PCT and CNA whats the difference

  1. 1 Hey guys, well I went to my local vocational school and I notice that they offer 2 programs CNA and patient care tech. The CNA program is only 4wks and much cheaper and the PCT is 6mths $1100. I started looking for jobs in that field and most employers (hospitals) ask for either PCT or CNA to do the same job. Why would you go to a PCT program over CNA they seem like its the same thing. I also notice that the PCT program description says that you train to be a CNA,HHA (Home Health Aid) certified and a little of EKG and phlebotomy but not cirtified. I was thinking of just doing the CNA 4wks and then get certified for EKG and phlebotomy which takes another 5mths...what do you think
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    Visit  KdnRN2B profile page

    About KdnRN2B

    From 'Florida'; 29 Years Old; Joined Aug '08; Posts: 55; Likes: 8.

    22 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  genaluvya profile page
    1
    A pct is a cna that has phelbotomy and ekg certification.
    I think that it will equal up to the same amount if you did phelbotomy and ekg seperately vs. pct.
    KdnRN2B likes this.
  5. Visit  sonomala profile page
    2
    If if you want to be a lpn or rn go for cna. If this is the end of your educational plans go PCT
    mzrogue and KdnRN2B like this.
  6. Visit  Okami_RN profile page
    0
    It really does not matter, I am a CNA and I worked for a hospital that trained me to do phlebotomy and EKG, now I work as a PCT at a different hospital. In my opinion its just a matter of title.
  7. Visit  jennileigh8182 profile page
    0
    It may vary by area. Where I live, there were three class offerings:

    1. Acute care
    2. Long-term care
    3. Acute and Long-term care

    Acute care trains PCTs and the class is shorter. Long-term care prepares the student for being a CNA and entitles them to take their certification exam. I personally chose option 3 - so I'm ready for both. The hospital job postings around here state either/or situations, so I figured that knowing BOTH could make me more marketable.
  8. Visit  mizfradd profile page
    0
    Quote from happyloser
    It really does not matter, I am a CNA and I worked for a hospital that trained me to do phlebotomy and EKG, now I work as a PCT at a different hospital. In my opinion its just a matter of title.

    Same here, I was trained at the hospital (while employed as a CNA) and then was considered a PCT or in my state, we are also called CNA Level 2.

    I have never worked LTCF. I've worked med/surg/ICU & psych hospitals & now am in public health. Loved each area I worked in!
  9. Visit  jajwalker05 profile page
    0
    I work in a hospital, and took a cna coarse. I'm considered a PCT until I take my state exam. I am just a cna, with out a certificate basicly
  10. Visit  RN2BMU2009 profile page
    0
    Kind of confusing to me. I think the title differs where you work at...I am a patient care technician in a hospital but certified as a CNA and I have NEVER even heard of a patient technician course...I just thought that the title was different depending upon where you work at. We do things that would not be encountered in a nursing home setting such as glucose monitoring, EKG, phlebotomy, specimens etc. I would say do the CNA class and if you decide to work somewhere such as a hospital where you would be a patient care tech, they should train you on all of the other things...
  11. Visit  GigiNYC profile page
    0
    You should take the CNA course first. The EKG and Phlebotomy can be done at a later time. Look for other schools that offer them, it really doesnt take that long for a phlebotomy and EKG to be acquired.
  12. Visit  Billsgirl profile page
    0
    I'm a CNA but my job title is PCT...with no extra training except from the nurses on my unit. Does being a PCT mean that you are able to actually DO MORE than a CNA??
  13. Visit  RN2BMU2009 profile page
    0
    Quote from Billsgirl
    I'm a CNA but my job title is PCT...with no extra training except from the nurses on my unit. Does being a PCT mean that you are able to actually DO MORE than a CNA??
    I beleive that this is the case as CNA's in nursing homes cannot do glucose checks (At least that's the case in the state I live in). EKG's and phlebotomy you have to be trained per request of your department. I just think that in a hospital you have the oppurtunity to encounter more procedures that you can do within your scope of practice that you wouldn't get in a nursing home.
  14. Visit  flightnurse2b profile page
    1
    PCT's have additional training in EKG and phleb, as well as depending on your state.... i know FL has a wide scope for PCT's, and in NC a PCT is equal to a CNA-II... both can perform bolus G-tube feedings, IV insertion, NGT insertion, trach care and foley cath insertion.

    in the hospital i worked in, all EMT's/medics were also called PCT's. but it probably varies from state to state and hospital to hospital.

    i would say go for the PCT program. you get all the excellent bedside skills that you would with a CNA course with additional skill sets that may help you if you decide to go back to nursing school.

    good luck
    PhoenixTech likes this.
  15. Visit  ygashjr27 profile page
    0
    to FLIGHTNURSE2BE...

    i am a cna and i am going to be moving to FL in a couple months and i'm getting so confused trying to apply for a job in a hospital because i don't see any jobs available for cnas but theres a bunch for pcts and the requirements for the pct job is to have a cna certificate so im confused as to whether the pct job IS the cna job but different title.would you know offhand which hospitals only want cnas or only want pcts? or which will offer education to cnas for the ekgs and phlebotemy?


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