Scared to death of losing first CNA job

  1. 0
    I wanted to start off with saying that I'm very happy to have found this forum. It is very informative and I know there is much to be found here. I also have a lot of respect for the people in this line of work and look forward to starting my new job next week. What that being said...
    I got my first CNA job less than a week ago after having been out of class for two months and being umemployed for a year. I moved to Florida from Missouri and previously worked in fast food. I was interviewed and within about 2 minutes of the start of the interview, I knew I had the job. The person interviewing me said that she was impressed that I had recognized the quality of care their facility provides after doing some research online. Obviously, I do care about the quality of care I will provide.
    Anyway, the facility has what appears to be a low turnover rate for CNAs and my interviewer told me that she rarely hires inexperienced CNAs but was impressed by me. I have two days of orientation next week and then 30 (yes, thirty) days of training.
    I just have this nagging feeling in my head that I am going to be fired for not being a fast learner (I personally emphasize doing things slowly and correctly instead of quickly). I know most people do not function this way but I am not most people. I'm just scared to death of being fired because of my slow learning ability. The fact of being umemployed for a year and the fact that the job market is horrible does not ease my tension either.
    Is there anything I can tell myself or do on the job that will ease this feeling? This appears to be a good facility and looks to be a positive experience and I don't want to blow it.
    P.S...I apologize for this being so long. Thank you for your input.
    Last edit by SnowbirdinFL on Aug 24, '09 : Reason: wrong word used
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I had 5 days of training. It is very hard and frustrating being a new CNA, so my advice is to not set unrealistic expectations for yourself. Much of the job is memorization- where things are, and where they go, resident preferences, etc... That stuff takes time to learn, and you should go in knowing that. I don't think you will be fired for being slow at first. A truly reputable facility will be appreciative of your commitment to the job, and to giving quality care.

    Spend your training soaking in everything around you. At the end of the month you will probably feel overwhelmed to be on your own. Just try to get your routine down, and don't sweat the small stuff. Everyone progresses at different rates.
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
  5. 0
    Thank you very much for making me feel a bit better. Some of my fear regarding being fired comes from working for two days at a job in another field and not being put on the schedule for following weeks (basically being fired, just indirectly) due to the fact that apparently I was supposed to know how to know the in and outs of this job with two days of training with people that spoke little English. (BTW, I am not trying to be offensive to anyone with that prior statement. I am just being honest about what happened.) I even told the employer in that situation that I do not learn things quickly. I'm just sick of being unemployed and what to put my CNA training to use. I consider myself lucky that I will be working at a highly-rated facility and look forward to my first day on the job.
    Last edit by SnowbirdinFL on Aug 24, '09 : Reason: wrong word used
  6. 0
    Quote from SnowbirdinFL
    Anyway, the facility has what appears to be a low turnover rate for CNAs and my interviewer told me that she rarely hires inexperienced CNAs but was impressed by me. I have two days of orientation next week and then 30 (yes, thirty) days of training.
    I wouldn't worry. At my first nurse aide job, we were supposed to have 2 days of orientation about the hospital, then 7 days of training, then we had to pass a basic exam to show we were proficient in the field.

    I had taken a nurse aide training course, but never took the certification exam. They allowed me to take the exam early (after the 2 days of hospital orientation) and I passed the exam. I had on the job training for 6 shifts (2 weeks) where I gradually started doing less shadowing and more doing.

    My last day of orientation, the floor was short, so I flew solo and I didn't have any problems. Everything has gone great. My 30 day review was all good and I'm enjoying my job.

    I, like you, was also inexperienced with no previous CNA experience. I don't do blood draws (the lab comes up and does those) but I do EKGs, which are so simple to perform (wasn't expecting that).

    You'll be fine!!
  7. 0
    well first off you should relax. you will do fine and should be glad you got a job everyone feels the way you feel when they start a new job. just have confidence in yourself and you'll do great. don't fire yourself before you even start the job...wish you luck!
  8. 0
    I was the same way. I was so self-conscious and nervous that I got flustered and made things worse for myself. Expect to be stressed out and feel stupid- but just try to roll with it and know that it will get better. You'll get faster and more efficient as time goes on.

    Don't try to do everything perfectly right away. The thing you have to worry about the most are safety measures like alarms, floor pads, bed position, etc. Before you leave a room make sure all that sort of crap is taken care of. When I first got off training one of my residents fell out of bed. I had the alarm on and the floor pads in place but I did not lower her bed to the floor. I thought for sure I'd get fired. I have never ever done anything like that again! It was burned into my brain.
  9. 1
    It's okay to be worried about getting fired after hearing such great expectations from the hiring squad when you're fresh out of school. As far as 30 day training, I understand because I've watched a many jobs hire in people and have their bedside manner be for the birds. As long as its paid training .. zinga! But on a side note being a CNA isn't as hard IMO as everybody says it is. Yes, days can be challenging but any job working with the public is going to be hard but the main requirements in being a CNA is having "common sense" and morals. Knowing right from wrong, knowing when ethics take part ... its real easy if you look at it from a different perspective. Being a CNA can be a tough job, no doubt, but with a little bit of confidence, self motivation and a smile ... you can achieve anything that may come your way. Even if you're a slow learner ... you'll get the hang out of it. Hang in there!
    Serendipity, PCT likes this.
  10. 0
    Can I just say that I am glad that you posted this, because I have nearly the same exact issue, on the slow-learning part. I wish I was a fast learner.
    ---------------

    Quote from SnowbirdinFL
    I wanted to start off with saying that I'm very happy to have found this forum. It is very informative and I know there is much to be found here. I also have a lot of respect for the people in this line of work and look forward to starting my new job next week. What that being said...
    I got my first CNA job less than a week ago after having been out of class for two months and being umemployed for a year. I moved to Florida from Missouri and previously worked in fast food. I was interviewed and within about 2 minutes of the start of the interview, I knew I had the job. The person interviewing me said that she was impressed that I had recognized the quality of care their facility provides after doing some research online. Obviously, I do care about the quality of care I will provide.
    Anyway, the facility has what appears to be a low turnover rate for CNAs and my interviewer told me that she rarely hires inexperienced CNAs but was impressed by me. I have two days of orientation next week and then 30 (yes, thirty) days of training.
    I just have this nagging feeling in my head that I am going to be fired for not being a fast learner (I personally emphasize doing things slowly and correctly instead of quickly). I know most people do not function this way but I am not most people. I'm just scared to death of being fired because of my slow learning ability. The fact of being umemployed for a year and the fact that the job market is horrible does not ease my tension either.
    Is there anything I can tell myself or do on the job that will ease this feeling? This appears to be a good facility and looks to be a positive experience and I don't want to blow it.
    P.S...I apologize for this being so long. Thank you for your input.
  11. 0
    Wonder how the OP ever made out.
    Last edit by Paws2people on Aug 5, '12 : Reason: Old post


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