How many APNs in school for DNP???

  1. [font="comic sans ms"]i am going back to the hospital where i worked for 10 years. their affiliated college of nursing is starting a dnp program in the fall of 2008 and are desperately looking for students - lol. now, the hospital will pay for my dnp. am unsure now whether it would mean a pay increase or not but want to find that out before i commit to that course of study. has anyone else gone the dnp route? i have an msn in management and leadership and then a post-msn adult health cns. thank you.
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   sirI
    If you decide to do this, I wish you luck, traumaRUs

    KUDOS TO YOU!!!!!
  4. by   traumaRUs
    I'm still in the "gathering more info" stage - lol. What do you thinK? Is the DNP worth it? My own take on it is that I'm 49 now and do plan to work until I'm 70 (it'll take that long to pay off my student loans - teeheehee). However, since I'm already an APN, I'll be grandfathered in when the doctorate requirement comes out. My concern is that: is it an accepted degree? And if accepted, will it boost my earning potential?
  5. by   CNM2B
    I think the DNP is definitely an "accepted" and valued degree. From what I hear, the DNP will be required for entry-into-practice as an advanced practice nurse within the next 15 years...if you are at all inclined, I say 'go for it!' Good luck with your decision!
  6. by   sirI
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I'm still in the "gathering more info" stage - lol. What do you thinK? Is the DNP worth it? My own take on it is that I'm 49 now and do plan to work until I'm 70 (it'll take that long to pay off my student loans - teeheehee). However, since I'm already an APN, I'll be grandfathered in when the doctorate requirement comes out. My concern is that: is it an accepted degree? And if accepted, will it boost my earning potential?

    Well, you know we've had all kinds of conversations about it here at allnurses.com

    Like you said, and I agree, it will more than likely be the entry into practice for the APN. Yes, it is an accepted degree already.

    As for boosting your earning potential, I rather doubt it, especially in the beginning. That remains to be seen and there will have to be precedence.

    I feel certain it will be like when the APN did not require an MSN to practice. Then, MSN became the entry into practice. All without it were grandfathered in. I also feel certain, once the DNP is entry-level, there will be 3rd party reimbursement issues (along with Medicaire/Medicaid); all will follow suit and require the newly practicing APN to have the entry-level degree (DNP) in order to collect.
  7. by   ILoveIceCream
    Hi, sirI.

    Do you think APNs who have been "grandfathered in" will have more difficulty with reimbursement as compared to APNs with DNPs? (once DNP is minimum for entry).
  8. by   sirI
    Good question.

    Right now, the current Medicare rule states that all nurse practitioners applying for a Medicare billing number must possess an MSN.

    Look for that to change once DNP is required.

    However, if the current MSN NP should change jobs or add to job duties and decides to get a Medicare number after the DNP becomes mandated, he/she will not be allowed.

    But, those already practicing as NP with MSN and have a Medicare number will not have to get a DNP in order to continue billing Medicare. This will apply to all newly educated DNPs only.
  9. by   SteveNNP
    I'm only in grad school for my Master's now, but the advice I'll give you is that education is rarely a waste of time. There is always something out there for you to learn, and improve your practice. It's great that the hospital will pay for you to attend school. If you are willing to commit the extra time back in school, It should be a rewarding experience for you, even if you don't see a pay or scope of practice increase right away. Best of luck!
  10. by   ILoveIceCream
    Hopefully I won't get in too much trouble for saying this.

    When I read about DNP programs--the required courses and course descriptions--a lot of it doesn't sound very interesting to me. It seems like much of the coursework is geared toward research and leadership/management. I'm more interested in direct patient care. I could see how these courses would be useful for someone wanting to go into administration or academia, but I question a bit how beneficial they are for the average practicing NP. Any thoughts?
  11. by   sirI
    We have that very conversation going on in this thread, ILoveIceCream:

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f34/doct...np-160044.html
  12. by   lalaxton
    Hey if your employer is willing to pay for it I say go! After looking at costs, many programs are very expensive.
    As far as earning potential I think you are looking at more flexibility in any potential job search rather than more income.
  13. by   dilleweed
    If it's being paid for, go for it! My thought is that once nursing schools start churning out DNP's, it can only benefit you to have one also. I'm probably going to go that route rather than get in one of the final MSN NP classes. It will also give me some time to work as an RN and be sure of which type of NP I want to be.
  14. by   traumaRUs
    Good ideas everyone. I appreciate the thoughts. Will look into this.

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