**nurses Who Eat Their Young Should Be Kicked To The Curb*** - page 8

We are in the realm of evidence based practice where nursing "traditions' have little value. This should translate over to the tradition of nurses who eat their young. We've all met them..usually... Read More

  1. by   got2labsrn
    Quote from JennieO
    To SuzieSunshine, how professional are you? Are you one of these new RNs who think thy know everything and do not? Why do these young nurses feel it is okay to go to work with tattoos, piercings and show us their crack and think they are professional. Suzie, I will tell you that where I work, most of us are 45+, we are in better shape than you and look a lot better and more professional than you. You see, we have the time and the $$. We do take care of ourselves and exercise a lot. Loans are paid off, kids are almost raised and we make more than you because we know more than you. Oh, and Susie, not all new RNs make it and yes, we do NOT think you are more important than anyone else, ourselves included. Grow up and be grateful all those "old" nurses are there to answer your questions, which we do answer even if we do not want to. Say thanks. P.S., I know many middle aged RNs who I would bet are better looking and in better shape than most of your age-based peers. Why don't you quit being so self-absorbed and try to learn from those more knowledgeable than you.
    The poster is not young, she stated she was middle age and what is with the horrific comments about...."we are in better shape than you, look alot better, more professional than you"...what is this all about??
  2. by   oldiebutgoodie
    I think that the issue here should not be who's right and who's wrong, who eats who, etc. The issue is obviously that there is a LOT of emotion here, and it seems to stem from newbies (not just young newbies) getting "hazed" by more experienced nurses, and the lack of solidarity and teamwork in general.

    As I had stated in a previous post, I was also on the receiving end of hazing and tattling, although now that I have experience, it has pretty much gone away. Is this any way to run a profession?

    As for those of you who want solutions, not whining, here they are:

    1. We must acknowlege it as a problem in our profession.
    2. There must be institution-wide policies and education on the issue, as well as no tolerance.
    3. There should be policies in place when nurses want to complain about another nurse--one of my friends works at a place where the complaining nurse must fill out a form and notified the "complainee" about a grievance. This has apparently eliminated a lot of the tattling.
    4. Obviously, if there are serious issues about patient safety, these should be addressed differently. But so much gossip and complaining seem to be about petty things (clothes, how somebody gives report, work left over for next shift, etc.)
    5. Managers need to nip this stuff in the bud, again, through education and not encouraging the gossipers and hazers.

    If you haven't already, read the "First Year In Nursing" thread. It is quite enlightening, and there are a lot of miserable new nurses out there. I think as a profession we can do much better.

    Oldiebutgoodie
  3. by   got2labsrn
    Quote from CASbeezgirlRN
    Why on earth can't people just stick up for themselves? Don't be a victim for goodnes sakes!
    It doesn't matter where you are in life, if you present yourself as confident and self-assured, you will not be bullied. If anyone tries, STAND UP for yourself. They will back down! Did anyone claiming to be eaten even look at the links posted by SmilingBluEyes?
    Educate yourself about bully behavior. 'Nuff said.
    I believe most of us are familiar with various topics regarding bully behavior. If not, there are numerous websites as other posters pointed out. There are also great books on adult bullying behavior as well. "The Bully at Work" by Gary Namie is a good one to check out at your library or to purchase.

    However, the bullying can/will continue sometimes regardless if you appear confident and & self assured. They may leave you alone, but will continue to pick on someone else. Why...because they CAN. Managers should be responsible for spotting and eliminating bully behavior, but as we know, often this is not the case and we have to go up our change of command and/or file a harassment claim in HR.

    I feel this bullying behavior often correlates with nurses treating one another so poorly & disrespectful; which is why we have this current lack of nurses willing to work in this profession anymore. It is a BIG problem and some of you will deny it, but it will continue to exist. There are many nurses who are truly unhappy due to poor working conditions, bad environment, short staffing, too many pt's, long hours, aching body/feet, poor pay, crappy benefits...which often is carried over due to the above & displayed with a poor disposition and treating some of their co-workers poorly...whether this co-worker is a new nurse, old nurse, doesn't matter...the person who is continuously unhappy & miserable will pick her prey to make he/she feel better. Look at all the openings in your papers, nursing magazines such as Advance and Spectrum....every week depending how your area/state is effected; there are numerous nursing jobs available, and 9 times out of 10, it is the same ads for the same facilities which continuously run each week or in the monthly nursing magazines. I look at the Sunday newspaper and nursing is pretty much devoted to 2-3 pages of openings! You look at other professions and well...the needs aren't as great.
  4. by   got2labsrn
    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    I think that the issue here should not be who's right and who's wrong, who eats who, etc. The issue is obviously that there is a LOT of emotion here, and it seems to stem from newbies (not just young newbies) getting "hazed" by more experienced nurses, and the lack of solidarity and teamwork in general.

    As I had stated in a previous post, I was also on the receiving end of hazing and tattling, although now that I have experience, it has pretty much gone away. Is this any way to run a profession?

    As for those of you who want solutions, not whining, here they are:

    1. We must acknowlege it as a problem in our profession.
    2. There must be institution-wide policies and education on the issue, as well as no tolerance.
    3. There should be policies in place when nurses want to complain about another nurse--one of my friends works at a place where the complaining nurse must fill out a form and notified the "complainee" about a grievance. This has apparently eliminated a lot of the tattling.
    4. Obviously, if there are serious issues about patient safety, these should be addressed differently. But so much gossip and complaining seem to be about petty things (clothes, how somebody gives report, work left over for next shift, etc.)
    5. Managers need to nip this stuff in the bud, again, through education and not encouraging the gossipers and hazers.

    If you haven't already, read the "First Year In Nursing" thread. It is quite enlightening, and there are a lot of miserable new nurses out there. I think as a profession we can do much better.

    Oldiebutgoodie
    good post.
  5. by   sandlewood_nurse
    WELL SAID !!

    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    I think that the issue here should not be who's right and who's wrong, who eats who, etc. The issue is obviously that there is a LOT of emotion here, and it seems to stem from newbies (not just young newbies) getting "hazed" by more experienced nurses, and the lack of solidarity and teamwork in general.

    As I had stated in a previous post, I was also on the receiving end of hazing and tattling, although now that I have experience, it has pretty much gone away. Is this any way to run a profession?

    As for those of you who want solutions, not whining, here they are:

    1. We must acknowlege it as a problem in our profession.
    2. There must be institution-wide policies and education on the issue, as well as no tolerance.
    3. There should be policies in place when nurses want to complain about another nurse--one of my friends works at a place where the complaining nurse must fill out a form and notified the "complainee" about a grievance. This has apparently eliminated a lot of the tattling.
    4. Obviously, if there are serious issues about patient safety, these should be addressed differently. But so much gossip and complaining seem to be about petty things (clothes, how somebody gives report, work left over for next shift, etc.)
    5. Managers need to nip this stuff in the bud, again, through education and not encouraging the gossipers and hazers.

    If you haven't already, read the "First Year In Nursing" thread. It is quite enlightening, and there are a lot of miserable new nurses out there. I think as a profession we can do much better.

    Oldiebutgoodie
  6. by   burn out
    Quote from suziesunshine
    My original thread was closed for whatever reason. I have been in the profession for over twenty years and I've met middle aged nurses or NP's who enjoys humiliating new nurses, orientees or students. Tell me, what other professional does this out of "tradition"?....answer...NONE.

    MBA's don't insult their interns or orientees. Engineers are not put through a "right of passage" by middle aged women with very little else in their lives but their jobs.

    In the land of evidence based practice, nursing research and emphasis on professionalism..this has to go. If you are a new grad, a new orientee or whatever and you are humiliated, being treated rudely or maligned, then go to administration. Don't take that nonsense.

    We will never be recognized as professinals unless this behavior stops.

    You say you have been in the profession for 20 years but how long have you been a nurse? Or are you just now starting as a new Rn getting flack from people your own age who have been a RN for 20 years? You may live in the land of evidence based practice , well why don't you show me some of that evidence that middle age sloven nurses with no significant other or life eat their young...where are your statistics where is your evidence, otherwise you just live in the same world of reality as the rest of us. It is really professional to accuse your peers without any facts to back you up..who is really eating who?
    Last edit by burn out on Mar 28, '07
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Mulan
    maybe by post #31?

    and what's with the finger wagging, do you do that to people when you talk with them in person too?
    Post 31 addressed/dismissed the flippiant phrase "nurses eat their young." Nowhere does it say that bullying, intimidation, attitudes, and unprofessional behavior do not exist.




    :trout:
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Post 31 addressed/dismissed the flippiant phrase "nurses eat their young." Nowhere does it say that bullying, intimidation, attitudes, and unprofessional behavior do not exist.




    :trout:

    I think that is what many of us are rejecting . . . that "NURSES" eat their young.

    That this is part of "nursing". I personally do not think that is true.

    It happens everywhere. On the preschool playground, at the high school, in college, in all lines of work.

    Even today I had to chuckle at a letter to "Annie's Mailbox" from a woman who just started a new job. She loves the job but hates the people she works with. She is the new girl and thinks she must give it time but "they are always so rude". She says "hi" with a smile and they never smile back and barely say hello. When she walks into a room they all ignore her. She comes home in tears. Guess what the answer to her letter is?

    "Dear Confused: Your co-workers may simply be accustomed to silence at work Pick one person who seems reasonably nice and ask them to join you for coffee or lunch. If they refuse, ask directly if YOU are doing anything inappropriate. The rest just takes time." . . .(smilies inserted by me).

    Amazing - she is being treated rudely and it is her fault.

    And she isn't a nurse.

    Who'd a thunk it?

    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Mar 28, '07 : Reason: typos
  9. by   Tweety
    I agree Steph and Marie. I dislike the phrase "nurses eat their young". Whenever someone is mistreated, or talked down by ONE nurse they scream "why do nurses eat their young????" When they are really only having a problem with one nurse, or perhaps even a gang of them.

    But I can say with 100% assurance and confidences, that as a group their are a few good nurses out of the couple of million out there and to label the whole profession based on the experiences of a few is lame.

    I also agree with some of the posters that part of the problem is that some people don't know how to ward off other peoples comments and behaviors. More than likely I haven't 100% received positive comments from my peers, but I don't cry when I get negative feedback, and I certainly don't allow myself to be mistreated, bullied or eaten.

    I also agree, there obviously must be a problem if the stereotype persists. There are nurses out there that eat their young. I'm sickened they cause other nurses to believe that nurses eat their young and accept it as part of the culture.

    I reject it.

    End of rant. LOL
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Tweety
    I agree Steph and Marie. I dislike the phrase "nurses eat their young". Whenever someone is mistreated, or talked down by ONE nurse they scream "why do nurses eat their young????" When they are really only having a problem with one nurse, or perhaps even a gang of them.

    But I can say with 100% assurance and confidences, that as a group their are a few good nurses out of the couple of million out there and to label the whole profession based on the experiences of a few is lame.

    I also agree with some of the posters that part of the problem is that some people don't know how to ward off other peoples comments and behaviors. More than likely I haven't 100% received positive comments from my peers, but I don't cry when I get negative feedback, and I certainly don't allow myself to be mistreated, bullied or eaten.

    I also agree, there obviously must be a problem if the stereotype persists. There are nurses out there that eat their young. I'm sickened they cause other nurses to believe that nurses eat their young and accept it as part of the culture.

    I reject it.

    End of rant. LOL
    Good rant . . .


    steph

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