the bottlenecks of nursing - page 2

This is my rant. You may or may not agree with it, but I felt the need to express it among people who might understand where I am coming from. I graduated from nursing school in August. I had... Read More

  1. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from Cadavillac
    Oh no, sorry, I wasn't being sarcastic.

    Actually, I made my post not considering that not everyone had nurse aide/ward clerk experience like I did going into nursing school. I hadn't considered that some people graduate nursing school without ever having worked in a hospital before... if that's the case, perhaps working as a NA/WC wouldn't be such a bad idea if just for a few months. :spin:
    Glad to hear it....
  2. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from mvanz9999
    How does one pay debt for grad school on a aide's salary, though?
    I don't know the answer to that question. However, OP was unable to obtain an RN position right away in her area. Although, undergrad school is expensive enough... I don't think she went to grad school for her RN.

    So, I'm not sure I understand your question.
  3. by   RN 4 U
    I am sorry to say that i cannot relate to this dilemma. Where I live I had a job even before I graduated my program. They even held the job for me an extra 2 mo. This is unbelievable. I hope you find something soon. Have you considered moving if it is too hard to find work. When someone has student loans to pay off maybe its not such a bad idea to move. Many hospital even pay off your loans and pay for moving expenses. Maybe those out there having a problem could consider relocating.
  4. by   jjjoy
    Whether to take an NA/US job as new grad RN depends on several factors and on the individual. In the best case scenario, you know where you want to work, you get to know the staff at the hospital, they get to know you and you become a shoe-in the next time a new grad spot comes open. You might also start working as a NA/US somewhere and realize that you don't like the facility and you'll know you want to work somewhere else as an RN. There are also many reasons not to pursue such a position. It's just one possibility to consider in the circumstances.

    Also, be persistent in contacting HR as well as nurse managers directly, even if specific job openings aren't listed. Paperwork often gets stuck along the way, new jobs might be coming available that aren't listed yet, and (polite) persistence shows that you're serious about the job you're seeking and can help your application stand out among others.

    After hearing so much about the need for nurses it can be a bit of a shock to find your applications being ignored or turned down. If you're in an area where you don't get snapped right up, you may need to reorient a bit. There is a demand and you will get a position, though it might take longer initially than you'd expect. Try to keep in mind that this time next year, you'll probably have been working as a nurse for at least 6 months!
  5. by   EmerNurse
    Just remember, if you work as an aide, you are still held to the standards of an RN, NOT a nursing assistant. An assistant can lose her job for doing something wrong, or maybe even her certificate if she's certified, but an RN can lose her LICENSE.
  6. by   mom2michael
    There are 3 particular hospitals in the area where I live that post blind positions. They have no intention of filling them, they aren't even open positions. For 3 years now, the same freaking jobs have been posted on their website and in the newspaper. If you apply for these jobs, GN or an RN with 10 years of experience, you'll almost always get a response back...we are currently not accepting applications. So this obviously frustrates the employee seeking employment and they go elsewhere. Then the hospital calls you 3 months later and seems suprised that you no longer are interested in their position. Last week one even had a huge article in the paper screaming that they didn't have nurses and had to shut down their brand new units they just opened but yet if you tried to apply, it would take MONTHS to get a response from them even if you call and/or email HR every day. They also hire new grads, but only from certain schools and only during certain times of the year (Jan and July) so that doesn't help out their shortage either.

    Luckily for me, I got a job and start next week but I've also worked for this facility for some time now as a tech. Most of our GN positions though were filled with current employees graduating. I think HR said 1 GN position was filled from by someone who currently didn't work there.
  7. by   jjjoy
    I've seen hospitals in my area that post openings and yet never seem to be taking applications or take forever to act on them. Compare that to the places that I went to just inquire and the next thing I knew a hiring nurse manager was taking me on a tour of the facility and describing the position they needed filled.
  8. by   majestix
    Sorry - I've been away from my comp for a few days so unable to reply. I'm the OP by the way. I did find a job - not necessarily the one I thought I wanted, but a good position which may have long term potential - I'll have to see how I feel about it after a year or so. Someone wondered if my problems with finding a job might be due to lack of hospitals in my area. I live in Seattle - we have PLENTY of hospitals - my alma mater used eight major ones for clinicals that I know of (not even considering the smaller clinical sites like psych inpatient facilities and nursing homes). We also have a BUNCH of nursing schools. I can think of at least five off the top of my head within the city limits (University of Washington, Seattle University, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle Central Community College, North Seattle Community College - sorry to anyone I forgot), not to mention at least another half dozen within 10-15 minutes of Seattle. The combined websites for these hospitals had literally hundreds of jobs posted. But as someone mentioned, most of them only wanted to hire new grads twice a year. I never worked as a tech, so perhaps that may have had an impact on my hireability, but whenever I was informed that I was not being considered, the reason stated was consistently that they were not hiring new grads at that time.
  9. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from suemom2kay
    I don't know the answer to that question. However, OP was unable to obtain an RN position right away in her area. Although, undergrad school is expensive enough... I don't think she went to grad school for her RN.

    So, I'm not sure I understand your question.
    Reading it NOW, I don't think I understand it either. I think what happened is I was posting multiple threads at once, and got this one confused with the grad school threads I was posting in.

    :smackingf
  10. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from EmerNurse
    Just remember, if you work as an aide, you are still held to the standards of an RN, NOT a nursing assistant. An assistant can lose her job for doing something wrong, or maybe even her certificate if she's certified, but an RN can lose her LICENSE.

    So very important for people to understand! What a shame it would be to lose your license before you even worked as an RN. I had to float the other day and sit monitors, and let me tell you, I was calling the nurses non-stop about pts being off tele. Because if one thing happened while I, an RN, was sitting tele, then it would be my license on the line...

    Quote from majestix
    whenever I was informed that I was not being considered, the reason stated was consistently that they were not hiring new grads at that time.
    In my area (Az) the shortage is real, and like a PP said, I had my job almost 3 months before I graduated. However, we only had Critical care classes in July and January, so if I missed out on the class, I'd have to do med-surg until I could take the CC Class. I was not allowed to be on the unit without the class.

    Unfortunately, hospitals still think that most nurses graduate in May and December.
  11. by   KnarfKS
    This is the real world, employers don't have to throw themselves at you because you have an acronym after your name. It does suck that people can't find jobs immediately, but at least RN's will find a job eventually. It may not be exactly what you want, but oh well. There are plenty of people with bachelors and masters degrees who can't find jobs at all.

    Some places are in a nursing shortage, but employers must do what they have to to keep their organization going. By hiring new grads during certain periods probably keeps the costs of training way down. A one on one orientation would probably be very costly.

    When you work as an aide and have an RN you are held to the RN standards, but at the same time are only responsible for the job description of an aide. If you have to worry about losing your license as an aide, then you will probably lose your license when you work as an RN very quickly because of the added responsiblity. No offense to aides, I was one before becoming a nurse.

    If you have no job = no money. Aide job wages are less than RN job wages, but aide job wages are better then starvation and eviction from apartment. But if you think your too good to be an aide because you have an acronym, then you probably chose the wrong profession anyway. Nursing is very humbling in and of itself.


    Sorry about the rant, sometimes I just feel like I have to.
  12. by   ginger58
    We have had numerous new grads take non-RN jobs waiting for an opening. It was good for them. They got to see how the unit/floor works and we got to see how they worked.
  13. by   RNLisa
    Quote from jjjoy
    What a frustrating situation! Who wants to have to wait 6 months before starting to work? I'd be afraid of forgetting what I'd learned!

    Have you applied for any nurse asst positions? That's what many of my classmates had to do after graduation. If you can get your foot in the door at a hospital where you'd like to work as a nurse, already working there would likely increase your chances of being accepted into the new grad program when it finally becomes available. If that doesn't work, maybe you can still take advantage of this wait time to find out about the different facilities and different types of floors. Interviews, shadowing, volunteering... whatever can get you out there meeting people and finding out more. Maybe you can tutor nursing students as way to make a little money and keep your knowledge fresh. Try to make an opportunity out of this problem if you can. Good luck!
    From what I have been told, if you have your license, you legally cannot work as an aide with RN after your name. That is what we were told in Ohio.

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