California RN License Applications Doubled Since the Passing of Nurse/Patient Ratio B

  1. Since the passing of the new nurse/patient ratio bill
    the California Board of Nursing recently announced that CA license applications of RNs from other states has doubled over the last 3 months. One local nursing agency had over 200 applicants, many older returning bedside nurses. Nevada is experiencing a huge shortage because of nurses crossing the boarder to work in California. This out to be a wake-up call to other states!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   Nemhain
    This is EXACTLY what I predicted would happen!!! :chuckle I even said to my clinical group 2 months ago, "watch, this year California will have nurses coming out of the woodwork because of the new ratio."

    See what happens when nurses are given reasonable working conditions.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Nemhain
    See what happens when nurses are given reasonable working conditions.
    Yes. But as other threads have pointed out, hospitals are also cutting back on support staff to pay for the additional nurses. I can't help but wonder if the ratios really do much good, that is, if the nurses' work load is increased with the support cutbacks. It would be interesting to hear feedback on this question.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 16, '04
  5. by   Ortho_RN
    Yeah.. I can see where it would be great if they left the same support staff... But if I went from having 10pts to 6 or 7, with no LPN or Aide.. Then I think I would rather have more patients with adequate help..
  6. by   Mantibob
    Are the hospitals really cutting back on support staff. I just do not understand the mentallity of the hospitals. You got these large hospital groups with CEOs , board members and administrators making millions in salary and bonuses and perks and they have to skrimp at the expense of nurses, wich ultimately puts the patients at risk. If you took the profit motive out of hospitals than maybe healthcare personell would make a decent salary and have a livable workload. They nickle and dime the front lines so they can have there big bucks. I have seen salary surveys where all the nurses salary in one hospital put together added up to 1-2 percent of total operations cost. The same surveys show that top administration, board members and top executives pull in 5-6 percent in salarys and benifits. If the top took a 1/2 percent cut, (I think they would survive), and it was put to CNAs and support staff than they would not be killing off the nurses. What do ya think, am I just being nieve?
  7. by   mayberry
    I work on an IMCU where I routinely have 6 pts. Would LOVE to have the 4 pts out policy states we're supposed to have, techs or not. Nurse/Pt. are a great idea and we as "professionals" need to find a better way to get that message out to the public. (As opposed to letting Administration and the MD's do it for us - NOT!!!)
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Mantibob
    Are the hospitals really cutting back on support staff. I just do not understand the mentallity of the hospitals. You got these large hospital groups with CEOs , board members and administrators making millions in salary and bonuses and perks and they have to skrimp at the expense of nurses, wich ultimately puts the patients at risk. If you took the profit motive out of hospitals than maybe healthcare personell would make a decent salary and have a livable workload. They nickle and dime the front lines so they can have there big bucks. I have seen salary surveys where all the nurses salary in one hospital put together added up to 1-2 percent of total operations cost. The same surveys show that top administration, board members and top executives pull in 5-6 percent in salarys and benifits. If the top took a 1/2 percent cut, (I think they would survive), and it was put to CNAs and support staff than they would not be killing off the nurses. What do ya think, am I just being nieve?
    Seems logical. But that's the way every corporation seems to do it these days, whether it's medical or not. The standard procedure seems to be layoff or cut salaries for the rank and file, and keep paying the top people top dollar.

    I'm not sure if removing the profit motive always helps, however. There is one non-profit hospital in my area that is, by most accounts, a mess and has the same problems. They're losing a ton money and, from what I hear, the working conditions are not good.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 17, '04
  9. by   joiedevivre
    Help me understand some of these dynamics. We are a booming small town in Northern Cal with great affordable housing (by CA standards anyway), offer relo of up to $10,000, loan forgiveness study programs and debt repayments programs, have competitive benefits, train new grads in ICU, CVICU, paying for all their courses, personalized orientation, our facilities are high-tech in a rural setting, surrounded by lakes, rivers and great outdoor living opportunities, are new grad friendly, pay starts at $25.00/hr excluding diffs, have night shift bonuses - gosh is there anything more to give or offer? However, our recruitment department says they advertise in all the snow-bogged places on the East Coast, all the poorer paying areas, and are not able to entice the number of RNs they need to fill those positions. I am assuming that most CA hospitals can say the same judging by the vacancy rates, so what makes CA attractive to a few, but not the masses Administrators seem to think ought to be enticed by these wonderful options and benefits. Any thoughts? Maybe it is time for the left hand siders to see what keeps the East Coasters and Mid-Westerners from streaming into our hospitals, especially with legislated ratios now that ensure a more manageable workload. Any thoughts? Are those doubled applications travelers and/or foreign nurses predominantly?
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I would love to go to Ca to work, but can't exactly leave my husband to do it! lol.

    When I worked med-surg, I routinely had 8-9 pts, no CNA, no LPN, no unit clerk, no housekeeping, no dietary, no respiratory. Needless to say, it was a living nightmare.

    Having only 5-6 pts in med-surg, support staff or not, sounds like a dream to me!

    Give it time-

    "If you enact and enforce ratios, they will come...."
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I would love to go to Ca to work, but can't exactly leave my husband to do it! lol.
    Too bad. It would be fun to have you out here. Maybe that bedpan would be half full.

    Or, maybe not ...

    Like the song says ... California dreamin' ...
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from joiedevivre
    Help me understand some of these dynamics. We are a booming small town in Northern Cal with great affordable housing (by CA standards anyway), offer relo of up to $10,000, loan forgiveness study programs and debt repayments programs, have competitive benefits, train new grads in ICU, CVICU, paying for all their courses, personalized orientation, our facilities are high-tech in a rural setting, surrounded by lakes, rivers and great outdoor living opportunities, are new grad friendly, pay starts at $25.00/hr excluding diffs, have night shift bonuses - gosh is there anything more to give or offer? However, our recruitment department says they advertise in all the snow-bogged places on the East Coast, all the poorer paying areas, and are not able to entice the number of RNs they need to fill those positions. I am assuming that most CA hospitals can say the same judging by the vacancy rates, so what makes CA attractive to a few, but not the masses Administrators seem to think ought to be enticed by these wonderful options and benefits. Any thoughts? Maybe it is time for the left hand siders to see what keeps the East Coasters and Mid-Westerners from streaming into our hospitals, especially with legislated ratios now that ensure a more manageable workload. Any thoughts? Are those doubled applications travelers and/or foreign nurses predominantly?
    Geez. What town are you talking about? And what's the average price of a home there?

    :spin:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 17, '04
  13. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from lizz
    Too bad. It would be fun to have you out here. Maybe that bedpan would be half full.

    Or, maybe not ...

    Like the song says ... California dreamin' ...
    Lol, thank you, lizz!
    My thoughts on the bedpan- we know about seeing the glass as "half full or half empty". My question is- what's in the glass?


    I have an RN friend in KS who is excited about the Ca ratios. She wants to try a travel position to Ca to check it out, before she commits to relocating for a perm position.
    She's a psych RN, over 20 years experience in psych (mostly gero), as well as several years in hospice, LTC, and home-care peds.

    Trouble is- all the jobs are for acute-care hospital nurses. She hasn't been able to find a travel job in her areas of nursing.


    I have looked into short-term travel dialysis nursing positions in Ca, but none of the agencies I've contacted have contacted me back. :/


    Again, this gets me wondering about the reality of the shortage.
  14. by   joiedevivre
    Quote from lizz
    Geez. What town are you talking about? And what's the average price of a home there?

    :spin:
    Approx 45 mins from Sacramento - median home price is $165,000

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