Can anyone tell me what a HCA or PSW scope of practice?

  1. 0
    Hi

    nursing student here, year 2. just got hired as a Health Care Aide (still waiting for my references to go thru) but i was wondering what exactly is the specific scope of practice for a HCA/PSW? I cant seem to find the specific information on google.

    All i was told is that you cannot cut the clients nails and cannot give meds. Can you do vitals and take BP, etc? Im just confused because im in a nursing BSCN degree and it seems that they are very limited and i keep confusing what i can and cannot do.

    Thanks!

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  2. 11 Comments...

  3. 0
    Look at the facility's job description and policies. Have you checked out the Regulated Health Professions Act? I could be mistaken, but I thought in order to work as HCA or PSW in Canada you had to have taken a certified course?

    BTW, nurses are not supposed to cut nails either.
    Last edit by DusktilDawn on Mar 22, '07
  4. 0
    Its a nursing agency that hired me. In Canada, alot of LTC and agencies will hire nursing students after year 2 of schooling as a HCA. Some require a certificate/ but some will hire you.
  5. 0
    Its a nursing agency that hired me. In Canada, alot of LTC and agencies will hire nursing students after year 2 of schooling as a HCA. Some require a certificate/ but some will hire you.
  6. 0
    Quote from muhaha
    Its a nursing agency that hired me. In Canada, alot of LTC and agencies will hire nursing students after year 2 of schooling as a HCA. Some require a certificate/ but some will hire you.
    I wasn't sure, but I'm glad that they will hire nursing students because it can be a beneficial experience.
  7. 0
    I am a PSP (patient support partner) They name us different in whatever facility, because I've heard it many ways. I am a certified nursing assistant (CNA) went through a training course for that certification. I am not in nursing school yet, still working on my prerequisites. We do vitals, blood sugars, bathing and what not, basically being the wind beneath nurses wings (good ones...but that's another story) I've held my position for almost 6 months, but soon I'll be eligible to go through a hospital training to do blood draws and insert & remove foley catheters. I don't know how different it is in a LTCF, as I work in a hospital (ICU/PCU) I agree with the above poster about checking out the facilities' job description. Good luck! You'll learn so much more actually being there and doing it. I swear I never leave a shift without feeling like I've learned something new.
  8. 0
    From what it seems to me, it is working as a nursing assistant, just at the home. You are not supposed to give medications, unless you are certified by the agency that hired you. Some facilities do, in fact, train their aides to administer oral medications (the title I did this under was called a certified AMAP). Until you receive your license, you may be limited to ADLs and escorting patients to their clinic appointments, supermarket, etc. It can be a great opportunity to learn nursing from the ground up. In most cases, the pay is not much, but you will learn how to deal with people during their illness. You'll probably be trained to take vitals. It is new to me to hear that they are doing fingersticks, but that is not a surprize, because that is an easy, no risk skill for the most part.
  9. 0
    in my agency the home aides do adl's, light houskeeping, prepare meals, and escort pt's outdoors/to appt's. they can only remind pt's to take meds and not actually give meds.
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    [color=#483d8b]some aides can assist pt's with a home exercise program (hep). there are 2 different levels of aides hha and pca. but this is the us and canada may certainly be different.
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  10. 0
    in ontario canada at least we arent even allowed to take blood glucose finger sticks until AFTER we graduate and are "certified" in doing so. I was surprised to see that usa nursing students can do it while we cant. I guess it depends on what country you go to nursing school in. i wish we were able to do it though!
  11. 0
    Quote from muhaha
    in ontario canada at least we arent even allowed to take blood glucose finger sticks until AFTER we graduate and are "certified" in doing so. I was surprised to see that usa nursing students can do it while we cant. I guess it depends on what country you go to nursing school in. i wish we were able to do it though!
    Actually that surprises me. I'm baffled. I graduated ('02) from a Diploma program and nursing students were allowed to do them, at least the ones going through the college at that time. When I worked as an RPN, the college instructors would ask who had chemsticks so the students could do them. I never worked with anyone that had to be certified to do chemsticks when I was working in Canada (employed in the States since '03). Is this something new?

    BTW I do live in Ontario.


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