24/7 Video Cameras in ICU rooms - page 3

So I have a question for ya'll. I work in a large pedi cardiac ICU. Being cards a majority of our patients are newborn-toddler however we also have a population of 20-40 year olds (those... Read More

  1. Visit  holisticallyminded profile page
    1
    Agree that we are being monitored all the time. And from the tone of this post, it's more socially acceptable than some of us would like it to be.
    This is a liability game. The sole purpose is to absolve the facility of liability by placing blame on the individual. Sorry but there just isn't another reason to do it. It's very inexpensive technology that will save many thousands of dollars down the line.
    Another indication of the value of the worker.
    wooh likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  bradleau profile page
    0
    As a patient, I would not want to be on camera. Though with second thoughts, it would have caught those nurses who were abusive and tormenting. We have cameras in certain rooms for suicide watch and other issues such as getting up and being unstable. Of course the person watching those cameras also has to watch the heart monitors. Too much time lapse even if you were called on your cell phone.
  4. Visit  cjcerrn profile page
    0
    Check your signed Consents for Treatment- the form all patients have to sign regardless of their inpatient/outpatient status. Ours includes consenting to the video-taping. This is a whole different ballgame than publishing the film.
  5. Visit  royhanosn profile page
    0
    keeping an eye on the pediatric patient, it keeps an eye on high care kids, but big brother will be watching..aka lawsuits. covering admin's ass from litigation
    not dissimilar to jail cells close circuits on criminals in isolation (aka suicidal inmates).
    get used to it. I usually wave at the cameras.
    I love the military terms you use.
    you have to develop a sense of humour, because of the amount of paranoia out there now. Every one is afraid of their butts.
  6. Visit  RNMarykay profile page
    0
    I work on a tele/med surg floor and we have the capability to monitor every room. For awhile we had about six dedicated pt rooms with cameras for those extra confused ones and/or Baker Acts. But it got crazy when we would have to juggle people room to room to get the right ones on a camera. Now we have them in every room, but rarely turn them on unless someone is confused and a fall risk. Occasionally we watch something odd -- and actually caught a male boyfriend/"caregiver" stuffing his beloved with benzos. No wonder the woman had been in that state for a year. It led to a court intervention.

    HOWEVER, everyone is informed that they CAN be monitored and have the right to refuse. Given how we use it pt families are happy to have extra monitoring.

    As a unit secretary the camera option comes in handy when looking for a nurse to see if he/she is tied up as well as being able to see if staff is already with someone whose bed alarm is going off.

    I admit, it is a little creepy, and I would put a gown or glove over the camera if I were the pt. but it serves a purpose with careful use.
  7. Visit  Lavslady profile page
    0
    I WISH St. Joseph Hospital in Denver had video cameras. When I was visiting my ex-husband on the cardiology unit, both my wallet and his were stolen out of his room while we were out in the hallway for his 5 minute walk. It HAD to have been an employee, but no way to prove anything and our wallets were never recovered.
  8. Visit  thompd01 profile page
    0
    As a patient I would hate being video taped. As a nurse I agree if you know what your doing which you should; it shouldn't matter if you are being video taped or not. However, I see where some of the comments have a point, what's the purpose patient safety or to label blame on someone when something goes wrong.

    I have done some research on telemedicine though. I do believe that healthcare is headed that direction. I hope not for awhile though. I feel it is very impersonal. It will benefit cost but I feel decrease patient satisfaction. A number of times I have seen people become more at ease once the physician has been in the room and explained things. No technology can replace the touch of a human hand.

    If video taping is present, I feel patient's must be informed and have a right to choose if they are or aren't recorded.
  9. Visit  royhanosn profile page
    0
    agreed! it not for the staff, ICU is INTENSIVE care. But its up to the patient. If the patient is slipping in & out of groggy, yes. That what ICU means.
    Why would you leave valuables in a public room without lock & key. Why is his wallet in ICU lock. Someone KNEW where to look, lesson learned??
  10. Visit  umcRN profile page
    0
    Looking back at this old post, the transition to video camera's hasn't been the nightmare we all imagined. Our video camera's are used to review codes typically and see what went well/what didn't. It has not been used to place blame. We routinely do E-CPR (rapid deploy to ecmo) and this is a skill we practice monthly in a sim room but nothing beats being able to go back and review a real life situation to see where improvements can be made

    Turns out we also can turn the camera's to "privacy" mode (camera will turn and face the wall) per family/patient request.
  11. Visit  blucrna profile page
    0
    Hmmm I never pondered about the "creepy" aspect of having cameras in the icu. When I went for my interview, they showed me the impressive 40+ inch screen with all the patient rooms broken up into little boxes I said "wow this could really be helpful for patient care ". I never thought they could be watching me . Now I feel overly paranoid lol!
  12. Visit  J.R.theR.N2b profile page
    0
    my question deals with how each patient is informed that there will be a camera watching them. in almost all instances this is inserted as an aside in the consent form which, when signed by the patient, legalizes the process. i feel that each patient should be specifically told of the possibility of being on camera, after which their consent should be in writing and affixed to the medical record. if the patient refuses, how does this affect his care, other than the abscense of the camera surveillance? is the patient told how to make sure the cameras are indeed turned off? finally i feel that the use of these cameras constitute a serious breach of patient privacy unless IMFORMED consent is obtained from the patient, and that this is way too important an issue to be relegated to an aside in fine print on the consent form. i realize the importance of all the information that these cameras can yield, and how much easier it is on the staff to obtain, but patient knowledge of and consent to the use of these cameras should and must trump whatever advantages these may give the staff. after all is said and done, the patient is the legal master of what is done to them.
  13. Visit  umcRN profile page
    0
    Quote from J.R.theR.N2b
    my question deals with how each patient is informed that there will be a camera watching them. in almost all instances this is inserted as an aside in the consent form which, when signed by the patient, legalizes the process. i feel that each patient should be specifically told of the possibility of being on camera, after which their consent should be in writing and affixed to the medical record. if the patient refuses, how does this affect his care, other than the abscense of the camera surveillance? is the patient told how to make sure the cameras are indeed turned off? finally i feel that the use of these cameras constitute a serious breach of patient privacy unless IMFORMED consent is obtained from the patient, and that this is way too important an issue to be relegated to an aside in fine print on the consent form. i realize the importance of all the information that these cameras can yield, and how much easier it is on the staff to obtain, but patient knowledge of and consent to the use of these cameras should and must trump whatever advantages these may give the staff. after all is said and done, the patient is the legal master of what is done to them.
    Good point. I work in peds though so...no we don't really get any kind of consent, and our cameras are almost useless as the only thing you can see is the patient and SOMETIMES the monitor (which makes reviewing a code difficult), for instance in a code you can't see what the crowd is doing or see if the team was working well together. All you can see is the patient, the person bagging and the one doing chest compressions.

    In reply to another poster our cameras dont have a central "viewing" screen. And I don't even know how to access the videos, they are used for codes only (and in one instance where we had a crib malfunction and a baby fell out...he was ok!) and I think only the medical directors and leadership staff have access to them.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top