2015 DNP - page 11

I am wondering if anyone has heard any updates. Everything I keep seeing online from the AACN is "recommendation", "strongly encouraged", "highly suggested". I have yet to see anything, that says, "Look, either you... Read More

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    WOW, DR.TAMMY!
    Thank you for providing so much valuable INSIGHT on how a DNP contributed to your practice! VERY INSPIRATIONAL!

    I also enjoy research and would now consider obtaining a DNP. I'm currently a MSN-FNP student that will begin my program part-time, THIS AUGUST. I've always wondered what a DNP would bring to an already practicing NP. Your contribution was enlightening and informative. THANK YOU FOR SHARING!

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  2. 3
    Quote from BabyLady

    I'm Dr. Smith, I am your Cardiology resident.

    I'm Dr. Jones, I am your Anesthesiologist.

    I'm Dr. Doe, I am your General Surgeon

    I'm Dr. Patel, I am a Nurse Practitioner
    "One of these things is not like the others, one of these things just doesn't belong."
  3. 0
    Quote from BabyLady
    It is nurses, who stay with the patient for 12 hours a day and see, first-hand, how the subtle early signs of a disease process/condition begin to show.

    The vast majority of NP's have that nursing experience before they go to NP school.
    I'm not trying to be argumentative, I'm just curious -- do you have a source that documents that it is (still) the case that the "vast majority" (or even a small majority -- any majority at all ) of individuals going into NP programs are experienced RNs? Even with the incredible boom in direct-entry programs for non-nurses and the growing number of schools that take new grads with no experience? Sure, it used to be the case that nearly everyone who pursued NP (or any advanced practice specialty) education was an RN with years of experience -- but, with the number of people going into nursing nowadays who are only interested in being APNs, I doubt that that's still true.

    I hear lots of people on this site (and other places) defend the idea of NPs, or independent practice for NPs, with the ol' "but they have years of clinical experience before they even go to grad school" line, but it is often coming from people who have no idea how much nursing education has changed in the last 10-15 years (please note that I'm not saying you're necessarily one of those people -- I have no idea), and I have no idea whether there are actual numbers anywhere to support that.
  4. 0
    Nurse Tammy - your DNP from Duke has given you the skills to create a program and a chaired position, and has taught you how to do research.

    If this is what you wanted to do with your career, I'm curious why you chose a DNP degree versus a degree in health care administration?
  5. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    I'm not trying to be argumentative, I'm just curious -- do you have a source that documents that it is (still) the case that the "vast majority" (or even a small majority -- any majority at all ) of individuals going into NP programs are experienced RNs? Even with the incredible boom in direct-entry programs for non-nurses and the growing number of schools that take new grads with no experience? Sure, it used to be the case that nearly everyone who pursued NP (or any advanced practice specialty) education was an RN with years of experience -- but, with the number of people going into nursing nowadays who are only interested in being APNs, I doubt that that's still true.

    I hear lots of people on this site (and other places) defend the idea of NPs, or independent practice for NPs, with the ol' "but they have years of clinical experience before they even go to grad school" line, but it is often coming from people who have no idea how much nursing education has changed in the last 10-15 years (please note that I'm not saying you're necessarily one of those people -- I have no idea), and I have no idea whether there are actual numbers anywhere to support that.
    I understand what you are asking, but think about it.

    Very rarely do I see, even on Allnurses, post that they "just" graduated from nursing school and are going to immediately apply to an NP program. Some only work for a few years, but most of them do work first.

    I personally, have only met ONE and I know a ton of NP's.

    We have 8 in our unit currently going to NP school and every one of them had a minimum of 2 years of experience before going to NP school.

    No, I do not have documentation, but think about the common sense level of what you are suggesting, which would be the opposite...that the MAJORITY of NP's never worked as a floor nurse before getting their NP.

    There are thousands of NP's in this country...I would bet a year's salary the MAJORITY had experience before getting their MSN...I never said vast experience, I was simply suggesting SOME.

    I am currently in an RN-BSN program...out of 38 students, I had been out of school for one year before I started and I am the ONLY one in the class that had that small amount of experience.
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    So many years and steps to go through to become a DNP, I would choose medical school instead, seriously what's the point of becoming DNP!?
  7. 1
    To obtain the terminal degree in my field, not another one. Good luck to you Healthstar, I think you should choose medical school if that is where your heart lies. My heart has led me differently.
    ktliz likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from Boatswain2PA
    Nurse Tammy - your DNP from Duke has given you the skills to create a program and a chaired position, and has taught you how to do research.

    If this is what you wanted to do with your career, I'm curious why you chose a DNP degree versus a degree in health care administration?
    I'm not Dr. Tammy, and my career goals are somewhat different. However, if I may hazard a guess, it could be that Tammy does not want to limit herself, and enjoys the NP role in a variety of domains.

    That is part of the beauty of this career path, the opportunity to really evolve and actualize as you really want to! Tammy has set such a great example for us all. I am so proud of her, and her outstanding contributions to Nursing.
  9. 0
    Quote from BabyLady
    I understand what you are asking, but think about it.

    Very rarely do I see, even on Allnurses, post that they "just" graduated from nursing school and are going to immediately apply to an NP program. Some only work for a few years, but most of them do work first.

    I personally, have only met ONE and I know a ton of NP's.

    We have 8 in our unit currently going to NP school and every one of them had a minimum of 2 years of experience before going to NP school.

    No, I do not have documentation, but think about the common sense level of what you are suggesting, which would be the opposite...that the MAJORITY of NP's never worked as a floor nurse before getting their NP.

    There are thousands of NP's in this country...I would bet a year's salary the MAJORITY had experience before getting their MSN...I never said vast experience, I was simply suggesting SOME.

    I am currently in an RN-BSN program...out of 38 students, I had been out of school for one year before I started and I am the ONLY one in the class that had that small amount of experience.
    I hear what you're saying, and I am aware that many traditional advanced practice programs require some minimum amount of clinical experience to apply (although plenty don't), but are you considering the plethora of direct-entry MSN programs? When you talk about how few people post on AN about entering an NP program fresh out of nursing school, are you also considering the large number of posts by people who are in or looking to enter a direct entry program? I went to grad school (as an experienced RN) at a program that included a direct-entry program, and a large majority of my classmates were direct-entry students who were not nurses and had no prior healthcare experience. They went directly into advanced practice without ever having practiced a single day as a "regular" RN. That school turns out large numbers of direct-entry graduates every year (and v. few traditional, experienced RN graduates, although the administration spends a lot of time wondering why they have such trouble attracting traditional-student applicants). These programs are all over the country now. That's why I'm asking about any actual documentation. I don't know if it's the case that new NPs without previous nursing experience are the majority (of new NPs, that is, not the entire population of NPs) now, but I don't think it's safe to assume that's not the case.
  10. 0
    I have to say, while Elkpark and I (respectfully, I believe) disagree about the value and purpose of the DNP, I agree with her here Babylady. Anecdotal references and summaries are insufficient support for sweeping generalizations. You are going to need to cite firm statistics please.


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