lpn's in ER

  1. I have been an Lpn for 17 years. I used to work in the Er in Western NY untill I moved by New York City. I was the first LPN in the ER back home and helped to write what they could and couldn't do. At first the RN really gave me a hard time untill they learned my skills and what i was like by the time i left the ones that gave me the hardest time actually would rather work with me than some of the newer Rn.........anyway I must of showed them that LPN could work in the ER cuz after I left they created 4 positions for LPN's instead of my one. I would just like some feedback on how all of you feel regarding LPN'S in the ER. I am going to be going to move to the Greenville are in S.C. and was wondering if anyone from that area knows if they have LPN's in the ER's or if not any ideas on how to approach the hospitals about trying LPN's in the ER as I really love ER and miss it.
    countryair
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  2. 46 Comments

  3. by   Uptoherern
    i have no problem with an EXPERIENCED LPN in the ER...afterall, LPN's in my facility can start IV's and give all meds, except pushes. What difference does it make? We always have 2 RN's no matter what, so with the 3rd nurse being an LPN would be fine with me. We are a 10 bed, level 2 trauma ed.
  4. by   LilgirlRN
    We used to have LPN's working every shift in our ER, now we only have one and when she leaves her position will be filled with an RN. I have no qualms about working with an experienced LPN such as yourself. Used to be just me and an LPN for the night shift, I had to depend on her for a lot of things if it got busy. She was a good nurse and eventually went on to get her RN. Unfortanately, I don't have any information for you about LPN positions in the ER other places. Good luck in finding a position that you enjoy.
  5. by   sgavette
    I think that LPN's should be allowed in the ER as long as they are experienced. On weekends during the day where I work, there is a LPN on. She does meds (except pushes), vitals, treatments, IV's, etc. I feel that you are better off to have an LPN then a tech.
  6. by   4XNURSE
    countryair41,

    Why not? LPNs/LVNs have at least as much training as any EMTs. We have EMTs working in ERs all the time out here. I've worked with several LVNs that were better nurses than some of the RNs. We all come in to work. You do the job to the best of your practice, and shouldn't have to apologize for anything.
  7. by   CEN35
    no idea? our er is all rn's

    me
  8. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heart of texas
    The Er Im working in is all RN with the exception of a handfull of techs, to do tech stuff. I know the administration here will never allow lpn/lvns in the Er anymore. Has nothing to do with bad experiences or anything. Just that the way they interpret the laws of texas. or whatever, they feel you need to only have Rn s in the Er.
    Keep it in the short grass yall
    teeituptom
  9. by   traumaRUs
    I was an LPN for two years while completing an RN program. In Illinois, at least in the level I where I work, we don't have LPNs anymore - they phased them out about five years ago. It just got to be very tedious to have to sign off on the assessments and do all the IV meds. However, we still have LPNs in the urgent care facilities.
  10. by   fab4fan
    Not a great idea, in my opinion...too much falls back on the RN. Also, a lack of skill (e.g. pt needed a push cardiac med, LPN drew it up, came up to me and said, "My pt needs some push cardizem, here, I got it ready for you." She couldn't understand why I didn't want to give it.

    Lack of understanding ekg's, interventions, etc. And as a result, all the easy pts go to the LPN's and the difficult pts to the RN...ya know, once in a while a sprain or migraine would be nice.
  11. by   LerRN95
    I have two LPN that work in our ER. They work from 11a-11p when it is the busiest. They are experienced nurses and I perfer them over calling some RN's from the floor for help in most situations. They do not all lack understanding of EKG's ect. These LPN's are required to take and pass ACLS and PALS, just like the rest of us.

    They are a GREAT help, when you are the ONLY RN in the ED. JMPO
  12. by   Momfergie
    Originally posted by fab4fan
    Not a great idea, in my opinion...too much falls back on the RN. Also, a lack of skill (e.g. pt needed a push cardiac med, LPN drew it up, came up to me and said, "My pt needs some push cardizem, here, I got it ready for you." She couldn't understand why I didn't want to give it.

    Lack of understanding ekg's, interventions, etc. And as a result, all the easy pts go to the LPN's and the difficult pts to the RN...ya know, once in a while a sprain or migraine would be nice.
    Wow, that's harsh.... I'm an LPN with over 15 years experience and I work in the ER. I'm required to be ACLS and PALS certified, can read ekg's just fine, can start lines and am often given 'difficult patients'. I feel I'm very skilled and am very much a contributing member in my department. As with all professions, there are good and bad.
  13. by   Nittlebug
    Wait a second. Now, I agree that having experienced personel in the ER is important, but the last I heard, LPNs still cannot give IV push meds, correct? Or is this different state to state? A huge number of ER patients get IV push meds and need RN assessments, so why should I (as an RN) have to do those tasks for an LPN when I already have a pt load? That's not fair, and I would speak out against hiring an LPN in our dept. based on just that.
  14. by   KKERRN
    We have several LPN's in our ER, but they are limited to the zones they can work. They can work our express zone and minor medical zones. We need to give certain meds and take care of the pediatric pts IV and meds.
    We have one very experience LPN that also can do triage and monitor rooms when necessary, but she is the exception.
    We also have several EMT's that can do those same zones, but no meds or discharges!!
    These are all very helpful when there is enough RN's, but when we are short it becomes hard to do your zone plus their needs too! This usually happens on the busiest nights! For this reason I feel it would be best to have all RN's to assign to zones and use LPN or EMT for float purposes only.

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