Thinking of transferring to the ER

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    A friend of mine I worked with for a while transferred to our hospital's ER and is saying that he can get me in too if I respond to her within the week. I'm a little afraid to be honest because our ER's turnover rate is high (though I hear it's because people get their experience and move on to greener pastures). I've worked on telemetry for almost two years so I feel like the ER is a whole new beast which makes me apprehensive. It's a small community hospital with a sizable indigent population so we are something short of a drunk tank and local psych facility. Would my skills transfer over to the ER? Is it true that domineering nurses thrive while the easy going ones tend to do poorly?
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    Each facility is different. In my community hospital ER, the nurses that tend to thrive are those that value teamwork and work well together. I think another trait that seems to be consistent is the nurse that thrives on learning new things and growing seems to enjoy the excitement and learning experience of the ER, where the nurse who want to punch a clock and do the same thing, different day tends to find somewhere else.

    Of course vast generalizations like I'm making are just that.
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    Why do you want to go to the ER? Is it just because your coworker transferred?

    Are you happy on your tele floor?

    I'm just asking because you sound very apprehensive right off the bat. I love the ER but it's not for everyone. Ever since I knew I wanted to be a nurse, the ER is the only place I wanted to be. I consider myself easy going and I think I do well; we have all different personalities in the ER. Some shared traits are probably: Ability to work with the team as well as independently, adaptability to constantly changing scenarios, prioritization, speed/efficiency, a thick skin, rapid assessment skills & focused assessments, and finally a good sense of humor
    Emergent likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from 1fastRN
    Why do you want to go to the ER? Is it just because your coworker transferred? Are you happy on your tele floor? I'm just asking because you sound very apprehensive right off the bat. I love the ER but it's not for everyone. Ever since I knew I wanted to be a nurse, the ER is the only place I wanted to be. I consider myself easy going and I think I do well; we have all different personalities in the ER. Some shared traits are probably: Ability to work with the team as well as independently, adaptability to constantly changing scenarios, prioritization, speed/efficiency, a thick skin, rapid assessment skills & focused assessments, and finally a good sense of humor
    My issue is the hospital has been going under massive cutbacks. My position on the tele is being eliminated since the floor is closing in August and I Have no seniority to stay. It's either I take this ER position or I hit the bricks. My other option is to go back to the SNF I work at per diem and take a full time position again. But I do want to advance my career and this is my chance however I am really apprehensive about it because I feel like my SNF/Floor skills do not translate to the ER.
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    Quote from Catch22Personified
    My issue is the hospital has been going under massive cutbacks. My position on the tele is being eliminated since the floor is closing in August and I Have no seniority to stay. It's either I take this ER position or I hit the bricks. My other option is to go back to the SNF I work at per diem and take a full time position again. But I do want to advance my career and this is my chance however I am really apprehensive about it because I feel like my SNF/Floor skills do not translate to the ER.
    Given that side of the story I would talk to your friend and see if he really can pull strings to get you a job
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    Flexibility is the key to working ER. Domineering is optional. How about assertive?
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  9. 0
    Quote from nurse2033
    Flexibility is the key to working ER. Domineering is optional. How about assertive?
    LOVE. THIS. POST.
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    I asked the ER director if I could observe/help out a day yesterday and I followed one of the more experienced RNs. I was completely overwhelmed. I'm trying to do an initial assessment, do blood work, and get an EKG; then as soon as I get out I find out there are three more patients already in beds waiting to be triaged! The hospital is trying some new experimental method of triaging people when the actual ER isn't full and take people in the waiting room immediately bypassing the triage RN. I'm sorta assertive but the ER is full of extremely strong personalities than my little old self. I feel like I know nothing again.
  11. 0
    Quote from Catch22Personified
    I asked the ER director if I could observe/help out a day yesterday and I followed one of the more experienced RNs. I was completely overwhelmed. I'm trying to do an initial assessment, do blood work, and get an EKG; then as soon as I get out I find out there are three more patients already in beds waiting to be triaged! The hospital is trying some new experimental method of triaging people when the actual ER isn't full and take people in the waiting room immediately bypassing the triage RN. I'm sorta assertive but the ER is full of extremely strong personalities than my little old self. I feel like I know nothing again.
    Well a tele floor is nothing like ER, so the learning curve is steep. It sounds like they through a lot at you for a shadowing experience. In the ER you will get excellent at time management. I will say in my ER you would never be given three new pts all at once
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    Quote from Catch22Personified
    I asked the ER director if I could observe/help out a day yesterday and I followed one of the more experienced RNs. I was completely overwhelmed. I'm trying to do an initial assessment, do blood work, and get an EKG; then as soon as I get out I find out there are three more patients already in beds waiting to be triaged! The hospital is trying some new experimental method of triaging people when the actual ER isn't full and take people in the waiting room immediately bypassing the triage RN. I'm sorta assertive but the ER is full of extremely strong personalities than my little old self. I feel like I know nothing again.
    Sounds like that nurse didn't do a good job of starting you out and building you up. Some nurses seem to think it's cool to watch someone flounder, or that you have to sink before you swim. I'm not a fan of that process, but yes, ER nursing is different enough that you will feel totally overwhelmed, and be totally overwhelmed at times. Part of ER nursing is figuring out how to manage your time in a totally interrupt driven environment where nothing is scheduled, everything is a stat now order. That can only come with experience, but it does come, and that nurse that was watching you sink, was overwhelmed when she started too!
    As for the strong personalities, those come with time and growth. When my wife started in the ER, she was timid as could be, now she is one of those strong personalities that makes herself known. When a doc orders something she disagrees with, if she has to she will go toe to toe with 'em, no problem. They may yell, or pout (I love it when docs pout), but they will listen to her and finally come around and deal with it. That part of you will grow in the ER.
    The good thing about feeling like you know nothing, is it gives you a chance to re-learn it. Some things will be different, others will be the same. Some you have forgotten because you didn't have to use them, others, are totally new. It will not be a situation where you walk in and your up to speed that day, it will take some time. If the ER is willing to train you and get you up to speed, it can be a great place to work, fun and different every day. A bit scary on occasion, but still very rewarding.
    SherluckyRN likes this.


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