Am I Nurse Material??

  1. I have been accepted to begin the Nursing Program in the Spring. I have attained a degree in Accounting and Psychology but am still drawn to Nursing. I don't know if I would be a good floor nurse because as I have gotten older my stomach has weakened and the idea of giving a shot freaks me out. Are these fears something that I would overcome during clinicals? Also, I am 45 and the thought of memorizing all those drugs is overwhelming. I have recently attended college and maintained a 4.0 up to now. Anybody out there who has found themselves in a similar position or who can offer wise advise?
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   KJB_65
    Its never too late to do something you want to do. I believe that you can do this. I know there are a lot of non traditional and "older" students here. The shots and yuck stuff that you encounter get easier, I think. They did for me anyway. Good luck to you. I think you'll do great.
  4. by   rn-jane
    If that's what you want to do then GO FOR IT!!!! It might be advisable for you to get a job as a cna when you get into nursing school to give you more experience. I think nurses that have worked as an aide are more successful in orientation and really do better in school as well.
  5. by   miss_anneRN
    shadrach,
    congrats on the 4.0!!! I went to school while I had 2 young kids, a recent divorce, working full time and a failed semester (or two!). Passing was suffient for me. I did pass the boards on the 1st try!
    These fears you have are universal, whether one is 20 or 45!!!!!
    Memorizing drugs is not totally necessary, i've been on the floor 6yrs and still find my nose in a drug book every shift. Hopefully you won't loose these fears because fear makes one practice more safely. Every nurse has the 1 or 2 things they just can't stand doing, even after decades. As far as becoming more comfortable during clinicals... personaly, I never felt comfortable @ clinicals. You have to practice a skill and be tested on it in front of instructors before it can be performed at clinicals.
    In my nursing class there was a women aged 62 who went back to school after her hubby died.
    I guess I really haven't offered advice, just observations.
    Your psych degree will you be great with psych cases, dementia, and grieving families, and weird family dynamics. Your acounting degree will be helpful in calculating doses, drip rates, holiday pay, shift diff
    THINK OF ALL YOU HAVE TO OFFER!!! Two degrees & life experience. You'll be a great addition.
    anne
  6. by   Mommy2NQ
    I think you will be just fine. Your grades are excellent and you seem focused. In time you will be comfortable giving shots and everything else that goes along with nursing that you won't think anything of it. Go for it!
  7. by   swee2000
    Quote from Shadrach
    I have been accepted to begin the Nursing Program in the Spring. I have attained a degree in Accounting and Psychology but am still drawn to Nursing. I don't know if I would be a good floor nurse because as I have gotten older my stomach has weakened and the idea of giving a shot freaks me out. Are these fears something that I would overcome during clinicals? Also, I am 45 and the thought of memorizing all those drugs is overwhelming. I have recently attended college and maintained a 4.0 up to now. Anybody out there who has found themselves in a similar position or who can offer wise advise?
    I completely understand your fears & anxiety about nursing school. In fact, I'm sure alot of people on this forum can relate.

    But as overwhelming as it all sounds, looks, and appears, it is a fact of life if you want to be in this profession. There's no cutting corners, no picking & choosing what areas of nursing you want to study(while a student), no picking what skills you want to learn & do in clinicals. As a student, you need to learn it all just like everyone else has & will. Besides, you might discover you're more comfortable after all.

    As far as the "weak stomach" goes, I also had a really bad one prior to nursing school & my job at the hospital. Just about everything(vomit, c-diff stool, sputum, wounds, etc) made my stomach churn. The worst part was dry heaving in front of a patient(as if they didn't feel bad enough already!). Since I couldn't avoid the situations and knew there'd be many more, I had to train myself not to focus on what was happening and instead view it as part of nursing and part of being human. Eventually my stomach adjusted & I became "tolerant" enough that I could walk into a patient's room, deal with whatever was going on, and not feel like I had to run right back out....at least 95% of the time anyways(I just had a dry-heaving spell yesterday at work over something).

    Now, do me a big favor and don't use the words "age" and "nursing" in the same sentence. As I used to tell people when they'd find out how old my husband is compared to me, age is just a number!! If you've got what it takes to get through nursing school and pass your Board exam....then why should it matter if you're 19, 32, 45, or even 70?? When I was in school, there were a couple students who were older(40s & 50s) and were doing better than some of those just-out-of-high-school(I think life experiences and having been through some plays a big part in why this is). Also, as an added tidbit, I am currently training a new LPN who is in his early 50s and have several other coworkers who are "newer" nurses and in their late 30's-40s. My point is, focus on what's important and forget about the rest.

    If it will help you out and/or ease some of your anxiety, why don't you check into shadowing a nurse for a day at a hospital or clinic?. If that isn't a possibility, see if there's a current student or instructor at your school that would be willing to listen to you express your concerns &/or answer any questions. In all honesty, though, I think you should consider getting a job as a CNA. Not only will it help your anxiety, it will also: 1)give you experience with caring for patients; 2)expose you to things that make your stomach "weak" in the hopes of making it stronger; 3)give you opportunities to observe how nurses function in the real world; and 4)benefit you in nursing school & at clinicals. And if that isn't an option, maybe consider volunteering at a hospital or getting a job as a Unit Clerk, receptionist, or something else that doesn't require direct patient care, but still gives you enough exposure to help you decide if nursing is what you truly want.

    Lastly, if this is the only thing you take away from my post, remember that you're not alone. Whether it be as a student or as a professional nurse, we've all been down this road or are currently going down it with you.

    Good luck!
    Last edit by swee2000 on Nov 12, '07
  8. by   ASSEDO
    I would not recommend nursing to anyone. Lots of people can be a nurse, but unless you are super-human, its not such a good profession.
  9. by   Shadrach
    I am sorry you have a negative opinion of the nursing profession. It sounds like you are feeling overwhelmed or overextended. Care to discuss further?
  10. by   Shadrach
    .....
    Last edit by Shadrach on Nov 12, '07 : Reason: duplicate post
  11. by   Shadrach
    .....
    Last edit by Shadrach on Nov 12, '07 : Reason: duplicate post
  12. by   snowfreeze
    Anxiety when entering nursing school is common. Recognizing this fear and working through it during your schooling and clinicals is what is expected.
    Your training in psychology shows your interest in what goes on in the human mind, I feel this will assist you greatly in teaching your patients in the future.
  13. by   Lorelai22RN
    Quote from Smithbc1
    I would not recommend nursing to anyone. Lots of people can be a nurse, but unless you are super-human, its not such a good profession.

    I agree partially with this. Nursing is tough. I would shadow a nurse, become a CNA to get a realistic view of it. No one is trying to be negative.........just take what everyone says and realize that there are good sides and bad sides........but both are very true. I will warn you, shadow a nurse, become a CNA, talk to other nurses before you commit yourself. Nursing has some pros but lots of cons. Just my two cents.You need to make a list of why you want to be a nurse and do some research. trust me on this one!!!
  14. by   Snuffy
    When I atteded nursing school/college I was a traditional student (fresh out of high school), but interestingly, the majority of my classmates were over the age of 40 and "second career nurses". I found that their life experience offered a different perspective on many things, and I learned a lot from them. The skillset can be acquired, and like anything else, practice makes perfect. :spin:

close