If you became CRNA for the money did you end up...... - page 4

End up loving it? I'm strongly considering CRNA school for many reasons but primarily the salary. My opinion toward anesthesia right now is that it's not a passion or anything, I don't love it, I... Read More

  1. by   Gassadist
    Ruby vee.....There are many jobs in Midwest and other areas where you get 220 to 250k for 40 hours plus 1 call weekly or biweekly.
  2. by   Gassadist
    CRNAs are getting ALMOST equal to family physicians and pediatricians.
  3. by   ICUman
    Thankfully, barrier to entry is high and able to block people only in it for the money. If not, it would flood like the NP market and salaries would drop substantially. I'm glad the admission requirements and program material are so rigorous. It filters out the undedicated with only dollar signs in their eyes.
  4. by   paramedic-RN
    Quote from ICUman
    Thankfully, barrier to entry is high and able to block people only in it for the money. If not, it would flood like the NP market and salaries would drop substantially. I'm glad the admission requirements and program material are so rigorous. It filters out the undedicated with only dollar signs in their eyes.

    ICUman you sound a little judg-ey of people who are financially motivated. You never know why someone is financially motivated unless you know their life. For all you know I could supporting a family member that takes an insanely expensive lifelong medication, or maybe my identity was stolen and I'm digging myself out of someone else's massive debt. Not everyone who is financially motivated is just trying to buy diamonds and jet skii's.

    In addition you can be an excellent provider regardless of your motivation to get in the field.
    Last edit by paramedic-RN on Jul 25 : Reason: Add
  5. by   paramedic-RN
    Thanks so far for everyone's input, it's given me a lot to think about. I've decided that I don't think I'll pursue CRNA school for now. In the future I'll maybe re-visit the idea and shadow some CRNA's but it sounds like what helps you get through CRNA school is the passion for it which I am lacking so for now I'll say goodbye to it.
  6. by   prelift
    money always plays somewhat of a factor and one should not be guilty of that. I don't think I would medicine for 50k per year for life, but it is a great and interesting job.


    More than likely people would not CRNA for 50k either, not when less stressful or full of liability jobs are out there.

    If anybody wants to chase pure cash though go be a financial engineer for big banks.
  7. by   06crna
    I became a CRNA for two reasons: 1. A bedside nursing role did not offer sufficient autonomy or intellectual challenge despite several unit changes (perioperative (non-OR), adult/pediatric ICU, ER) and 2. money.

    12 years later, having experienced multiple anesthesia practice types from solo independent to heavily-managed supervision employed by Anesthesia Management Companies, I can say with certainty that you SHOULD NOT pursue this career unless you enjoy nursing, modern health care, the OR environment, and anesthesia. It took 3 years out of my life to get through school, 5 years to pay my loans, and 7 more to save enough to change careers entirely at 45. I will retire from anesthesia within a year.

    I still remember meeting my Program Director a few months into school and explaining my doubts, but I persevered for the payoff. I absolutely regret my decision and would never take this path again.
    Last edit by 06crna on Jul 26
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from paramedic-RN
    ICUman you sound a little judg-ey of people who are financially motivated. You never know why someone is financially motivated unless you know their life. For all you know I could supporting a family member that takes an insanely expensive lifelong medication, or maybe my identity was stolen and I'm digging myself out of someone else's massive debt. Not everyone who is financially motivated is just trying to buy diamonds and jet skii's.

    In addition you can be an excellent provider regardless of your motivation to get in the field.
    If these are your motivations for going to anesthesia school, how in the world are you going to afford anesthesia school in the first place?
  9. by   jprn2018
    Quote from 06crna
    I became a CRNA for two reasons: 1. A bedside nursing role did not offer sufficient autonomy or intellectual challenge despite several unit changes (perioperative (non-OR), adult/pediatric ICU, ER) and 2. money.

    12 years later, having experienced multiple anesthesia practice types from solo independent to heavily-managed supervision employed by Anesthesia Management Companies, I can say with certainty that you SHOULD NOT pursue this career unless you enjoy nursing, modern health care, the OR environment, and anesthesia. It took 3 years out of my life to get through school, 5 years to pay my loans, and 7 more to save enough to change careers entirely at 45. I will retire from anesthesia within a year.

    I still remember meeting my Program Director a few months into school and explaining my doubts, but I persevered for the payoff. I absolutely regret my decision and would never take this path again.
    If you could go back in time (knowing that bedside nursing wasn't for you), would you have pursued becoming a Nurse Practitioner (FNP or ACNP) instead? Or would you have remained a bedside nurse?
  10. by   06crna
    Neither. I would have left nursing altogether.
  11. by   paramedic-RN
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    If these are your motivations for going to anesthesia school, how in the world are you going to afford anesthesia school in the first place?
    Same way everyone else does, save up money and loans. I guess I"m confused about your point with motivation vs. getting through school.
  12. by   paramedic-RN
    Quote from 06crna
    I became a CRNA for two reasons: 1. A bedside nursing role did not offer sufficient autonomy or intellectual challenge despite several unit changes (perioperative (non-OR), adult/pediatric ICU, ER) and 2. money.

    12 years later, having experienced multiple anesthesia practice types from solo independent to heavily-managed supervision employed by Anesthesia Management Companies, I can say with certainty that you SHOULD NOT pursue this career unless you enjoy nursing, modern health care, the OR environment, and anesthesia. It took 3 years out of my life to get through school, 5 years to pay my loans, and 7 more to save enough to change careers entirely at 45. I will retire from anesthesia within a year.

    I still remember meeting my Program Director a few months into school and explaining my doubts, but I persevered for the payoff. I absolutely regret my decision and would never take this path again.
    Geez sorry you had to go through that, thanks for sharing your story though, helps solidify my thoughts. Just curious what's next for you?
    Last edit by paramedic-RN on Jul 29 : Reason: add
  13. by   jj224
    If you're looking into making more money without the 3 year period of no income during school, look into becoming a medical device sales rep. If you get high enough, you can make great money doing that. I think the only prerequisites for doing that job is that you have to be able to kiss a** and be good looking (I'm out!).

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