New Grad Orientation next week

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    So I start orientation next monday for my first Nursing Job on a busy Medsurg Floor. Any advice or tips from experienced nurses out there ? How did you learn how to give report ? How to prevent looking nervous in front of your preceptor ?Geeez thanks in advance !!!!
  2. 4 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    Quote from IloveNursing2214
    So I start orientation next monday for my first Nursing Job on a busy Medsurg Floor. Any advice or tips from experienced nurses out there ? How did you learn how to give report ? How to prevent looking nervous in front of your preceptor ?Geeez thanks in advance !!!!
    You will be nervous and she's done this before you so she knows your nervous too. It's ok. Take a deep breath and remember that old saying the only dumb question is the one you didn't ask. They know you don't know allot. You can apply theory but this is reality and they are there to guide you and teach you. They should be there to stop you from drowning, but they need to know by you telling them sometimes that you are over your head. It you are feeling like you are overwhelmed, stop and take a breath and think of what's your priority at this moment.

    It's easy to take off running but stop yourself and think what else will I need to do this task or deliver this med or perform this procedure.

    As far as report, I found a good brain sheet for inspiration and then created my own. I found I kept forgetting to note time pts went off floor and came back and had to waste time finding information from other reports. I added that to my brain sheet. I organized mine by assessment head to toe. Top of it is allergies and diagnosis. I put the report I receive at change of shift on the form printed on our patients. ie BBS the other RN hears, I put what I assess on my brain sheet. Everything on their is my assessment. I can read off that in order at report and it's a very logical, complete COS report. My labs are listed on there, test/procedures done and what is ordered still for the pt in the future, it's my todo list too with a check off. I list my orders on there and check them off. That makes chart checks easier. That one brain sheet has fluids, vs, iv site, etc. That was one of the best things I did.

    Watch other nurses and see how they organize and manage to get everything done. They will all do things slightly different. Your preceptor's technique or style might not be yours. It's ok to ask other nurses what works for them. They have the experience I've found even the "most standoffish" are willing to impart knowledge if you ask and explain why you are asking.

    Remember everyone has been where you are. It's scary and overwhelming but it gets better.

    Good luck.
    IloveNursing2214 likes this.
  4. 1
    How exciting for you!

    My best advice? Take charge of your own orientation process. Make sure you clearly understand what is expected of you in terms of specific performance and behavioral outcomes as well as the criteria that will be used to evaluate your success. Keep a copy of all the 'checklists' and other documentation that will be used to validate your achievements.

    Be assertive -make sure that your preceptor 'signs off' whenever you complete a required task. Then, if you are working with a different preceptor you will be able to refer to the documentation rather than having to deal with unnecessary duplication of efforts simply because s/he is not aware of what you have already done. If possible, try to schedule some formal feedback time each week - to review your progress and set goals for the next week. This will prevent unpleasant surprises - ex: "you're nearly finished with orientation but you aren't making enough progress . . . "

    If you notice 'gaps' in your checklist - rather than waiting passively & hoping that the opportunities arise, work with your preceptor to make sure that you have opportunities to complete these tasks (admissions, discharges, patient teaching, etc).

    Remember that the only way to become better at time management (the biggest challenge for most new grads) is through experience - and you are not going to get that experience unless you are taking a full assignment. This is the single-most important outcome for new grad orientation. If you are unable to assume a full workload by the end of this period, your preceptor and manager may evaluate your progress as 'inadequate' no matter how much you have learned.

    Go Get 'Em!! You can do this.
    IloveNursing2214 likes this.
  5. 2
    Great advice! I start on the floor Monday as well
    I'm so excited!!
    TnRN43 and IloveNursing2214 like this.
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    Thank you !!!


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