How much do you make? - page 6

Now, before I get blown up with comments saying "it's not about money, but patient care". I get that. No need to tell me over and over. I heard CRNAs mainly get hired in rural areas, which kind of... Read More

  1. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Can you share what area of the country this is? No need to get very specific.
  2. Visit  subee profile page
    2
    NYC - tri-state region. $150,000. Property taxes $16,100 for raised ranch. Think that says it all.
    Jules A and PMFB-RN like this.
  3. Visit  AmiK profile page
    3
    I made $210,000 last year. But I work about 70-80 hours of OT per month. That is in the Midwest in an ACT practice with almost total autonomy.
    cocoa_puff, Jules A, and PMFB-RN like this.
  4. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    3
    This is what is so discouraging to me. In my hospital an experienced (10+ years) critical care RN who works nights and every other weekend will normally make about $115K- $130k/year without working any OT. RN with 20+ years are making $140K or so. This is a reasonable COL area of the upper Midwest.
    It makes the investment into NA school seem kinda iffy. I suppose there is the greater autonomy to consider. In addition the CRNA would be more portable with that income level where any of our nurses who move out of the area is going to find lower wages, or high COL or both.
    calivianya, Jules A, and AllIcanbe like this.
  5. Visit  calivianya profile page
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    This is what is so discouraging to me. In my hospital an experienced (10+ years) critical care RN who works nights and every other weekend will normally make about $115K- $130k/year without working any OT. RN with 20+ years are making $140K or so. This is a reasonable COL area of the upper Midwest.
    Just have to say - unless it really is the autonomy you are looking for, that's a really good deal and I wouldn't make the jump. I have a coworker that managed to crack 100k last year because she worked sixty hours a week every week and received a lot of incentive pay, but most of the experienced ICU nurses in these parts make under 60k if they're just working full time. I make a hair under 50k with no overtime, including my night shift differential. My day shift coworkers get about 41k/year, assuming they make my base pay. I have seen a CRNA posting with salary info listed at $57/hr here on a hospital website, which comes out to under 120k if the assumption is 40 hours/week with no differential.
  6. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    I have never heard of such a low CRNA salary since the 90's. Which state? The field is getting and it is expected that salaries will drop. I can't imagine that slot would ever get filled. I never lived anywhere with a COL either, so that makes a huge difference. My property taxes were over 16,000 making the dollar much smaller.
  7. Visit  calivianya profile page
    1
    Quote from subee
    I have never heard of such a low CRNA salary since the 90's. Which state? The field is getting and it is expected that salaries will drop. I can't imagine that slot would ever get filled. I never lived anywhere with a COL either, so that makes a huge difference. My property taxes were over 16,000 making the dollar much smaller.
    NC - and I don't think really had problems filling the slots because it never seemed like they stayed up for long. If you want to work in a hospital, that's about what the pay is here, at least starting out.

    Here's a good example within a 45 minute drive of where I live - their range is 110k-140k. I also like how the position specifies that CRNAs will NOT earn time and a half for work over 40 hours/week.

    Then again, there are six CRNA programs in my state, and I could drive to any of them in less than three hours, so it's not exactly hard to find CRNA grads around here.
    Last edit by calivianya on Jul 7
    ICUman likes this.
  8. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    And that's what happens when you pump students out like gas. My program accepted 10 students (back in the 80's). One dropped out the first week. All classes were taught by university staff. Now there are 38 students scattered over several states and there is no university presence at these sites.
    Our profession is shooting itself in the feet.
  9. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    0
    It is illegal to limit the number of SRNAs at the accreditation level. What the COA and AANA are doing is increasing the training requirements of SRNAs, eliminating schools that are not regionally accredited, and moving to the doctorate level which will also eliminate some schools. Requiring CRNAs to retest may eventually have some effect on total numbers of CRNAS.
  10. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    1. Raise admission requirements - return to the days when everyone had to take real organic chem
    and physics.
    2. Stop accepting online classes for the hard sciences

    I have no doubt that requiring doctorate will price out a lot of students. Not sure it will improve the quality of anesthesia students unless dedicated instructors are used, that is, instructors who are employed by the degree granting institution. Not the fly-by-night " instructors" like me who dreads finding my room set up by a student and I know I am stuck for the day. But so is the poor student
  11. Visit  subee profile page
    2
    Sorry! I have no control of those stupid face emoticons appearing.
    cocoa_puff and ICUman like this.
  12. Visit  calivianya profile page
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    I can't say I think raising requirements will help around here, at least. There are two DNP programs within an hour from me, and they are already fiercely competitive. We don't have any of those distance learning programs in the state - four of the six are state universities, and the two private schools offering CRNA programs currently rank #7 and #11 in the country, so they are not diploma mills by any stretch of the imagination.

    Raising the cost of CRNA school would do the most to weed out people, in my opinion. I could go to almost every CRNA school in my state for around $40k or less, even the DNP ones. Taking out a student loan that I could pay back in less than a year with an aggressive repayment plan in order to double my income is a no brainer.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  13. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    Wow, $40,000 is so cheap it's unimaginable to me. It cost me a lot more than that in the ancient times. But you have 6 programs in one state? What is that doing to salaries with that glut of students?


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