Can anyone tell me what a HCA or PSW scope of practice?

  1. 0 Hi

    nursing student here, year 2. just got hired as a Health Care Aide (still waiting for my references to go thru) but i was wondering what exactly is the specific scope of practice for a HCA/PSW? I cant seem to find the specific information on google.

    All i was told is that you cannot cut the clients nails and cannot give meds. Can you do vitals and take BP, etc? Im just confused because im in a nursing BSCN degree and it seems that they are very limited and i keep confusing what i can and cannot do.

    Thanks!
  2. Visit  student456 profile page

    About student456

    Joined Sep '06; Posts: 298; Likes: 104.

    11 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  DusktilDawn profile page
    0
    Look at the facility's job description and policies. Have you checked out the Regulated Health Professions Act? I could be mistaken, but I thought in order to work as HCA or PSW in Canada you had to have taken a certified course?

    BTW, nurses are not supposed to cut nails either.
    Last edit by DusktilDawn on Mar 22, '07
  4. Visit  student456 profile page
    0
    Its a nursing agency that hired me. In Canada, alot of LTC and agencies will hire nursing students after year 2 of schooling as a HCA. Some require a certificate/ but some will hire you.
  5. Visit  student456 profile page
    0
    Its a nursing agency that hired me. In Canada, alot of LTC and agencies will hire nursing students after year 2 of schooling as a HCA. Some require a certificate/ but some will hire you.
  6. Visit  DusktilDawn profile page
    0
    Quote from muhaha
    Its a nursing agency that hired me. In Canada, alot of LTC and agencies will hire nursing students after year 2 of schooling as a HCA. Some require a certificate/ but some will hire you.
    I wasn't sure, but I'm glad that they will hire nursing students because it can be a beneficial experience.
  7. Visit  scizzerin profile page
    0
    I am a PSP (patient support partner) They name us different in whatever facility, because I've heard it many ways. I am a certified nursing assistant (CNA) went through a training course for that certification. I am not in nursing school yet, still working on my prerequisites. We do vitals, blood sugars, bathing and what not, basically being the wind beneath nurses wings (good ones...but that's another story) I've held my position for almost 6 months, but soon I'll be eligible to go through a hospital training to do blood draws and insert & remove foley catheters. I don't know how different it is in a LTCF, as I work in a hospital (ICU/PCU) I agree with the above poster about checking out the facilities' job description. Good luck! You'll learn so much more actually being there and doing it. I swear I never leave a shift without feeling like I've learned something new.
  8. Visit  pagandeva2000 profile page
    0
    From what it seems to me, it is working as a nursing assistant, just at the home. You are not supposed to give medications, unless you are certified by the agency that hired you. Some facilities do, in fact, train their aides to administer oral medications (the title I did this under was called a certified AMAP). Until you receive your license, you may be limited to ADLs and escorting patients to their clinic appointments, supermarket, etc. It can be a great opportunity to learn nursing from the ground up. In most cases, the pay is not much, but you will learn how to deal with people during their illness. You'll probably be trained to take vitals. It is new to me to hear that they are doing fingersticks, but that is not a surprize, because that is an easy, no risk skill for the most part.
  9. Visit  Cattitude profile page
    0
    in my agency the home aides do adl's, light houskeeping, prepare meals, and escort pt's outdoors/to appt's. they can only remind pt's to take meds and not actually give meds.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]some aides can assist pt's with a home exercise program (hep). there are 2 different levels of aides hha and pca. but this is the us and canada may certainly be different.
    [color=#483d8b]
    [color=#483d8b]
  10. Visit  student456 profile page
    0
    in ontario canada at least we arent even allowed to take blood glucose finger sticks until AFTER we graduate and are "certified" in doing so. I was surprised to see that usa nursing students can do it while we cant. I guess it depends on what country you go to nursing school in. i wish we were able to do it though!
  11. Visit  DusktilDawn profile page
    0
    Quote from muhaha
    in ontario canada at least we arent even allowed to take blood glucose finger sticks until AFTER we graduate and are "certified" in doing so. I was surprised to see that usa nursing students can do it while we cant. I guess it depends on what country you go to nursing school in. i wish we were able to do it though!
    Actually that surprises me. I'm baffled. I graduated ('02) from a Diploma program and nursing students were allowed to do them, at least the ones going through the college at that time. When I worked as an RPN, the college instructors would ask who had chemsticks so the students could do them. I never worked with anyone that had to be certified to do chemsticks when I was working in Canada (employed in the States since '03). Is this something new?

    BTW I do live in Ontario.
  12. Visit  LadyLurker profile page
    0
    I work with HCAs, PSWs, and degree RN students hired as "care attendents". They provide most of the hands-on care that our residents require: AM/HS care, baths/showers, mouth/denture care, transport via WC or walker to meals, toileting, feeding, meal set-up etc. They can change colostomy appliances, take vitals and weights, get glucometer readings after I've trained them, and watched them, apply certain treatment creams... that sort of thing. ADLs.
    They take a very basic segment in their course on med administration, but the only place they are allowed to give meds is in group homes. They NEVER give out meds in LTC. And they cannot be trained to, at this time.

    I expect the degree students to ask me what they can and cannot do, and I will happily explain that to them. They will also tell you during your orientation process what is within your scope.
    I enjoy have the nursing students work with us, because *I* feel it gives them experience in hands-on care and time management that they don't always get in the degree program. Their "reality shock" is somewhat less when they graduate.
    And yes, I'm a diploma RN. LOL!

    karen
    ladylurker
  13. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    Quote from muhaha
    Hi

    nursing student here, year 2. just got hired as a Health Care Aide (still waiting for my references to go thru) but i was wondering what exactly is the specific scope of practice for a HCA/PSW? I cant seem to find the specific information on google.

    I think it is good for you to work as a care worker because too many university students just don't have the basic hands on skills required today due to the very short clinicals some have. By attending to the basic needs of a patient you have a good look at the overall patient, skin condition, bowel and bladder issues, just how well they can participate in ADLs, an idea of the personality and any issues they may have.

    All i was told is that you cannot cut the clients nails and cannot give meds. Can you do vitals and take BP, etc? Im just confused because im in a nursing BSCN degree and it seems that they are very limited and i keep confusing what i can and cannot do.

    Thanks!
    Like the other Canadians have said it really depends on where you work. Aides out here can only supervise at home clients taking their meds (ie taking the cap off the syringe, watching them swallow) or apply some topicals. They can do blood sugars after on site training. Depending on the patient the nail thing is an issue that bothers working nurses. Families can do this for them. If they are diabetic or elderly with toenail issues, they really should be cared for by a podiatrist.

    Yes, it is very limited because you are still a student, you are an unregulated health care worker. Many students feel that because they are in their second year, they should be "allowed" to work as PN's, but the training is different after four semesters a PN is working independently in their scope of practice, you as a RN student are still learning.
    Last edit by Fiona59 on Mar 23, '07


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close