aide from hell - page 2

I've returned to nursing after an 8 year absence and don't know how to handle this one. I'm an LPN in a long term care facility and one of the aides on my wing is a real thorn in my (and... Read More

  1. by   Mysti
    Write this aide up and document your a.. off. Also tell her that if she does not follow direction she will be written up you can do this on a verbal warning sheet so you have proof.
  2. by   g.cook
    Yes you are liable for whatever this CNA does or not do according to a recent CEU course I just finished. If she/he is not qualified to do whatever task she is asked to do or does not perform it in the way it is expected, she is not to be doing that task.
    I finally quit nursing myself because I was being put into so many dangerous situations as an LPN in an long term facility that I was not trained nor qualified to do. It was either me quit or be possibily jailed for over extending myself. I was told by the DON to "wing it" after getting to work one night and I was the only nurse for 2 floors. She even wrote me up for insubordination! At another long term facility on a subacute floor I had another LPN literally take the phone out of my hand, say" cancel call" and hung up the phone. I was in the middle of trying to repage a doctor who had ordered Humalog insulin for a pt of mine and I was calling him back to let him know we didn't have any. He was the on-call doctor for her doc. Yes there was a sliding scale, but I found that in her chart! Whoever admitted this lady did not admit her as a diabetic. Nothing was written on her MAR indicating she was a diabetic. So she had not been receiving Accu checks, nothing for her diabetic condition. I only worked PRN, but that did not relieve me. I came in another day she was still getting the same 10 units of regular insulin if her accu check was above 350, which this was usually the case for her. So I called the doc again to get her on NPH. When I finally got through to the Physician's Asst. she said" oh yeah, he meant to do that on his lunch hour today, but forgot!" No one is perfect, but so many things are wrong in these long term facilies it stinks! Until its fixed I'm not going back either.
    Best of luck with your problem child.
    G.Cook


  3. by   Robin61970
    What if hse chose to become a nurse someday and got away with the types of things you are describing....god help us
  4. by   Jason-ACNP
    The simple is simple. She is GONE!! Assert some authority here!! It's not only appropiate in this situation, it is imperative!!!! If you can't fire her, then take it to the person that can fire her!!! She is GONE! Nursing is hard enough with excellent aides!! There certainly isn't room for incompetent, disprectful aides who don't give a damn. Develop a backbone! That doesn't mean that you would become a drill sergeant. There isn't even a fine line. No need to walk on egg shells. She is GONE!

    Originally posted by pooh:

    I've returned to nursing after an 8 year absence and don't know how to handle this one.

    I'm an LPN in a long term care facility and one of the aides on my wing is a real thorn in my (and everybody eles's side)with, I feel, the potential for disaster.

    She appears to be about 16 or 17 years old and it's her first NA job. She's defiant, uncooperative, will NOT take direction and interrupts instructions to explain precisely why she did what she should not have done, never admitting that she may be wrong, or just plain inexperienced.

    Case in point: An severly dysphasic woman with a gastric tube, unable to assist herself at all but apparently able to understand what's being said, done around her, was left by this aide wearing a pt gown, a bed sheet to her waist, that's all, with the window open (northern zone, 45 degrees, windy, wind blowing directly in the window) and even I noticed the room was darn chilly. The aide entered the room as I was covering the cold, uncomfortable resident and I took her aside to explain how vulnerable the elderly are, etc, and she flatly interrupted me, told me she wasn't gone long, that she didn't need to listen to me and could speak whenever she wanted. She's right, of course, but not in the position she's working...

    This is typical, but not the only incident that other nurses, aides, and I have had with her.

    I've tried to approach her from the position that this job is an on-going learning experience and I'm trying to give her information, not criticizms, but it's not working for me or anybody else.

    My concern is that if she is this insolent and rude to the staff, what's she like to the residents, considering that her job does required the muscles of an elephant and the patience of a saint? Of course, she's often alone with very fragile and vulberable people.

    My inclination, after having discussed her work with a couple of other nurses who've worked with her, is to go directly to the DON and have a frank discussion of my concerns.

    Of course, we're all overworked and understaffed as are ALL nurses but she's like having one more BIG problem person to look after and, to some degree, I am responsible for her actions.

    I don't want to come across as a drill sargeant, esp. since I'm trying to wade through all kinds of new and only vaguely familiar rules, meds and equipment myself but something has got to give and I just don't think she's got the maturity to deal with this very important job, and the compassion and responibility that go along with it.

    Anybody out there......and suggestions?
  5. by   TLynn
    Originally posted by pooh:

    I've returned to nursing after an 8 year absence and don't know how to handle this one.

    I'm an LPN in a long term care facility and one of the aides on my wing is a real thorn in my (and everybody eles's side)with, I feel, the potential for disaster.

    She appears to be about 16 or 17 years old and it's her first NA job. She's defiant, uncooperative, will NOT take direction and interrupts instructions to explain precisely why she did what she should not have done, never admitting that she may be wrong, or just plain inexperienced.

    Case in point: An severly dysphasic woman with a gastric tube, unable to assist herself at all but apparently able to understand what's being said, done around her, was left by this aide wearing a pt gown, a bed sheet to her waist, that's all, with the window open (northern zone, 45 degrees, windy, wind blowing directly in the window) and even I noticed the room was darn chilly. The aide entered the room as I was covering the cold, uncomfortable resident and I took her aside to explain how vulnerable the elderly are, etc, and she flatly interrupted me, told me she wasn't gone long, that she didn't need to listen to me and could speak whenever she wanted. She's right, of course, but not in the position she's working...

    This is typical, but not the only incident that other nurses, aides, and I have had with her.

    I've tried to approach her from the position that this job is an on-going learning experience and I'm trying to give her information, not criticizms, but it's not working for me or anybody else.

    My concern is that if she is this insolent and rude to the staff, what's she like to the residents, considering that her job does required the muscles of an elephant and the patience of a saint? Of course, she's often alone with very fragile and vulberable people.

    My inclination, after having discussed her work with a couple of other nurses who've worked with her, is to go directly to the DON and have a frank discussion of my concerns.

    Of course, we're all overworked and understaffed as are ALL nurses but she's like having one more BIG problem person to look after and, to some degree, I am responsible for her actions.

    I don't want to come across as a drill sargeant, esp. since I'm trying to wade through all kinds of new and only vaguely familiar rules, meds and equipment myself but something has got to give and I just don't think she's got the maturity to deal with this very important job, and the compassion and responibility that go along with it.

    Anybody out there......and suggestions?
    As far as I am concerned you did all you could do short of changing her diaper. She is a risk to the rep of all new NA's, to the staffs moral and most importantly the reason we are in the health care field the patients. In this case I would talk to other staff members and go together to the DON and explain your concerns about theis NA. Strenght is in numbers because a lot of times if you go alone your aide will be defended as new that is my best opion. E-mail and let me know what you choose. TLynnLPN@aol.com



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  6. by   Nickli
    I am also a cna- here in Virginia we have to take state boards also and we can lose our cna licenses just as you can. I have been a cna for 14 years and love to work with the patients. I also say you need to get rid of her. She is endangering all those she cares for. I have seen some real idiots at all levels and they do not belong with us.She has to be dealt with or she with seriously injure someone and all on board will feel it. Protect yourself and go to the DON-

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    Blessed Be

    [This message has been edited by Nickli (edited April 21, 2001).]
  7. by   night owl
    What this young lady did to this pt. is pt. abuse and nothing less and deserves to be written up. Anyone observing any kind of physical, verbal, or emotional abuse is just as guilty if they let it continue and does not report such incidents. If after speaking to her and she continues to be insolent and rude to the staff AND you've seen what she does to the pts. on more than one occasion, I would have written her up along time ago! She needs to go and fast.
  8. by   misskittyp
    I also have an aide from hell-unfortunately my DON refused to do anything about her even though I did have witnesses of the care she is giving residents & the insubordination she has done towards me. Apparently this aide realized that she had goofed up & went to the DON & told her that I had used a racial word describing her (I supposedly used the N word). I do have witnesses that will also state in my favor but right now I am just obtaining my own evidence of her attitude towards the DON, ADON & myself not counting the residents themselves. Don't know if the way I am doing it is legal or not but will continue to do this if for no other reason than to be able to type up what she says verbatim. Hope this works cause if they (admin) continues with this I will be seriously considering leaving LTC & probably nursing since the CNAs seem to be running the facilities here in TX. & here we were worried about the RNs eating their young-watch out for the CNAs!
  9. by   Nickli
    Originally posted by Nickli:
    I am also a cna- here in Virginia we have to take state boards also and we can lose our cna licenses just as you can. I have been a cna for 14 years and love to work with the patients. I also say you need to get rid of her. She is endangering all those she cares for. I have seen some real idiots at all levels and they do not belong with us.She has to be dealt with or she with seriously injure someone and all on board will feel it. Protect yourself and go to the DON-

    I know that here in VA- that a family member or anyone can cause an investigation of a CNA. All they have to do is call the Nurse's board. I don't know what ya'll have in texas- I do know that a cna must be liscensed there too. So there is somewhere you can have her reported above the DON even.Hope this helps


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    Blessed Be
  10. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by pooh:

    I've returned to nursing after an 8 year absence and don't know how to handle this one.

    I'm an LPN in a long term care facility and one of the aides on my wing is a real thorn in my (and everybody eles's side)with, I feel, the potential for disaster.

    She appears to be about 16 or 17 years old and it's her first NA job. She's defiant, uncooperative, will NOT take direction and interrupts instructions to explain precisely why she did what she should not have done, never admitting that she may be wrong, or just plain inexperienced.

    Case in point: An severly dysphasic woman with a gastric tube, unable to assist herself at all but apparently able to understand what's being said, done around her, was left by this aide wearing a pt gown, a bed sheet to her waist, that's all, with the window open (northern zone, 45 degrees, windy, wind blowing directly in the window) and even I noticed the room was darn chilly. The aide entered the room as I was covering the cold, uncomfortable resident and I took her aside to explain how vulnerable the elderly are, etc, and she flatly interrupted me, told me she wasn't gone long, that she didn't need to listen to me and could speak whenever she wanted. She's right, of course, but not in the position she's working...

    This is typical, but not the only incident that other nurses, aides, and I have had with her.

    I've tried to approach her from the position that this job is an on-going learning experience and I'm trying to give her information, not criticizms, but it's not working for me or anybody else.

    My concern is that if she is this insolent and rude to the staff, what's she like to the residents, considering that her job does required the muscles of an elephant and the patience of a saint? Of course, she's often alone with very fragile and vulberable people.

    My inclination, after having discussed her work with a couple of other nurses who've worked with her, is to go directly to the DON and have a frank discussion of my concerns.

    Of course, we're all overworked and understaffed as are ALL nurses but she's like having one more BIG problem person to look after and, to some degree, I am responsible for her actions.

    I don't want to come across as a drill sargeant, esp. since I'm trying to wade through all kinds of new and only vaguely familiar rules, meds and equipment myself but something has got to give and I just don't think she's got the maturity to deal with this very important job, and the compassion and responibility that go along with it.

    Anybody out there......and suggestions?
    Sheesh-I work with this cna,too!...Actually I did just go thru a similar circumstance-I documented well and took it straight to the DON.During our "counselling session" with the DON this young lady really dug her own grave-I did not have to do anything but sit back and watch.And try to keep a straight face-she had been out right insubordinant to me-had even said"you are all the time trying to tell me what I can and can't do"She actually had to be reminded that indeed-that is my job...She is still with us-over the yrs she has intimidated many nurses to the point that she has not been written up very many times-but those days are over because I am her charge nurse,not intimidated-and she knows it.I can see she is trying-this post is reminding me that I need to give her some positive re-inforcement now-...
    There may be hope for your situation...then again-some folks just have no business in this field....good luck


    [This message has been edited by ktwlpn (edited April 25, 2001).]
  11. by   Louie18
    Welcome back,
    WE NEED YOU!
    Upon your return they obviously neglected to tell you your profession is now like white water rafting, you jump in and have to jump out.
    Comparable to sitting on the back of a bucking bull, when the gate opens you ride.
    You have the right and obligation as charge to let administration know you REFUSE to have this spoiled (probably daughter of someone within your establishment) young lady burden you with the liability that YOU will be hung for.
    It's an entirely different game today and they (planned) to have nurses in termoil and so confused that they became robots.
    Louie
  12. by   CEN35
    I have had similar situations before pooh. Let me say, you need others that will back you up. You also need documentation of specific events, and need to talk to her the first couple of events (without any resolution or change in her behavior), preferably with three people (total) present. then you can go to the DOn, and go from there. Otherwise, it can just be considered harassment. So document, take ALL the steps, and then punt and boot if neccesary.

    Rick
  13. by   res04lly
    I would think that leaving a patient in a gown with the window open would be considered pt abuse????? sounds like a talk with the head of the nursing home is in order. In michigan the aides have to be 18 to work in a nursing home why is she working in your faulty-is it a vocational program threw the high school that she is coming threw or was she a direct hire??If it's threw the school all you have to do is call her instructor, if it's a direct hire, Run don't walk to the next higher up to talk with them about this because you are responsible for what happens on your shift especially if you are the charge person.Good Luck to You :]

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