HCC vs. SPC vs. USF - advice needed

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    I have applied to those schools, and got into the Nursing program in all of them.

    Which one would you choose?
    USF seems to be the most attractive since I'll graduate with BSN, but scheduled graduation date is May 07..

    Your input is very much appreciated!
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  4. 0
    Quote from mystic_fish0526
    I have applied to those schools, and got into the Nursing program in all of them.

    Which one would you choose?
    USF seems to be the most attractive since I'll graduate with BSN, but scheduled graduation date is May 07..

    Your input is very much appreciated!
    Well congratulations! At least you have the opportunity to be choosy. I have heard some negative things about USF, the word is that their students are more book smart and not as hands on. So when they start working they have to be taught alot of the hands on stuff, and the nurses get aggrevated w/them. This may or may not be true, but it is what I've heard from several LPN's that work in TGH. HCC seems to be a good school, a little disorganized but they produce good nurses. Good luck, i'm sure you'll do great whichever you choose.
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    Go for the BSN I say. People are always saying that those programs (and not just at USF) aren't as clinically strong as ADNs, I've read and heard this so many times in the ol' ADN vs BSN arguement. BSNs are "book smart" and ADNs are better prepared.

    But it's really up to you. If you want to open the door for graduate studies then BSNs and safest route I think. Who knows how you might feel in a few years...? Satisfied about where you are or wanting to be a NP or something. If you have a ADN then you'd have to go back to school to get your BSN and that is 4-5 semesters (at least at my school.
    Go as high as you can go. There's nothing wrong with getting as much education as you can.
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    Thanks for your post, Christina. I do not really want to be a floor nurse for the rest of my life and plan to apply to grad school as soon as I'll get my RN license. Real problem with USF for me as their program takes so long. My husband is not very happy to support me for another 3 years of uncertainty. I emailed my advisor yesterday and she said, going by RN to BSN bridge I'll need just 18 more credits (and I hope, my future employer will reimburse me tuition).
    So I don't know. I'm very proud to be accepted into USF program as it is so hard to get there, but with SPC I'll graduate next December, which means I'll start working much earlier.
    I'm still thinking
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    All very excellent schools with good reps around here. I too recommend getting your BSN now. I got my ADN many years ago and it's taking me a long long time to get back into it. Even though we tell ourselves "I'll go straight into BSN school after I get my ADN", we rarely do. Work is so stressful and tiring that first year we don't do it, then we put it off. So if you have the opportunity to go to USF go for it!

    SPC now has a very good RN to BSN bridge. You go to school for the BSN but in the middle get an associates degree and can get your RN, then you keep on and get the BSN. So that's another way to go and might be cheaper if finances are a concern.

    Best of luck to you.
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    Hi 3rdShiftGuy!

    >>SPC now has a very good RN to BSN bridge. You go to school for the BSN but in the middle get an associates degree and can get your RN, then you keep on and get the BSN. So that's another way to go and might be cheaper if finances are a concern.

    I'm kind of confused now - I thought, in order to apply to RN to BSN bridge program you need to have your RN license first?? At least this is what USF requires.
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    I started my undergraduate studies at USF - Sarasota. Unfortuately, the program was distance learning for me as the main USF campus is located in Tampa. I found the USF program to be out of date and certainly out of touch with the "real" life of nursing today. In addition, USF had so many graduation requirements that I thought I would never graduate.

    I finished 3 semesters (part time) and then decided to enroll with the University of Phoenix to complete my BSN and my MSN. The distance learning program that USF offered was only open to RN's. Now, I have heard that USF has a great 4 year BSN program .... I am not aware of the program at SPC ... but Tweety seems to like it.

    Whatever decision you make, congratulations on wanting to become a nurse .... hurry up and graduate already .. we really need you on the floor.
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    Quote from mystic_fish0526
    Hi 3rdShiftGuy!

    >>SPC now has a very good RN to BSN bridge. You go to school for the BSN but in the middle get an associates degree and can get your RN, then you keep on and get the BSN. So that's another way to go and might be cheaper if finances are a concern.

    I'm kind of confused now - I thought, in order to apply to RN to BSN bridge program you need to have your RN license first?? At least this is what USF requires.

    Hi sorry to have taken so long. I think if you've graduated from their ADN program and go straight to the RN to BSN you do indeed have to pass NCLEX. I think they let you go ahead and start, but if you don't pass the first time you are out, or something like that. But there are allowances for people who want to move right on into the BSN part of the program.
  11. 0
    Quote from Christina_NICU
    Go for the BSN I say. People are always saying that those programs (and not just at USF) aren't as clinically strong as ADNs, I've read and heard this so many times in the ol' ADN vs BSN arguement. BSNs are "book smart" and ADNs are better prepared.

    But it's really up to you. If you want to open the door for graduate studies then BSNs and safest route I think. Who knows how you might feel in a few years...? Satisfied about where you are or wanting to be a NP or something. If you have a ADN then you'd have to go back to school to get your BSN and that is 4-5 semesters (at least at my school.
    Go as high as you can go. There's nothing wrong with getting as much education as you can.
    Hey Christina,

    I realize this post was back from 2004 but hopefully I will get responses on this post. I'm new to allnurses.com so I'm still figuring out how this works. I have a Bachelors degree in Advertising and just recently decided to go back to school in Spring 2013 to obtain a degree in Nursing. I'm trying to decide whether the Bachelors program at USF or the Associates program at SPC would be the better fit for me right now. It looks like USF has more pre req requirements before applying to their nursing program and once in the nursing program you take alot more classes than you would at SPC which is why you obtain a Bachelors degree in nursing versus an Associates degree in nursing if I were to attend the SPC Nursing program.

    I want to take as many pre reqs as possible so that I have more options available to me when I apply for the nursing program, either at USF, SPC or both. I'm working full time right now in an unrelated field but I'm looking for a job at the hospital just to get some experience in the nursing/medical field while I'm in school. I've been told that all the Nursing programs are extremely competitive so I want to get A's in all my classes. I realize this is going to be a challenge but I believe where there's a will theres a way.

    Do you have any suggestions? Which Nursing program do you think would be beneficial to someone who will be working full time while taking the pre reqs? USF or SPC? Thanks so much!


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