R.N. Going To Massage Therapy School

  1. 1 R.N. Going To Massage Therapy School

    Hello, all...Happy New Year. I am an Experienced CA R.N. who will be beginning Massage Therapy school in a few weeks...anyone out there who has done the same, considering doing the same, or have any comments or suggestions for me? I am very much more interested in wellness vs illness, and want to get up each day loving what i do for a living and to be able to work for myself and control my income...I am interested in starting a mobile chair massage business, but will also do full body massages...ANYONE????? thanks...
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  3. Visit  smilingrn1} profile page

    About smilingrn1

    Joined Jun '11; Posts: 4; Likes: 2.

    15 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Esme12} profile page
    0
    Welcome Back!

    Post moved to own thread in Nurse message therapy for best response.
  5. Visit  RoyalNurse} profile page
    1
    So cool, good for you!! I'm a VA RN, graduated from massage therapy school last August, I now work at a Massage Envy in VA for experience, my plan is to become a subcontractor for the nursing homes in the area to provide massage for their residents. It was difficult to memorize all the muscles and their actions, and to get into the massage "vibe". It's a whole different world. . You can PM me if you have any questions, I have some cool neuromuscular therapy and myofascial release books as well.
    Last edit by RoyalNurse on Jan 18, '13 : Reason: Spelling
    littleornurse likes this.
  6. Visit  CulturedFool} profile page
    1
    I've been on the fence about this for quite some time. I've researched several schools in the area and it seems every time I'm about to pull the trigger some life event gets in the way. Things are good now and I've begun to consider it again but have a few concerns. First, and I hate to be this way, I am concerned about the pay. Then there is the time constraints of going to school and working with family obligations and all but I suppose that's more of an excuse than anything.
    littleornurse likes this.
  7. Visit  Nursejelly} profile page
    1
    I love it, I have been doing medical massage for 26 years and love it! I am entering my third semester of nursing school and also love it. I started with medical massage and continued my education over the years with ayurvedic massage, swedish, reflexology, and lypossage. I worked at a day spa for a couple of years so added warmstone massage and all the body treatments. So rewarding to help others and they always are happy to see you! I am now very excited to go into nursing and use my compassion to help people in another way. I say go for it, it's inspiring to do something new. It doesn't matter how old you are, I am 52 and I hope to work for many years to come!
    littleornurse likes this.
  8. Visit  luvnlfe,LMT} profile page
    1
    I am a clinical massage therapist attending nursing school for my BSN. I love massage and the therapeutic aspects of it.
    littleornurse likes this.
  9. Visit  chris2732} profile page
    0
    Smilingrn1, how is the massage program going for you? So far so good?


    Quote from smilingrn1
    ....I am an Experienced CA R.N. who will be beginning Massage Therapy school in a few weeks...anyone out there who has done the same, considering doing the same, or have any comments or suggestions for me? I am very much more interested in wellness vs illness, and want to get up each day loving what i do for a living and to be able to work for myself and control my income...I am interested in starting a mobile chair massage business, but will also do full body massages...ANYONE?????
  10. Visit  TBlase} profile page
    3
    Hmm. Strangest post yet to be seen on AN. For starters, the state of CA is the only state that does not require a certification to be a 'massage therapist'. It's voluntary to obtain that certification. Also, for an RN to go to school to be a 'massage therapist' is rather like a physician going back to school to be an 'intern'. It makes no sense. Aside from that, I know a few people that work at spas, and places like Massage Envy- they make little more than minimum wage, unless they are tipped WELL. For example- if a client pays $49 a month to M.E., they then might pay $29 for a massage- and the 'masseur' gets about $13, plus tips. That's for an hour of hard work. Are you going to go to a massage school for $15,000 so you can reduce your pay to that? Aside from the above, in many states a nurse can provide massage as it is, within the confines of the nurse practice act, without going to massage school. I hope this information will make a few people research what is reality, before they dive down the rabbit hole.
    MBARNBSN, dishes, and Marisette like this.
  11. Visit  TBlase} profile page
    1
    Another interesting fact- in California, you can take the bar exam without having a law degree, and even without graduating from college- maybe you can look into that process? There are several hurdles and pre-exams required, but many of the educational requirements can be 'tested out' of.
    littleornurse likes this.
  12. Visit  shmorgan3} profile page
    2
    Wow. As a massage therapist in CA for the last 12 years I'm not sure where you are getting your info from. California requires all massage therapists to be certified through the California Massage Therapy council. To qualify for certification you need a minimum of 250 hours of training from an approved school. I've never worked anywhere where they overlooked this law. Additionally therapeutic massage is not within a nurses scope of practice, nursing school is very clear on the difference between massaging a patients sore spot and providing therapeutic massage. Also, as a massage therapist I have never made less than $50 an hour, I usually make at least $70. I encourage anyone to supplement their nursing education with massage therapy training. As I complete my last year in a BSN program I am constantly seeing the benefit of my previous and ongoing training in massage.
    Mdavi and littleornurse like this.
  13. Visit  MendedHeart} profile page
    1
    This is not completely true. In a RN position, a nurse CAN practice therapeutic massage, we were taught effleurage, and other swedish and deep techniques, however a RN cannot go outside a healthcare setting and offer "therapeutic massage" as an unlicensed individual.
    Its is definitely within our scope of practice. Why wouldnt be, we do many invasive(this is non invasive) and skilled things
    littleornurse likes this.
  14. Visit  ThePhilster} profile page
    1
    I'm a massage therapist and in my junior year for BSN. If you want the best massage techniques for injuries and pain management, the best types are: Tui na chinese massage, Trigger point therapy, myofascial release, craniosacral, and chiropractic techniques.

    I've been taught by the best in the business for therapeutic massage. My teacher has 30+ years of experience.

    Since I'm still in school I don't know how much of this stuff I'll be able to use as a nurse. (Probably at least some, but for legal reasons, I'll probably be restricted.)
    littleornurse likes this.
  15. Visit  TraumaSurfer} profile page
    1
    Quote from shmorgan3
    Wow. As a massage therapist in CA for the last 12 years I'm not sure where you are getting your info from. California requires all massage therapists to be certified through the California Massage Therapy council. To qualify for certification you need a minimum of 250 hours of training from an approved school. I've never worked anywhere where they overlooked this law. Additionally therapeutic massage is not within a nurses scope of practice, nursing school is very clear on the difference between massaging a patients sore spot and providing therapeutic massage. Also, as a massage therapist I have never made less than $50 an hour, I usually make at least $70. I encourage anyone to supplement their nursing education with massage therapy training. As I complete my last year in a BSN program I am constantly seeing the benefit of my previous and ongoing training in massage.
    Totally not true. Certification is voluntary. There is not even a basic knowledge test required.
    Lax Enforcement of Massage Industry Allows Illicit Spas to Proliferate - Police & Fire - Petaluma, CA Patch

    Probably next to EMS in California, Massage Therapy is the next most dysfunctional "profession". Buyer be aware and very, very careful in this state. Never ever buy a gift certificate for a massage to give to someone you care about unless you have done some extensive research on the person calling themselves a massage therapist.

    quote
    “There is no requirement for certification in California unless you are in a city or county that requires a business to be certified, and most do not,” said Ahmos Netanel, chief executive officer of the California Massage Therapy Council (CAMTC), created in 2009 as a result of legislation aimed at regulating the industry and which offers certification for massage therapists who seek it out on their own.

    Quote from 2013SNGrad
    This is not completely true. In a RN position, a nurse CAN practice therapeutic massage, we were taught effleurage, and other swedish and deep techniques, however a RN cannot go outside a healthcare setting and offer "therapeutic massage" as an unlicensed individual.
    Its is definitely within our scope of practice. Why wouldnt be, we do many invasive(this is non invasive) and skilled things
    Some Paramedics can also do most and even more than an RN but that does not make them an RN or allow them to practice as one. But unfortunately in California which is basically still an unregulated state for Massage Therapists, anyone can call them a Massage Therapist which is why this state still has "Massage Parlors".

    I have yet to see a nurse do effeurage or any of the deep tissue techniques massage therapists can do or even spend enough time with each patient to do this. In states like NY and FL they want you to spend at least 150 hours actually doing massage to get the license. I don't know any nursing school which has just 150 hours of clinicals dedicated to giving a patient a full body massage. We were basically taught a few prinicples for "massaging the skin" for circulation and applying lotion. Just like some other things in nursing school we only got an overview. EKGs, respiratory therapy and emergency procedures are also examples. For massage this is the loop hole which allows just about anyone to call themselves a massage therapist or to practice massage therapy without any specifically regulated education or training or even testing. Some massage schools might allow RNs to challenge out of the A&P part but I don't know many RNs who can name all the muscles and their origins and insertion points the way many truly professional Massage Therapists can.

    Soapbox? Yeah. It is a ***** to send someone a gift certificate for a massage and have them end up in pain from some idiot with a weekend massage school "certification". Lesson learned in a bad way.
    Mdavi likes this.


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