Advice Please! A cna spread a rumor about me. - page 2

Greetings All, I've never started a thread, but this is a doozey, and wanted adivice. I am an older last year RN student. In my clinicals I slightly stuck myself while giving an insulin shot. I... Read More

  1. by   buddiage
    I don't think you should've worried about it.

    You aren't the only nurse who has accidently stuck themselves, it's not like your face is on the wall of shame or anything. I also would not have called her to tell her how lucky she was that I wasn't reporting her, etc.

    Do not raise heck- as has been said, we students are guests.

    I've seen just a small amount of people that I wouldn't want to work with (cranky nurses in an otherwise nice group) and I have a feeling that is just the way it is no matter where we are and what line of work for that matter.
  2. by   ginger58
    thanks so much for all the feedback. can anyone tell me...
    i thought "harrassment" means "the repeated taunting" of another person.
    about gossip - i thought the privacy agreement we all have to sign is as important as hippa.reply:
    i'm feeling like this whole incident is being blown out of proportion. hospitals can be very cattie places so when things happen they get talked about in some instances.
    i admire you for your direct approach because "talking to the person directly" is always stressed. this was a student to student issue. there are people that can own up to their gossiping and apologize and then there are those that blame the victim. as the victim i wouldn't be the one apologizing!
    this isn't a hippa violation. but you have to realize that there are just people like her that feel important denegrating others.
  3. by   RebeccaJeanRN
    Since your fellow student was acting in role of CNA in the capacity of the hospital, then really (and you seem to know this now) you should have spoken to her supervisor if you wanted to address it. But here is the problem: all you have is heresay (plus some common sense telling you that she HAD to be the source of rumors), so you really would only be 'reporting' an opinion that this person said something (unless someone else is willing to stick out her neck in support). I just think that you made too much of it. Are you going to call everyone who ever says anything bad about you? Most of us would be on the phone 24 X 7... :uhoh21: Anyway...if no greater risk than insulin was your exposure, then I'd count my blessings that I didn't have a bloodborne risk as well and consider this a valuable lesson. Just thinking...is it possible that the real problem is that you are mostly just embarrassed and ticked off to have had a witness, who happened to be a not-so-nice blabbermouth as well ? I agree that she is an annoying little (big?) twit for talking about you, and it always irks me that all this gossip stuff is a part of nursing school, but I say live & learn and laugh as much as you can. Sometimes the more you make of it, the worse YOU look...that's one of the ironies of life. But an ever-present sense of humor and constant attitude of professionalism & kindess will ensure that you survive all the annoying little twits out there!
    Last edit by RebeccaJeanRN on Oct 7, '06
  4. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from Diahni
    I suspect I should report her to keep it all above board.
    Diahni

    Just be careful. It may seem that now you are reporting her out of spite/revenge and not out of other things.:uhoh21:
  5. by   firstyearstudent
    I don't know if it was right or wrong for you to call this gal or what you should do. I just wanted to say I am really sorry you got stuck and that you had someone telling other people about it.
  6. by   Miss Chybil RN
    [color=#990099]we must learn to let go, to give up, to make room for the things we have prayed for and desired. [color=#990099]- charles fillmore
  7. by   sweetpea123
    Well, I gotta agree with you...the other student/CNA shouldn't have talked. It should have been your choice to share/not to share what happened. However, there are a lot of people out there who love drama and will use gossip to make themselves the center of attention. I don't believe in growing "thick skin" but I do believe you can learn to alter your own perception of these situations. Instead of burning up over her talking about your business, own up to the error and tell everyone who will listen what really happened and how you hope they can learn from your mistake. Hopefully, your labs will be normal and this needlestick will not be a HUGE deal in the grand scheme of things. I don't think you owe her an apology for calling her at home. She turned this into a school-related (not employment related) situation the minute SHE started talking about it AT SCHOOL. But, in order to put it behind you, why not just write a letter apologizing for contacting the student directly and not using the appropriate reporting chain for privacy violations? Word it so you're not apologizing to the student directly...you're just apologizing for not reporting her to your faculty.
    Good luck! And in regards to the needlestick, I'll tell you what a friend/mentor told me when I made my first (and only so far!!!) med error..."You know what the best thing about this is?...You'll never do it again!"
  8. by   firstyearstudent
    Quote from sweetpea123
    Well, I gotta agree with you...the other student/CNA shouldn't have talked. It should have been your choice to share/not to share what happened. However, there are a lot of people out there who love drama and will use gossip to make themselves the center of attention. I don't believe in growing "thick skin" but I do believe you can learn to alter your own perception of these situations. Instead of burning up over her talking about your business, own up to the error and tell everyone who will listen what really happened and how you hope they can learn from your mistake. Hopefully, your labs will be normal and this needlestick will not be a HUGE deal in the grand scheme of things. I don't think you owe her an apology for calling her at home. She turned this into a school-related (not employment related) situation the minute SHE started talking about it AT SCHOOL. But, in order to put it behind you, why not just write a letter apologizing for contacting the student directly and not using the appropriate reporting chain for privacy violations? Word it so you're not apologizing to the student directly...you're just apologizing for not reporting her to your faculty.
    Good luck! And in regards to the needlestick, I'll tell you what a friend/mentor told me when I made my first (and only so far!!!) med error..."You know what the best thing about this is?...You'll never do it again!"
    Great post!
  9. by   JBudd
    Quote from Diahni
    Hello All,
    Thanks so much for all the feedback. Can anyone tell me...
    1. Can you grow "thick skin"? The personal qualities required for a nurse are a real conundrum - nurses should be very sensitive to the needs of patients, and overlook some real nasty stuff thrown at us.
    2. I thought "harrassment" means "the repeated taunting" of another person.
    About gossip - I thought the privacy agreement we all have to sign is as important as HIPPA, though it is not a federal mandate.
    Some pals who are nurses at the hospital told me I oughta report her, but I chose to contact her directly. I just don't see how it is harassment.
    Diahni
    IMHO, the harrassment comes from you using a personal venue (student listing) to contact someone about a professional incident (she wasn't acting as a student at the time, but as a hospital employee). Same as if a patient's family were to call me at my house instead of going to my nurse manager. Yeah, she gossiped. It happens. The thick skin part is not that we do not remain sensitive to our patients, but that the picky little pushy tacky backbiting garbage that some people love to spread should not go home with us nor be allowed to upset our personal equilibrium.

    If you want the truth, I would probably have gone to her myself, except I'd've done it face to face: because anytime there been a personal issue at my work, the question tossed at us was always "did you try to work this out with the person first?". However, again, it is the two different venues that make this case different.

    Apologies don't hurt the person giving them, (unless done is such a way as to assume a lot of guilt that you do not have or deserve). Apologies are simply the social oil that keeps us rubbing along together without blowing up or grinding to a halt. Saying "I'm sorry you feel that way, I did not intend it in that manner" is simple, straightforward, assumes no guilt, but allows both parties to go on. Whether or not she apologises, is on her soul, not yours. :blushkiss
  10. by   rn undisclosed name
    I had always been told that before you need to follow the chain of command you need to start with the person involved. Then if you're not happy start using the chain of command. If I went to my manager over every little thing she'd say "well did you talk to that person already."

    While I wouldn't have called this person at home I may have talked to her if our paths crossed. If it was another CNA you wouldn't have had her phone number. It probably would have been better to just say something when you had seen her the next time. Sure she got defensive when you said that little comment about how you should report her. Who wouldn't? It's just human nature.

    Take this as a lesson learned in more ways than one. The best thing to do I believe at this point is to clear the air with her. A simple apology wouldn't hurt and saying you just want to clear the air with her etc. Also maybe she's really not a bad person and you can both find a way to get along. As hard as it is sometimes it's better to just be the bigger person.
  11. by   UM Review RN
    I think you should count your blessings. If I stuck myself in clinical, I'd have been kicked out of the program, no exceptions.

    It's nice to see that nursing school is getting a little more realistic about these things, but as with any incident, it should NOT be discussed, especially in such detail.

    And I do hope you filed an incident report with the hospital. MRSA and VRE are nothing to sneeze at and I am glad you reported it immediately and are being treated.

    As to whether you should have called this CNA/fellow student, I agree that no, you should not have. Neither should she--or anyone else--be discussing (or gossiping about) this matter and pointing fingers at you. It's a mistake. An embarrassing and potentially dangerous one to you, to be sure, but still a mistake that could've happened to anyone. I do hope you've learned how not to make the same mistake again.

    As for us nurses, we do discuss mistakes made by students, but only in general terms and only relating to patient care. As in, when getting Report, "Mrs. So&So was sent up to the Unit last night because one of the students gave her Dig with a heart rate of 40."

    I hope the situation resolves soon.
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Oct 8, '06
  12. by   morte
    not harrassment....that would req repitiveness....and in my personal, not paricuolarly prof opinion, the little twerp ought learn to keep her mouth shut.....and no, not every mistake becomes the talk of the floor, or hospital...we were taught that only those who had a prof/legal need to know were to be informed of any error..EVER......if nothin else she has violated prof ethics..and unless every word that she stated was true, she has lied and maligned you.... i would guess this not not new behavior for her, and she is used to getting her own way....the instructors need to rein her in, or can her
  13. by   augigi
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I think you should count your blessings. If I stuck myself in clinical, I'd have been kicked out of the program, no exceptions.
    Are you serious? Who penalizes students for accidents?

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