Assessment of light reaction of pupil - page 3

In a normal situation, when a torch shines light on the pupil, the pupil constricts. If the torch is not moved away and continues to shine the pupil, what will happen to the pupil size?... Read More

  1. Visit  tkyeung profile page
    0
    Quote from sapphire18
    Yes. If a pupil ever changes size it is "reactive". It is only nonreactive or "fixed" if it stays the same size no matter what amount of light it is exposed to.
    Quote from Esme12
    A non reactive pupil will not change with any light source...ever. It does not dilate in darkness nor will it constrict in light. It stays the same.

    Once the pupil changes at all to a light source it is reactive.
    As said above, if the pupil changes upon the shining of light, then it is reactive?
    Last edit by tkyeung on Mar 16, '14 : Reason: addition of comments
  2. Visit  CodeteamB profile page
    5
    Quote from tkyeung
    As said above, if the pupil changes upon the shining of light, then it is reactive?
    Asked and answered.

    Life (nursing) is not that simple. Charting a paradoxical dilatation as "reactive" is simply, flat-out, incorrect and no one on this thread has advised that you do so.

    I'm not sure I can explain any better.

    If you are still confused I advise you do some independent research. If you have made up your mind to chart only by tickbox despite your actual findings I advise you invest in malpractice insurance.
    KelRN215, JustBeachyNurse, Esme12, and 2 others like this.
  3. Visit  tkyeung profile page
    0
    but the pupil dilates in response to light is also a reaction of the pupil to light, right? reactive to light does not necessarily mean the the pupil constricts with light, it only means pupil has reaction towards light?
  4. Visit  IrishErin profile page
    0
    Quote from tkyeung
    but the pupil dilates in response to light is also a reaction of the pupil to light, right? reactive to light does not necessarily mean the the pupil constricts with light, it only means pupil has reaction towards light?
    You've been given several great answers to this repetitive question a few times already.
  5. Visit  tkyeung profile page
    0
    To sum up, is the following statement correct?When light is shone on the pupil, if the pupil remains the same, no response occurs, then it is non-reactive; If light is shone on the pupil, it changes in size to the light source (constricts or enlarges) , it is reactive.
  6. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    normal reaction is when the pupil constricts. If it dilated that is an abnormal reaction. note it in your narrative.

    In an afferent pupillary defect there is a decreased direct response caused by decreased visual function in one eye. This can be demonstrated with the swinging flashlight test, in which the light is moved back and forth between the eyes every two to three seconds. The afferent pupillary defect becomes obvious when the flashlight is moved from the normal to the affected eye, and the affected pupil dilates in response to light. Under normal conditions, the pupil constricts in response to light.
    Afferent Pupillary Defects

    An afferent pupillary defect test is an important physical sign in an evaluation for neurologic disease. A relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) is an objective sign of unilateral or asymmetric disease of the optic nerve head or retina. The visual acuity does not necessarily correlate with an RAPD. If there is an RAPD with good central vision, you are likely dealing with optic nerve diseases and not retinal diseases. Usually retinal disease has to be quite severe for an RAPD to be clinically evident. In addition, there are many conditions with a severe vision loss, but without an RAPD, such conditions are a complete vitreous hemorrhage and hyphema.

    http://www.pacificu.edu/optometry/ce...pilanompg2.cfm
    Mn nurse 22 likes this.
  7. Visit  sapphire18 profile page
    2
    You are most likely never going to see a pupil dilate in response to light. Don't worry about that possibility- just cross that bridge if/when you come to it.
    Mn nurse 22 and JustBeachyNurse like this.
  8. Visit  tkyeung profile page
    0
    so is my statement correct? when there is a change in pupil size with the light source, it is reactive.Even when it dilates, it is reactive though it is an abnormal reaction.
  9. Visit  Mn nurse 22 profile page
    4
    No your statement is not correct.

    This has been explained to you over and over.
    I have read through your other posts where you were just as argumentative as you continue to be on this issue.
    It is very frustrating that you keep trying to twist people's words around.
  10. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    What is this for? It is NOT plain nor simple

    In a way, technically yes the pupil moves to light means it reacts but the term reactive indicates normalcy which dilation to light is not.
    Mn nurse 22 likes this.
  11. Visit  tkyeung profile page
    0
    In my hospital, the assessment form only allows me to fill in reactive (十sign)or non reactive(-sign) for pupil reaction. Therefore i must choose reactive if reaction takes place, non reactive if no reaction takes place.
  12. Visit  JustBeachyNurse profile page
    4
    Quote from tkyeung
    In my hospital, the assessment form only allows me to fill in reactive (十sign)or non reactive(-sign) for pupil reaction. Therefore i must choose reactive if reaction takes place, non reactive if no reaction takes place.
    What does your nurse manager, hospital policy and/or clinical nurse educator instruct in such a scenario? Again it's likely not an issue as if you have a patient with pupils that dilate in response to bright light which box to tick will be the least of your issues but all nursing documentation whether handwritten of electronic should have the option for a narrative explanation of findings outside normal limitations. There is no need to complicate the potential circumstance further.

    Based upon your syntax and incessant need to oversimplify are you in the US and/or is English your first language? Your linguistic skills seem to be a major comprehension barrier
    KelRN215, MrChicagoRN, sapphire18, and 1 other like this.
  13. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from tkyeung
    In my hospital, the assessment form only allows me to fill in reactive (十sign)or non reactive(-sign) for pupil reaction. Therefore i must choose reactive if reaction takes place, non reactive if no reaction takes place.
    then you need to seek the advice of your peers, manager, or educator.

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