here who have, LPNs can give care. But an RN is required to be in charge. Just what I've been told.
  11. by   txspadequeenRN
    A lot of times there is no RN in the building but there is always one just a phone call away. And there has to be one in the building for at least 8 hours a day. In LTC 90% of the charge nurses are LVN's, now of course things are completely different in the hospital.

    Quote from SCRN1
    She said facility, so I did not know for sure that she was talking about LTC. Anyway, that's why I said she should check with her State Board. I have never worked in LTC, but from what I've heard from fellow nurses here who have, LPNs can give care. But an RN is required to be in charge. Just what I've been told.
  12. by   SCRN1
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    A lot of times there is no RN in the building but there is always one just a phone call away. And there has to be one in the building for at least 8 hours a day. In LTC 90% of the charge nurses are LVN's, now of course things are completely different in the hospital.

    LOL, in my last reply, I was talking about what I'd been told how it is in LTCs in MY state. I know there are differences in hospitals & LTC. I was talking about how it is here in my state. Different states and different facilities within the states have different laws/rules. That's why I said in my original reply that she should check with HER State Board.
    Last edit by SCRN1 on Dec 8, '06 : Reason: left out a word
  13. by   noBS N
    In a home health type facility where I used to volunteer there was a LPN who was an ADON. La

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