Tampa nursing programs

  1. Hello,

    I am applying to the nursing programs in the tampa area, (hcc, spc and phcc) I was hoping someone can tell me what they have gotten in with GPA wise, or what they area aware of as far as the GPA cut off for the last couple entry peroids.

    Thanks,

    Allison
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   MLH821
    I can't tell you for sure about any of those schools, but have you thought about USF? I just got accepted there for the spring semester with a 3.7 GPA.
  4. by   APBT mom
    Last year HCC was turning students away that had a 3.6 and had wait listed people with a 3.8. They had 450 applicants and 50 spots. SPC and PHCC say that they'll accept anything above a 2.5 and completion of all the pre req's but I don't know how true this is. SPC has a campus specifically for the medical programs and offer almost all the classes online so I'm sure that they accept more than HCC. SPC and PHCC do some of the clinicals in Hillsborough county also.
  5. by   MB37
    USF looks at your entire cumulative GPA and nothing else, HCC looks at your prereq GPA. That can make a difference. I don't know about the others. You can get into USF's accelerated program with a 3.5 or possibly lower (but you also need a bachelor's degree).
  6. by   land64shark
    Quote from Tampagirl
    SPC and PHCC say that they'll accept anything above a 2.5 and completion of all the pre req's but I don't know how true this is.
    Not true anymore for SPC. They used to just do a waiting list by first come first served, but they have since gone to a "selective admissions" process. This is a combination of GPA and points for each completed co-requisite (in addition to the required pre-req's). I understand it's rather pointless to apply without having completed all of the co-req's. I'm not sure what the GPA cut off is, but if everyone applying has all of their co-req's completed, they will all have the same number of points for them and therefore admission will come down to GPA's.

    SPC has a very large program. There are supposedly 600 or so total nursing students between day, evening, LPN-RN transition, and various grant and earn-to-learn groups divided amongst the 4 levels.
    Last edit by land64shark on Oct 25, '07
  7. by   APBT mom
    Quote from land64shark
    Not true anymore for SPC. They used to just do a waiting list by first come first served, but they have since gone to a "selective admissions" process. This is a combination of GPA and points for each completed co-requisite (in addition to the required pre-req's). I understand it's rather pointless to apply without having completed all of the co-req's. I'm not sure what the GPA cut off is, but if everyone applying has all of their co-req's completed, they will all have the same number of points for them and therefore admission will come down to GPA's.

    SPC has a very large program. There are supposedly 600 or so total nursing students between day, evening, LPN-RN transition, and various grant and earn-to-learn groups divided amongst the 4 levels.

    I plan on applying there once I get finished with my LPN program and I also have all but four of the pre req's done that I will also do before applying. I just have to do the statistics, foreign language, comp class, and the micro for health sciences since they will not accept the micro I took for HCC's nursing program. That basically leaves me to do just the nursing classes once I get accepted. What would the co req's be?
  8. by   luv4nursing
    Quote from Tampagirl
    I plan on applying there once I get finished with my LPN program and I also have all but four of the pre req's done that I will also do before applying. I just have to do the statistics, foreign language, comp class, and the micro for health sciences since they will not accept the micro I took for HCC's nursing program. That basically leaves me to do just the nursing classes once I get accepted. What would the co req's be?
    You chose a great route to take and thats exactly what I did. It saved me time to just get my LPN and apply to the bridge program because there usually is no wait (I got into every program I applied to right away) and I could work as an LPN while I went to school. It was a win win situation. Good luck to u!
  9. by   APBT mom
    Quote from luv4nursing
    You chose a great route to take and thats exactly what I did. It saved me time to just get my LPN and apply to the bridge program because there usually is no wait (I got into every program I applied to right away) and I could work as an LPN while I went to school. It was a win win situation. Good luck to u!
    That's what I've heard when talking to all of the academic advisors at both programs. If you get your LPN you're basically in because they're is no wait and they never have enough applicants for the bridge programs to fill it. That's the same reason why I decided to go this route. Thanks.
  10. by   land64shark
    Quote from luv4nursing
    You chose a great route to take and thats exactly what I did. It saved me time to just get my LPN and apply to the bridge program because there usually is no wait (I got into every program I applied to right away) and I could work as an LPN while I went to school. It was a win win situation. Good luck to u!
    Yeah, but when I was starting my ADN program at SPC, they didn't seem to know when the next LPN-RN transition class would actually start because they didn't have enough applicants for a class.
  11. by   APBT mom
    Quote from land64shark
    Yeah, but when I was starting my ADN program at SPC, they didn't seem to know when the next LPN-RN transition class would actually start because they didn't have enough applicants for a class.

    Heard that too. Alot of us have been talking about it and I think once we graduate there's going to be about 20 of us jumping ship.

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