But she's not a nurse! - page 11

I just started a new position running a clinic. The clinic is staffed by myself and one CNA. I am so happy to be working with this CNA as she has over 15 years experience working in this clinic and... Read More

  1. by   ckirby
    how 'bout this, when she started nurses didn't always go to school many became nurses by OJT
  2. by   StrawberryBSN
    originally posted by itsjustmezoe
    :chuckle so you liked rnitis: the action of a rn when position is questioned and the rn in question must state her quailifications all the way down to how many butts she has wipped in his / her career to a fellow employee.
    ie: to inflame a registered nurse
    zoe
    first signs and symptoms...a rash or self righteousness? let me guess!!!!! (hahaha)

    s_bsn
  3. by   bblou
    You go girl! Well said. I agree with you.
  4. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas

    Well flowerchild I hope you euther stroke you keys very lightly or you have a padded keyboard. because that much typing you do would hurt my fingertips.

    you tell them ckirby. Nurses also used to be the former prostitutes who followed the armies centuries ago and even up to the civil war.. documented in history books
  5. by   kimmee64
    I waited awhile before I replied to this, but it seems to me that people are to hung up on who is the most educated. I am a nurse with 2 other degrees. Does this make me more important than a nurse with one degree. I am a very good nurse and it would not bother me at all to be in this situation. I would be grateful to have such great help. I have confidence in myself, therefore I am not jealous of anyone else. Also, apparently the owner of this clinic values this person greatly. This is the same line of thinking that causes doctors to think they are better/smarter than nurses. Hope I have not offended anyone. Just my opinion.
  6. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas

    Well flowerchild I hope you euther stroke you keys very lightly or you have a padded keyboard. because that much typing you do would hurt my fingertips.

    you tell them ckirby. Nurses also used to be the former prostitutes who followed the armies centuries ago and even up to the civil war.. documented in history books


    Nurses in the 50's who grandfatherd from NA's
    didn't have anywhere the responsibility and the liability RN's do now. It's a whole different ballgame today...Tom I'm so surprised you're brushing this off...

    Flowerchild is legally responsible for all the care provided in that clinic, I would bet my booty.

    And speaking of booty, I sure am glad we don't meet our patient's 'every need' like the first nurses (unfortunately )did... :imbar
  7. by   LG1
    I am a paramedic who operates a school clinic. I have posted that I am a paramedic and not an RN, however for 3 years now, I am still called the "nurse" by parents. I do correct them, however, I think that the term "nurse" that lay people use is not directed to be of an specific degree. People often associate people in the medical field as "nurses". This would seem to be the situation more than her taking credit for a degree she has not earned.

    I also think that you should relax and not think that people are "lower" because they didnt go to the same school or as long as you. The program I competed is equivalent in credit hours and time as the asn program at most schools. My training is just different. (I'm sure I am offending someone) but get over it.
  8. by   Q.
    Originally posted by teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas

    Well flowerchild I hope you euther stroke you keys very lightly or you have a padded keyboard. because that much typing you do would hurt my fingertips.

    you tell them ckirby. Nurses also used to be the former prostitutes who followed the armies centuries ago and even up to the civil war.. documented in history books
    I believe that we have moved beyond this era you mentioned above; I agree with MattsMom, nurses have a helluva lot more responsibility now then back then.

    Flowerchild, EXCELLENT post and I applaud you. You respect the nursing profession.

    For all others who disagree with her, I find it hard to believe you would encourage intentionally misleading and lying to a patient about a person's credentials.
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by mattsmom81
    The liberal use of the term 'nurse' and the public's tendency to think everyone in a scrub is a 'nurse' does NOT benefit us as professionals. When nurses can get together on this, we will make some progress as professionals.

    It only helps management's bottom line...$$$$$.....and turfs responsibility for UAP's to the RN on duty. Who is benefitting????

    Follow the money...
    Couldn't have said it better. Management gets the benefit of patients thinking the place is staffed with nurses but doesn't have to pay for that.
  10. by   Stargazer
    Originally posted by Susy K For all others who disagree with her, I find it hard to believe you would encourage intentionally misleading and lying to a patient about a person's credentials.
    THANK you! I was pounding my head on my desk yesterday reading the last few comments, completely dumbfounded that people seemed inclined to simply brush this off as unimportant.

    It's not about superiority complexes or who's "better". People are entitled, both as patients and as healthcare consumers, to know the general/relative educational level and/or licensure status of their caregivers. From a medical ethics standpoint, much less a legal one, I am incredulous that anyone would think it was okay to fail to disclose this status, or worse, to blur the lines between differing professionals' Practice Acts so that patients would be unable to tell the difference.
  11. by   idonurses
    Forget the title! They know who the Boss is?
  12. by   Q.
    I NEVER like to make assumptions about a person's credentials. And as a patient, I would HATE to be intentionally mislead. As a patient I demand to know who is taking care of me.
  13. by   StrawberryBSN
    flowerchild, i think you handled the situation with tact, and the outcome was good. i agree that staff should never be misleading as to what thier training and titles are.

    i just feel bad for judy that for some reason or another, she has been comfortable telling people that she is a nurse and allowing people to call her a nurse. on a deeper level (psych-soc? ha!), seems like there's an esteem issue or something else going on that ties into her reason for not being ok with just "cna"(my guess). what do you beleive her honest to goodness bottom line reason is for wanting to call herself nurse? (i'm really asking a question without knowing the answer other than my guess upstairs!)

    yes, the nurses here that say she shouldn't call herself a nurse are right...she shouldn't. i think that flowerchild handled the situation with care and respect, and its been resolved. some posts that i have read seem to say "to hell with judy...change it, she'll get over it". that's when i say give judy a break, and ask those who feel that way to look within to ask what's important, "penal code 8.22069 of thei said so act has been broken" along with the impact of embarrassing a great employee or letting her call herself whatever she wants, as long as its clear on her badge and handouts who she really is.

    my opinion, just something to consider!

    s_bsn

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