How much do you make? - page 7

Now, before I get blown up with comments saying "it's not about money, but patient care". I get that. No need to tell me over and over. I heard CRNAs mainly get hired in rural areas, which kind of... Read More

  1. by   CRNA 1984
    The truth is... CRNAs work everywhere from rural to big cities. The reason you are more likely to find a Nurse Anesthetist in a rural setting, as opposed to an anesthesiologist, is that CRNAs are more cost effective and provide the same level of care. There was recent legislation that was going to change that and increase the level of reimbursements for anesthesiologists in rural settings, but the bills didn't pass. So it is safe to say that CRNAs will continued to be used more than MDAs in these types of locations.

    Next...Why does working in a rural area scare you? By the time you graduate from CRNA school you will be more than prepared to work as a CRNA. I would recommend applying for a job where ever you do your clinicals. This makes the transition easy, because you already know the staff, hospital, routine, etc. Thats what I did.

    Finally... a CRNA's salary depends on a lot of factors:
    1. Are you 1099 or W2
    2. Years of experience
    3. Location (biggest impact on salary) (Good article: "How Much do CRNAs Make")

    I am a CRNA and work as a self-contractor (so 1099). This allows me to write off a lot of business expenses and save money on taxes. If you go this route, you will want to get a good CPA. I wish you the best of luck in school!
  2. by   Wolf at the Door
    90k's in Florida I am not surprised a friend of mine made that in Texas as an RN not CRNA. Heck I made 10k in one month working 8-9 shifts per check. Its all about location.
  3. by   Codyhaas3337
    How did you find the job out of anesthesia school as a partner? Is it rare to find practices that you can buy into?
  4. by   Bluebolt
    Quote from Codyhaas3337
    How did you find the job out of anesthesia school as a partner? Is it rare to find practices that you can buy into?
    My CRNA program requires a few months rotation in a CRNA only practice. Many times if you do well with them they will extend an offer to be a part of their practice after graduation (if they need anyone). Then after a little time, it's possible to buy into the practice if the partner's consent. I don't know if I've heard of someone coming right out of CRNA school and becoming partner without even showing they are a competent independent practitioner.

    Our professors gave us the heads up that nearing graduation we're going to think we're rockstars who know everything about anesthesia and get cocky. Then two years into practice we'll look back and see that we really didn't know as much as we thought we did about clinical practice.
  5. by   CABGx4
    I'm I western PA and made almost 180k last year with some OT in there. In general, big cities will pay less than small rural cities and towns. I have friends that moved to rural Texas and made a base salary of 200k. CRNA demand is on the rise so don't believe the naysayers. There's tons of jobs right now and sign on bonuses are coming back. It was hard to get where I'm at but this job is worth all the effort
  6. by   superking
    I have a question.The salaries people post here are based on how many hours?Is it 40 hour?
  7. by   bibibi
    Good question. Most of the time the salaries posted here are based on more than 40 hour work week. Most CRNAs that make higher salaries work over 40 hours a week and take call. Those who don't make in lower 100s.
  8. by   Bluebolt
    Quote from bibibi
    Good question. Most of the time the salaries posted here are based on more than 40 hour work week. Most CRNAs that make higher salaries work over 40 hours a week and take call. Those who don't make in lower 100s.
    Please just go on gasworks.com and just look at the job listings. Most positions give you a range of salaries to expect and none of them include pre-calculated mandatory overtime. I think you'll find that you're very wrong about most CRNAs making in the lower 100's if they aren't working overtime.
  9. by   bibibi
    I know it first hand. Go ahead and look at the salaries in Florida and major cities. For 40 hour work week they will be in low 100s.
  10. by   Bluebolt
    Quote from bibibi
    I know it first hand. Go ahead and look at the salaries in Florida and major cities. For 40 hour work week they will be in low 100s.
    Ah, now if you change your original statement from "most CRNAs" to "Florida CRNAs" then I completely agree with you. I always liked vacationing in Florida and considered living there one day but after hearing firsthand from CRNAs how terrible the market is there I'll be finding different beaches to reside on.

    Not only does Florida pay probably the lowest out of all 50 states but they are also one of the few states that allow AAs to practice there, which is probably why the pay is terrible.

    CRNAs who accept positions that pay significantly less than the national average ($170K) are perpetuating the problem. If I'm an employer and i know somebody will take a job for less why would I pay them more?
  11. by   bibibi
    Florida is not the only state that pays low. Check out Arkansas or Tennessee. Most jobs that don't have their salaries posted pay in low 100s.
  12. by   Bluebolt
    Quote from bibibi
    Florida is not the only state that pays low. Check out Arkansas or Tennessee. Most jobs that don't have their salaries posted pay in low 100s.
    I live in TN. The hospital down the road starts new grads around $150-160K and a CRNA with more experience said he's getting closer to $180K. Vanderbilt in Nashville pays pretty low but that's typical for academic research hospitals saturated in MDAs. No AAs in TN, that helps keep the pay closer to the national average.

    Although Florida is famous for how terribly low they pay I'm sure there are a few other states that pay on the lower side of the spectrum, it's just not the norm. My original statement was just to clarify that the national average for CRNA pay is $170K so saying most CRNAs get in the lower $100K is factually wrong.

    I'm sorry if for some reason you were forced to take a job paying in the lower 100K and you should know your skills and training are worth more in the market. Don't sell yourself short.
  13. by   bibibi
    There is more to CRNA income than just the salary figure. If one is making 170k as independent contractor do the math and see how much you have left after paying all the taxes and purchasing benefits for you and your family. So 170k for 40 hours a week and full benefits is ok. Not otherwise.

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