Why do Critical Care nurses look down their noses at Med-Surg nurses? Why do Critical Care nurses look down their noses at Med-Surg nurses? - pg.6 | allnurses

Why do Critical Care nurses look down their noses at Med-Surg nurses? - page 6

I'm a med-surg nurse and proud to be one. I routinely care for 5-7 patients on day shift, who present with a variety of complex, acute conditions. Whenever I transfer a patient to a critical care... Read More

  1. Visit  mmm_016RN profile page
    #65 0
    As a brand new floor nurse...I find myself getting really frustrated on my shifts because I know it's such a rich learning environment but I just don't. have. time! I want to understand all the small details of what is happening with each patient, their particular pathophysiology, an in-depth assessment of interventions and rationales. I agree with what an above poster said that floor nurses are task oriented but in my limited experience, that's what I have to be to get through a shift. When I'm at work I make a mental note of something I don't understand or want to look up and I research it on my days off. I feel like I'm missing a lot of learning but it's simply because I NEED to stay on task.
  2. Visit  baleen profile page
    #66 0
    great post. the ego involved in these debates has me asking questions. Why are these nurses so ready to defend their egos? Is there an ego issue in nursing...ie: do people that go into nursing have trouble with carrying an adult ego with self responsible and actualized aspects.......or does nursing itself tend to tear them down?
  3. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    #67 1
    Quote from baleen
    great post. the ego involved in these debates has me asking questions. Why are these nurses so ready to defend their egos? Is there an ego issue in nursing...ie: do people that go into nursing have trouble with carrying an adult ego with self responsible and actualized aspects.......or does nursing itself tend to tear them down?
    Please use the Quote function so we know whose post you are admiring.

    No, there is not an ego issue in nursing. There may be an ego issue with some PEOPLE, and some of those people may be nurses. But the majority of those people aren't nurses. Lawyers, physicians, taxicab drivers, wait staff and folks from all walks of life have ego issues.
  4. Visit  baleen profile page
    #68 0
    Quote from Bluebolt
    This is an interesting thread that seems to be universal for nurses. I'm a travel ICU nurse and every location I've gone to has this same dynamic between floor nurses and ICU nurses. It's similar to the LPN vs. ADN vs. BSN debate. It all seems to stem from a root of ego, a sense of self.

    Strive to be confident in yourself, not just your title as an RN but really "yourself". I think if you try to do that you'll find this rampant issue in hospitals dissipates.


    knowing my self worth comes from the inside out and not from the outside in.




    Sorry. I think it was this quote and another that I cannot find about nurses getting pressure from all sides. People telling you what to do all over. Patients, Doctors, Family, etc etc. The hospital milieu puts nurses right in the middle. Being told what to do, not being respected over and over again....well I find it intolerable and I see how, long term it can wear on your sense of self worth. Most of the people treating you like an idiot have no idea where Lithuania is....can't name 3 people on the supreme court, may read one book a year, havent seen a New York Times or an Economist outside of a waiting room. And nursing school does not give nurses enough training in school to really understand deeply all that is going on with the patient. When I say deeply....I mean deeply. Chemical, full system, not just pressures and large compensatory mechanisms. Minute compensatory mechanisms. There is a problem that they focus on trying to make Nursing theory a disipline. It is lfe experience and humility. You have it or you don't. Focus on the natural life cycle of the human being....I say anyway. But I am often wrong.
  5. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    #69 0
    Quote from baleen
    Sorry. I think it was this quote and another that I cannot find about nurses getting pressure from all sides. People telling you what to do all over. Patients, Doctors, Family, etc etc. The hospital milieu puts nurses right in the middle. Being told what to do, not being respected over and over again....well I find it intolerable and I see how, long term it can wear on your sense of self worth. Most of the people treating you like an idiot have no idea where Lithuania is....can't name 3 people on the supreme court, may read one book a year, havent seen a New York Times or an Economist outside of a waiting room. And nursing school does not give nurses enough training in school to really understand deeply all that is going on with the patient. When I say deeply....I mean deeply. Chemical, full system, not just pressures and large compensatory mechanisms. Minute compensatory mechanisms. There is a problem that they focus on trying to make Nursing theory a disipline. It is lfe experience and humility. You have it or you don't. Focus on the natural life cycle of the human being....I say anyway. But I am often wrong.
    I'm not sure I understand your rather obscure post, but I feel subtly put down. I have never gone out looking for copies of "The New York Times" or "The Economist", but that seems like a very east coast centric idea anyway. Do I get points for seeking out the newspaper from the big city nearest to me, or does only the New York Times count? Do I get points for reading over 100 books a year, even if none of them are on the NYT best seller list?

    Nurses get pressure from physicians, management, patients, families, other services as well as from CNAs, biomes, housekeeping, dietary . . . All of that is true.

    I'm not sure what your point is.
  6. Visit  baleen profile page
    #70 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I'm not sure I understand your rather obscure post, but I feel subtly put down. I have never gone out looking for copies of "The New York Times" or "The Economist", but that seems like a very east coast centric idea anyway. Do I get points for seeking out the newspaper from the big city nearest to me, or does only the New York Times count? Do I get points for reading over 100 books a year, even if none of them are on the NYT best seller list?

    Nurses get pressure from physicians, management, patients, families, other services as well as from CNAs, biomes, housekeeping, dietary . . . All of that is true.

    I'm not sure what your point is.


    I am sorry you feel put down. It is my frustration writ small (on here). I have never found a nurse to be interested in the types of things I am interested in. It was judgmental and not related to the OP, unfortunately.


    So as to how it relates to the OP. It may be tangentially related to the OP and to my own question....that is....

    do ICU nurses have to deal with the constant lack of respect from so many people that med-surg nurses, with their large case loads and, perhaps, greater number of forced interactions, have to deal with?

    Do ICU nurses get more autonomy and respect is my basic question?

    My assesment of nurses getting a heap of disrespect from all comers is based only on med-surg. would I find less of these things in the ICU?
  7. Visit  Wile E Coyote profile page
    #71 1
    Quote from baleen
    I am sorry you feel put down. It is my frustration writ small (on here). I have never found a nurse to be interested in the types of things I am interested in. It was judgmental and not related to the OP, unfortunately.


    So as to how it relates to the OP. It may be tangentially related to the OP and to my own question....that is....

    do ICU nurses have to deal with the constant lack of respect from so many people that med-surg nurses, with their large case loads and, perhaps, greater number of forced interactions, have to deal with?

    Do ICU nurses get more autonomy and respect is my basic question?

    My assesment of nurses getting a heap of disrespect from all comers is based only on med-surg. would I find less of these things in the ICU?
    Collectively, yes on both fronts.
  8. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    #72 2
    Quote from baleen
    I am sorry you feel put down. It is my frustration writ small (on here). I have never found a nurse to be interested in the types of things I am interested in. It was judgmental and not related to the OP, unfortunately.


    So as to how it relates to the OP. It may be tangentially related to the OP and to my own question....that is....

    do ICU nurses have to deal with the constant lack of respect from so many people that med-surg nurses, with their large case loads and, perhaps, greater number of forced interactions, have to deal with?

    Do ICU nurses get more autonomy and respect is my basic question?

    My assesment of nurses getting a heap of disrespect from all comers is based only on med-surg. would I find less of these things in the ICU?
    I think some nurses deal with more disrespect than others. Perhaps ICU has something to do with it, but maybe not as much as you might think. I've found over the years that as people get to know you and to trust your judgement, knowledge base and work ethic, you get more respect. Getting to know the physicians,RTs, PTs, Pharmacists, etc. helps the respect factor as well. (Of course this assumes that you know your stuff, have your patients and your charts all in order, etc.)

    Make an effort to get to know your colleagues -- not just their names, but some tidbit about them that you can chat briefly about when you encounter them at work. The pulmonologists likes to scuba dive, the RT loves to fish and the nephrologist has a nephew in China that she loves to show off. So when you say hello, ask about a new picture of the nephew, did the RT go fishing last weekend and were they biting and if the pulmonologists had any luck with finding a new dive partner. Or whatever. People who think you're nice will be more respectful.

    I think ICU nurses get more respect partly because they have longer interactions with other members of the health care team, and thus have more of a chance to get to know one another. Part of it is perhaps the ICU mystique, where you know your patient more in-depth than a Med/Surg nurse ever can, and others assume you're smarter just because you can spout numbers at them all day.

    Family members and patients disrespect ICU nurses, too. I've been in ICU for decades, so I don't know the relative ratios of respect/disrespect, but I will say this:

    Years ago, when I injured my knee ice skating and could barely walk, the step down unit had just lost a monitor tech. Arrangements were made for me to cover their monitors for two weeks. The doctors all knew me, and some of the more senior nursing staff knew me, but the newer nurses and CNAs did not. I got a lot of disrespect and talking down to from the new nurses and CNAs. One time I paged a new nurse to tell her that her patient had just gone into A-Fib, and she disdainfully told me that I didn't know what I was talking about and that SHE would come out to the desk and set me straight. The cardiologist who happened to be in the nurse's station overheard the conversation and met her in her patient's room. "If Ruby says it's A fib, it's A Fib," he told her. The rest of my stint at the monitors went much more smoothly.

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