how much more do you get paid for being a CNA instead of an uncertified aide?

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    I became an STNA and worked as one for a while in Ohio, but in September I moved to California. I was planning to get my CNA certification transferred but it seemed like a lot of work, and I managed to get 2 home care jobs without getting my certification, so I stopped worrying about it.

    Both jobs are through care agencies and I get paid by the agency, but in both cases I only work for one client and don't have much interaction with anyone from the agency. When I started working at the first agency, I was told that I would get paid more if I was a CNA, but I don't know how much. I wasn't told this at the second agency, and there isn't anyone I can ask.

    I get $10.50 an hour for both these jobs, which was good in Ohio but is minimum wage in San Francisco where I live. Things are more expensive here and so I am motivated to try to transfer my CNA license, but just like before, it seems so overwhelming, and I don't know how much more I would make. Is there some kind of legal standard about getting paid more if you're a CNA, than just an uncertified person doing the same work?
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Not sure about the legal standard, but at the LTC facility I work at, if you aren't state certified, you make minimum wage. If you are state certified, you make $2 more.
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    thanks
  5. 0
    Quote from afwv
    I became an STNA and worked as one for a while in Ohio, but in September I moved to California. I was planning to get my CNA certification transferred but it seemed like a lot of work, and I managed to get 2 home care jobs without getting my certification, so I stopped worrying about it.

    Both jobs are through care agencies and I get paid by the agency, but in both cases I only work for one client and don't have much interaction with anyone from the agency. When I started working at the first agency, I was told that I would get paid more if I was a CNA, but I don't know how much. I wasn't told this at the second agency, and there isn't anyone I can ask.

    I get $10.50 an hour for both these jobs, which was good in Ohio but is minimum wage in San Francisco where I live. Things are more expensive here and so I am motivated to try to transfer my CNA license, but just like before, it seems so overwhelming, and I don't know how much more I would make. Is there some kind of legal standard about getting paid more if you're a CNA, than just an uncertified person doing the same work?
    If you are certified you should get more pay than someone that has not been to a CNA program and got certified. Those that are not certified are mainly considered caregiver or resident aide and get paid less depending on the facility. It really all depends on the agency or facility but usually someone that is certified and went through a CNA program gets paid more than someone who has not. There is alot of places that will hire for caregiver or resident care and most of the time it is all non-medical doing similar things as a CNA but because it is non-medical they will pay you less those are usually agencies. I would make sure you look into steady work at a facility and know they are paying you CNA pay and not caregiver/resident aide pay which is usually a few dollars more a hour depending on the shift you choose to work.
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    Depends on the facility.

    Some will not let you on without certification. Usually this is either the better places or cities where CNAs have flooded the market and they can demand that.

    Most HRs have a chart they go by based on experience and certification.

    Still other cheap admins do not care if you are right off the street or have 20 years CNA as long as you have no felonies or have complaints at the registry - they pay minumum wage or a bit above.
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    This is interesting. I know of home health agencies that employ people to do chores like washing dishes, cooking, cleaning, running errands, and these people arent CNAs, but I always though to work in any sort of LTC facility doing any sort of care or assisting with ADLs, the people had to be CNAs primarily to to track any abuse or neglect findings against them.

    In the case of the home health agencies, in addition to these uncertified people who provide assistance, they also have actual CNAs who travel to homes and do cares. I wonder which specific tasks require someone to be a CNA, and which dont. Seems like it would be a gray area to me.
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    well I don't work in LTC now, I work for a home health agency, and the first agency was basically just having me do chores. if that is because I'm not CNA-certified they didn't tell me but maybe if I get CNA certified they will have me do actual ADLs. it was really driving me crazy that they were giving me those jobs but I didn't know why and I thought that's just what home health was like.

    thanks.
  9. 0
    Quote from funtimes
    This is interesting. I know of home health agencies that employ people to do chores like washing dishes, cooking, cleaning, running errands, and these people arent CNAs, but I always though to work in any sort of LTC facility doing any sort of care or assisting with ADLs, the people had to be CNAs primarily to to track any abuse or neglect findings against them.

    In the case of the home health agencies, in addition to these uncertified people who provide assistance, they also have actual CNAs who travel to homes and do cares. I wonder which specific tasks require someone to be a CNA, and which dont. Seems like it would be a gray area to me.
    Some states crack down on the sitters/companions too. I know of two states that have DPCW registries.

    What CNA is required for brings up a good question. It seems that our registry is merely to track us in case an abuser appears in our number. The boards for other areas of allied health do that as well, but have requirements to industry as to what each position (RN,OT,X-Ray, Respiratory) can and can not do as opposed to someone just off the street.
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    Where I work, there's an assisted living attached to the SNF. For a while, CNAs (in SNF)and RA (resident assistants, only in AL) made the same amount, at $10.25, then $10.50. Then they did an evaluation of average pay in the area for CNAs and nurses and the RAs still make 10.50, but CNA base pay has moved up to 11.75.

    So, I think it depends on the facility, but I would look into it.
  11. 1
    In California it looks like $8.00 an hour. If I see one more job posting with $8 an hour pay I'm going to scream. The ones that really get me are the ones like this one Right At Home. They want a CNA with a minimum of 3 years exp. and the pay is a $8.00 per hour. It gets even better when they require you to be bilingual...still paying $8 per hour.

    What a joke.
    nguyency77 likes this.


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