1. I am currently finishing up my year in the cardiac ICU. I will be moving form my current job to a new area and I think I would really like to give ER a whirl. I have 16 months med/surg, 1 year peds, 1 year icu.....what would be the hardest part in crossing over, and should it be fairly doable?
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   ImMrBill3, RN
    Good luck!
    I am hoping to do about the same. I am probably starting in ICU. I don't know beans factually to answer your question but I think you have plenty of good experience and will do great!:spin:
  4. by   Dalzac
    Depends on the level of the ER if they take level4 it is an easy crossover but if it is 2 or above it is going to be fast and You have to make snap judgements. Some times you can have anywhere from 3-6 patients. Where I worked if you had one go bad the other folks I worked with were good about taking over your patients. I loved working in ER but I also loved Icu.
  5. by   bill4745
    I made the ICU to ER switch 3 years ago. Your ICU and peds experience is a big plus. The hard part is dealing with critical patients - you often don't have the time to pay attention to details that you have in the unit.
    I love the ER-there is never a dull moment, and every shift I still learn something new.
  6. by   dlane
    just curious, what do you think is the hardest part to learn in ER? I feel fairly comfortable in managing cardiac drips, i do well on EKG interpretation, and have gone to a lot of codes, but never ran one as our ICU CRN does that but i have a good understanding with that I think. Do you guys titrate drips on your own or have to have a Dr. orders? Will have to brush up on my peds vitals but sure that will come back quickly, but I also have never started an IV on a baby O.o.

    I am a little worried about trauma as i have not had to deal with that. I am not usually squeemish and can eat while people vomit and GI bleeds don't bother me, but having bones sticking out of people while they are screaming is a whole nother story, but i guess you just focus on the task at hand and don't think about it too much.