Adn's Who Don't Care - page 7

hello all, i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't... Read More

  1. by   JenNJFLCA
    I got my BSN because I know that I want to take my education further. I originally was going to get my ADN, but it only took me 1 semester longer to get my BSN, and I figured I should get at least a BSN before I decide to have kids. This leave me open to get my masters one class at a time once I have kids. ADN's are great, BSNs are great, Diploma nurses are great...we're all RN's!
  2. by   zenman
    Quote from Retired R.N.
    Zenman,

    Could you please give us more information about this medic training? Is this a clearly defined program with specific components divided between classroom and clinical experience, or is one just assigned to a medic's position with the assumption that on-the-job training will follow? If it is a fixed-length program, what tangible benefits are there for the students at various stages or after completing it? Promotions? Pay raises?
    This was the ARMY's medical corpsman program...not a current civilian program... and included classroom and clinical training on the units and in the field. Special Forces medics have a different focus since they can be more isolated. I went through in 1970 so the training might be different now.
  3. by   Alexsys
    I am an ADN and I am in a crossover BSN program now (:mortarboard: in April 2007). I did this because eventually I want to become a CRNA. Otherwise I would not have the desire to get my BSN either
  4. by   ibnathan
    Currently, I am enrolled in a ADN program and will hopefully be graduating this December. I do have a desire to go on and get my bachelor's but probably not in nursing. I am sick and tired of the bullsh!t nursing theory it is crap. So I will probably get a degree in chemistry or biology, and then look to get into either NP or Anethesia school.
  5. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from zenman
    This was the ARMY's medical corpsman program...not a current civilian program... and included classroom and clinical training on the units and in the field. Special Forces medics have a different focus since they can be more isolated. I went through in 1970 so the training might be different now.
    So, after completing this one year program and some experience, you were able to challenge the state board exam and obtain an R.N. license. Did this course include any pediatric or obstetric nursing, or did you learn these through independent study? Did the Army have unusually high prerequisites before you could be admitted to this intense course of instruction? My question now is that if the Army could teach you that much in such a short time, why can't more schools of nursing do something similar?
  6. by   Alexsys
    I was in the Army as a medic in the 90's. I still had to go through the whole ADN program (and take all of the pre req's too ). I did not get exempt from anything. I did get extra points towards the nursing program for my past experience though.
  7. by   Promin
    I think that eventually BSN will become a requirement for RNs. Also if want to get an international experience by practicing nursing in countries like Canada or Australia, BSN is a must because they don't recognize ADN from the U.S.
  8. by   kxvc
    I have no desire to get my BSN. I plan to get my Bachelor's Degree in Spanish after getting my ADN and pursue a career outside of nursing. The ADN is a wonderful option which gives me the opportunity to work in a field I love, make a decent amount of money, and be able to continue my education at my own pace without being bored with what I do or being broke all the time.
  9. by   abbaking
    Change the title of this thread - "Adn's Who Don't Care" - too degrading.
  10. by   husker_rn
    Unless you plan on advancement, an ADN will get you to the same place a BSN does. I have my BSN but don't get paid anymore than the ADNs do. I only got mine because I was ready to get back to school and was accepted right away in a BSN program.
  11. by   lupin
    I would like to go back for my BSN and then my MSN, but I have the idea that I want to teach nursing students. I was really impressed by one of my instructors in school who had been a single mom high school drop out and had worked her way from CNA all the way into her MSN. SHe was a tough lady and I really jived with that. She never let us slack and I thought, well, if she can do the whole gammit on her own with a kid, I have no business complaining when I have a supportive husband who wants me to succeed.
    Plus I'm 28 right now and physically able to do bedside nursing. But we all know older nurses who can't do the job physically anymore because of the wear and tear on your body. I want to be able to enjoy my "golden years" not sit in a chair because of debilitating back and joint pain. But I'll still work in some capacity of nursing even after I retire, you just can't get it out of our blood.
  12. by   jessiern
    When I started my ADN program, I attended to graduate and within a year start work on my BSN. But, in the meantime I meet a wonderful man--with a salary that more than doubles mine, and we got married. So, now our focus is on continuing his education. It just makes more sense to both of us to focus on his education, since he is the main breadwinner. Also, when we have kids I plan to quit working at least until they are in school. So, by the time I got a BSN, I'd be staying home with the kiddies. It just makes no logical since to obtain a degree I may never use.

    Just to add: he is very supportive of me and my career. My decision not pursue a higher degree is my decision. He would be more than happy for me to further my education if I wanted, even if I didn't use it.
    Last edit by jessiern on May 8, '08 : Reason: Just to add
  13. by   peggywi_RN
    I have been an ADN nurse for over 20 yrs...I love the bedside nursing..have no desire or the financial ability to get a BSN...I guess you have to sit back and look at your career goals...if you want more independence or management then a BSN should be in your educational goals...for me..retirement is my goal !!!!

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