"Funny Codes"? - page 6

One night we got a new admission into ICU from ER. It was a female patient being admitted with COPD in her 40's. She did not appear to be in distress and was able to talk with o2 on vital signs... Read More

  1. by   PeachyERNurse
    Quote from km5v6r
    I was working in CCU and it was our turn to have the code pager. We had just finished report when it went off for the PCU and I took off. Arrived in PCU to find both shifts still giving report asking "Where's the code?" They knew the call was for their unit but not which room had called the code and since all the staff were at the desk didn't know who called the code. We all arrived at the room to find the pt standing at the bedside screaming "I'm DEAD. You have to do something. See I'm DEAD. Help me!" The man in his 30's had been napping. When he woke to use the bathroom he pulled off a telemetry lead. When he looked at the bedside monitor he saw a flat line, knew from TV that meant he was dead so he called his own code. I backed out of the room trying very hard not to laugh while the pt became more irrate that we weren't doing anything about him being dead. Others were muttering "well if he really wants us to we could go ahead and treat him".

    OMG! I'm actually crying here!!!:roll
  2. by   rjtucker
    Having been in ER nursing since 1969, I've got some really funny ones, but I'll try to keep it short here. I floated to CCU one evening where a 54 year old male had been admitted with chest pain and EKG changes. He was beginning to throw a few PVCs a little too close to the Twave, however, he REALLY had to go to the bathroom. We tried to talk him into a bed pan and even tried it, but it upset him sooo much that I got an actual order to get him up on a commode. Well, of course you guessed it, he coded on the commode. Not only that, but his hips were a bit wide, so we couldn't lift him out of the commode to start the code. So, we had to do the next best thing. We tipped the commode back with him in it and you can picture what THAT looked like. Fortunately it wasn't filled with anything yet. The funniest part was watching the ER doc arrive and seeing his face as he realized that we were going to have to run a code with the on the floor with his legs up in a sitting position over the commode frame. What a site! The good news is, he lived to tell the story!
  3. by   rjtucker
    Well, maybe just one more good one. I was working in an ER in early 90s with a doc who was, well shall we say, free-minded....new-agish. Anyway, we had a full arrest come in and of course we all did our "thing" and were wroking away when we got him hooked up to find V-fib. This doc charges up the paddles, yells "all clear", zaps the guy, screams like a woman, flies back against the wall with a crash, and slides to the floor with his mouth open in the form of the letter "O". I guess this doc was so free thinking that he didn't wear underwear under his scrubs. "It" had inadvertently fallen against the side of the guerney and took 300 jeules right through....well, you know. It took us all several seconds to realize that we were still running a code and get the paddles away from the doc on the floor....my goodness. I can't believe we all kept from laughing ourselves right to the floor with him! I still laugh to myself to this day!
  4. by   SWAT_RN
    Several year ago while working in our ED, call came in from one of the local EMS. One of the audience at a very large, outdoor country music festival was in full arrest. OK, we got ready and were standing at the squad doors when they unloaded the pt. Watching the medics roll the pt. in, we decided they must be doing excellent CPR cause the guy's color was great. He was hustled into the trauma room, EMS doing CPR, and we began to assess the pt. Anyone arriving in that condition gets stripped immediately, so we relieved the gentleman of his only clothing item, his shorts...as two of us deftly yanked them off, ice flung forth from his uh...southern hemisphere and all over the trauma room floor. Since noone at this point was physically able to do CPR the doc checked the pt's. ABCs and lo and behold our full arrest pt. was mearly dead drunk. His pals found him passed out, emptied their cooler down his shorts and when that didn't revive him, they summond the EMS. The rest is history. The squad got a lesson in assessment once the doc regained his composure. We learned how to hold ice capades in the trauma room. Gotta love ETOH!
  5. by   mskitty
    This really needs a beverage alert! Laughing so hard my hubby was concerned that there was something wrong with me. These are all great.
    Kitty
    Quote from km5v6r
    I was working in CCU and it was our turn to have the code pager. We had just finished report when it went off for the PCU and I took off. Arrived in PCU to find both shifts still giving report asking "Where's the code?" They knew the call was for their unit but not which room had called the code and since all the staff were at the desk didn't know who called the code. We all arrived at the room to find the pt standing at the bedside screaming "I'm DEAD. You have to do something. See I'm DEAD. Help me!" The man in his 30's had been napping. When he woke to use the bathroom he pulled off a telemetry lead. When he looked at the bedside monitor he saw a flat line, knew from TV that meant he was dead so he called his own code. I backed out of the room trying very hard not to laugh while the pt became more irrate that we weren't doing anything about him being dead. Others were muttering "well if he really wants us to we could go ahead and treat him".
  6. by   NicoleRN07
    One of our older MDs worked the night shift with us one night, and about 630am, we got a call from EMS that they were bringing in a code. We prepared for their arrival, and were in the room waiting for them. Well, the patient was blue....very blue. As we are getting the patient off the stretcher onto the bed, our MD walks into the room, stands at the end of the bed, and says in a matter of fact kind of way...."Oh look, they captured a smurf." He walked out of the room, never saying another word. We all just kind of stood there for a moment looking at each other, and then we all just burst out laughing.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    years ago when i worked in ccu in a private hospital, some of the patients hired private duty nurses. the ccu nurses managed the meds, drips, monitors etc. while the private duty nurse were there for pampering and coddleing, pillowfluffing and the like. some of those private duty nurses were quite elderly, retired from the local hospitals and just picking up some extra cash to supplement their social security.

    when the call light went off, the ccu staff was sitting around the nurse's station eating dinner (back when that was still legal!) so we ignored it. after several minutes, the private duty nurse still hadn't turned it off. then the patient suddenly went flat line. i was charge so i jumped up and started down the hall toward the patient's room, and met none other but the patient, loping down the hall towards me and trailing his ecg leads.

    "someone's gotta look at my nurse," he gasped. "something's wrong with her."

    the private duty nurse was deader than a doornail, knitting needles still clutched firmly in her rigor mortised hand!
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    years ago, when working in ccu, the ccu nurses took turns carrying the code beeper for the house. my best friend's husband al (not his real name) was the medical resident on call, and i had the code beeper. at about 2330, a code was called on the rehab floor. al and i went charging off to the rehab floor carrying the lifepak. when we got there, the spectators gathered around showed us exactly where the code was.

    lying on the floor in the middle of the room was a little old man lying on his back, shorts around his ankes and his legs stiffly upright in the seated position. he was rigor mortised. "no one had seen him since dinner," the charge nurse said. "his roommate said he was in the bathroom, so the nurse knocked and when he didn't answer, she said she'd come back later. she forgot. and then it took us awhile to get the door open and figure out how to get him out of there without straightening him out." al said we needed to code him anyway, even though it looked pretty futile, so we started compressions while the rt started bagging him. the rt was from the rehab floor, so maybe he didn't know that there was supposed to be oxygen hooked up to the ambu bag. when we reminded him, it turned out that the oxygen tank was empty. we ended up stringing oxygen tubing from a flowmeter in the next room. the code card was unlocked and most of the contents were missing. we had the pharmacist bring up code drugs from the pharmacy, and al stuck in a central line since the patient had no iv. (not much blood return from a central line on a dead patient!)

    someone from the rehab floor pushed a gram of lidocaine -- not that it probably hurt anything by that point. and the nursing supervisor was standing in the back of the room flossing her teeth the whole time. flossing her teeth!

    when it was all over, the roommate made himself a dnr -- he said he didn't want to go through all that! who could blame him!

  9. by   patricelynne
    In my senior year in training we had 3 mos. of team leading and mine was on Osler 4, a public ward with primarily indigent, physically-challenged patients from Baltimore's ghetto. The first room on the ward held 4 and was called the Rose Room The sickest, most likely to crash were in there and on monitors, the old green Emerson ventillators, w/ chest tubes bubbling away, on O2, sneaking ciggs if at all possible. Found a jar of Kosher pickles between the thighs of one on NAS. Another time an intern discovered a bottle of Four Roses in bed with a man w/ a bronchopleural fistula joining his pancreas and his left lung. Had to really watch 'em! One eve shift a classmate and I were dealing w/ a 300+ sized granny---the kind who was on "CorticodigovitamycinTB"---and she coded while giving birth to major constipation results on a bedpan. The timid little lady opposite her saw all of us attempting to "save" the first lady and it scared her so much that she coded, too! Down the hall, an elderly man said to the nursing aide: "Something is wrong with my equipment." and stroked immediately following that. (Turns out he knew something about enginering and made a metaphor.) A new admit was delivered to the floor from ER on a stretcher and was waiting outside the Rose Room for transfer to a bed. He figured out what was going on and got off the stretcher, stating "I got de trombonepleabitis but I ain't stayin' here! They'll kill me here!!" Boy did he shoot out to the elevator fast! Never dull is it boys and girls?
  10. by   bethin
    This probably isn't too funny and I feel bad for laughing. Had a pt who was being discharged after a MI. He had walked to the br by himself (wife in room). I was on the other end of the hall when the wife comes out of the room screaming that she needed someone stat. I run into the room not knowing what to expect. I don't see the pt on the floor so I go to the br. Keep in mind these bathrooms make airplaine restrooms look huge. The poor guy had collapsed and had his hand stuck down the toilet in the drain. And it was stuck good! Couldn't do compressions as he was leaning against the wall and his right hand was across his chest and it was that hand that was in the toilet. And of course we couldn't shock him. We (or I guess I should say I) bagged him and called maintenance stat to try wedge the hand out. And who do you think they left in charge to bag and try to wedge his hand out? Little ole' me - the aide. There was only enough room for me and him in there so I'm attempting to bag in between pouring soap in the toilet. No gloves and I didn't care. More worried about saving the guy. I bagged him, pulled at his hand really hard because at this time I didn't care if I had to break his wrist to get it out. I and he screamed!!! Yikes! I jumped back and landed on my butt which was covered in the urine which didn't make it to the toilet. Meanwhile, my coworkers are standing there telling me "why don't you try this or why don't you try that?" Ugh. The guy did end up living and we never had to shock him. Guess me trying to pull his hand out of the toilet brought him back. And the wife? She was worried about the watch that was on his hand. The nurses? Well, they irritated me a tad. THEY should have been in there at least trying to attempt to get a line. There was no IV access as the guy was seconds from being wheeled out but had to pee one last time.

    And I had no extra scrubs with me but OB has extra scrubs. When I inquired about getting a pair of pants they said "well, we aren't supposed to loan out our scrubs." Okay, I'll just walk around with pee on my butt. They finally relented after I got snippy.
  11. by   liebling5
    [QUOTE=RebaT54;2083653] This doc charges up the paddles, yells "all clear", zaps the guy, screams like a woman, flies back against the wall with a crash, and slides to the floor with his mouth open in the form of the letter "O". I guess this doc was so free thinking that he didn't wear underwear under his scrubs. "It" had inadvertently fallen against the side of the guerney and took 300 jeules right through....well, you know.

    OMG I nearly PIMP!!:imbar
  12. by   123456yy
    On the first or second day post-op, we always get orders to put our open heart patients in the cardiac chair. We had just finished helping one of my fellow nurses put her patient in the chair, when the monitor started alarming. Sure enough, the pt was in V-Fib. Oh crap. We all run in and are pulling the patient off the cardiac chair, and onto the bed, when i hear a funny little popping sound above my head and to the right. The spike on pressure bag for the CVP line on the Swan had been pulled out as we transfered the patient over. The 1 liter bag of NS emptied out in less than five seconds in the same way a balloon flies around a room when it is let go. I looked up just in time to get a full face blast, and then watch as in slow motion, the bag sprayed each of my co-workers, and the patient. When it was all over, fits of hysterical laughter alternated with chest compressions. When the er dor arrived, not 30 seconds later, he just looked at all of us and the soaking patient, shook his head, and said "tell me later." The patient made it!
  13. by   tvccrn
    Quote from bethin
    This probably isn't too funny and I feel bad for laughing. Had a pt who was being discharged after a MI. He had walked to the br by himself (wife in room). I was on the other end of the hall when the wife comes out of the room screaming that she needed someone stat. I run into the room not knowing what to expect. I don't see the pt on the floor so I go to the br. Keep in mind these bathrooms make airplaine restrooms look huge. The poor guy had collapsed and had his hand stuck down the toilet in the drain. And it was stuck good! Couldn't do compressions as he was leaning against the wall and his right hand was across his chest and it was that hand that was in the toilet. And of course we couldn't shock him. We (or I guess I should say I) bagged him and called maintenance stat to try wedge the hand out. And who do you think they left in charge to bag and try to wedge his hand out? Little ole' me - the aide. There was only enough room for me and him in there so I'm attempting to bag in between pouring soap in the toilet. No gloves and I didn't care. More worried about saving the guy. I bagged him, pulled at his hand really hard because at this time I didn't care if I had to break his wrist to get it out. I and he screamed!!! Yikes! I jumped back and landed on my butt which was covered in the urine which didn't make it to the toilet. Meanwhile, my coworkers are standing there telling me "why don't you try this or why don't you try that?" Ugh. The guy did end up living and we never had to shock him. Guess me trying to pull his hand out of the toilet brought him back. And the wife? She was worried about the watch that was on his hand. The nurses? Well, they irritated me a tad. THEY should have been in there at least trying to attempt to get a line. There was no IV access as the guy was seconds from being wheeled out but had to pee one last time.
    And I had no extra scrubs with me but OB has extra scrubs. When I inquired about getting a pair of pants they said "well, we aren't supposed to loan out our scrubs." Okay, I'll just walk around with pee on my butt. They finally relented after I got snippy.

    It's situation like this (well, not quite like this, but you get the idea) that has made it our policy that NO ONES IV is taken out until they are on the way to the door. I know of a couple of our nurses that won't even take out the saline lock until they are AT the door and the car is idling at the curb.

    tvccrn

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