How much do you make? - page 3

by Topher53 | 37,604 Views | 61 Comments

Now, before I get blown up with comments saying "it's not about money, but patient care". I get that. No need to tell me over and over. I heard CRNAs mainly get hired in rural areas, which kind of scares me. I would simply like... Read More


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    IndiCRNA - You are living my dream! Some day (hopefully soon), I'll be in your shoes!
    angieb4gfa and sealford like this.
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    Quote from IndiCRNA
    The answer is "it depends". Most of classmates/friends started at $130K-200K in this area. "this area" being between were we went to school in Minneapolis MN east through Wisconsin since most of us came to MN from Wisconsin for school then restured to Wisconsin (more than half of my class all came from one hospital's SICU and we all knew each other long before NA school). Those who took jobs in the city are making the least, those working in rural area the most. There are two of us, inlcuding me, who belong to all CRNA anethesia practices. I am not an employee but rather 1/3 owner of the practice. We have the exclusive contract to provide anesthesia sevices in a very busy smaller rural hospital, plus contracts to provide on call services for a couple tiny rural hospitals). My net (after taxes, health insurance, capital and interest payments to buy into the practice etc)for my first year will be over $300K. I make considerably less that the two senior partners at this point. We work a 6 week rotating schedual. 2 weeks of Monday-Friday schedualed cases in the OR and covering 2nd call in off hours and weekends (very rare to actually be called in, never happend to me so far). The second two weeks is no schedualed cases at all but on call 24/7. Actually average 21 hours a week of work during the call weeks. Then we are off for two weeks and the schedual repeats. I average slightly over 20 hours of work a week when six weeks of hours are devided by six. We take our call from home.
    It is a fantastic qualiety of life. We are never medicaly directed, we ARE the anesthesia department. Complete autonomy. I love it and highly recomend it. However to work in this enviroment you have to feel confident in your skills since there is no back up as there is with an ACT model.
    You hit the nail right on the head. A friend of mine is a CRNA and a Navy reservist. He works in a rural area in Michigan and it's a CRNA only practice with him and 3 other CRNA's. He also said he makes over $300,000/year. They split the call amongst the 4 of them and they have an exclusive contract with their hospital to provide the anesthesia services. He told me they are very busy and are always looking for help. He even offered me a job when I finish school but rural work is not what I'm looking for. I'm a big city person lol. Maybe could work in the suburbs. My goals is to finish school and work at Baltimore Shock trauma for a couple of years before branching out to areas without the ACT model. My Program Director highly discourages us from working in opt-out states immediately after graduating since we would be totally on our own without backup. The money I must admit does sound good
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    I didn't not know that about rural areas. It goes against conventional wisdom (city = more $) however it makes perfect sense. I live in the rural Midwest (an hour south of KC) and I plan on staying here long term. Sounds like it may end up working out well for me Thanks for the insight.
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    Quote from SRNA4U
    You hit the nail right on the head. A friend of mine is a CRNA and a Navy reservist. He works in a rural area in Michigan and it's a CRNA only practice with him and 3 other CRNA's. He also said he makes over $300,000/year. They split the call amongst the 4 of them and they have an exclusive contract with their hospital to provide the anesthesia services. He told me they are very busy and are always looking for help. He even offered me a job when I finish school but rural work is not what I'm looking for. I'm a big city person lol. Maybe could work in the suburbs. My goals is to finish school and work at Baltimore Shock trauma for a couple of years before branching out to areas without the ACT model. My Program Director highly discourages us from working in opt-out states immediately after graduating since we would be totally on our own without backup. The money I must admit does sound good
    If your PD truly is telling you not to work in opt out states he or she should fired on the spot just for shear stupidity. Opt out has to do with billing for a part of Medicare. There are independent CRNAs all over the US and there are ACT practices in every opt out state. This kinda of sentiment just irks me to no end. CRNAs do not need anesthesiologists to practice safely.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Jan 28, '13
    ICUman, NYCGuy86, PMFB-RN, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from wtbcrna
    If your PD truly is telling you not to work in opt out states he or she should fired on the spot, just for shear stupidity. Opt out has to do with billing for a part of Medicare. The are independent CRNAs all over the US and there are ACT practices in every opt out state. This kinda of sentiment just irks me to no end. CRNAs do not need anesthesiologists to practice safely.
    Agree. Currently doing a clinical rotation in an independent practice rural hospital. Great rotation without MDA supervision/direction. I have the opportunity to finish my clinicals in a different independent practice with CRNAs and MDAs doing their own cases. Excellent experience for an SRNA. I wish every SRNA could get the same experience.
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    It will all depend on where you want to work, or are willing to work. I know here in south Mississippi, some CRNAs can't even find jobs, and those that do have to take far lower salaries than they would like. On the other hand, some NPs are doing well, especially those who have hung their own shingle, or are working in the ER. Hourly rates for NPs in some ERs are up to $75-$80 an hour while others in private practice clinics are making $80,000 per year. The ranges in both professions will be very broad depending on a number of factors.
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    Quote from SRNA4U
    My Program Director highly discourages us from working in opt-out states immediately after graduating since we would be totally on our own without backup. The money I must admit does sound good
    What do you think all the new grads in opt-out states do, move!!! this makes absolutely no sense. If you went to work with the 4 CRNA group, you would have 4 experienced CRNAs for backup. Yes, a new grad will need some advise-but it doesn't have to be a MD. I would argue the best backup is a CRNA who wants you to grow, while MDs in an ACT have an incentive to keep you dependent. Why would they want to promote your indepdence?
    NurseKitten, IndiCRNA, and wtbcrna like this.
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    IndiCRNA
    I am 23 years old and am graduating with my BSN in May 2013. I have attended two Diversity CRNA Mentorship Programs (diversitycrna.org) that I can put in my application essay when I apply for CRNA school. I currently work at a Cardiovascular Step Down Unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital as a Clinical Nurse Extern. I plan to get into SICU when I graduate. I really want to be successful like you and I need more mentors like you that can help me establish myself in the future.
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    I think colorado doesn't pay as much (correct me if i am wrong please) probably due to such a desirable place to live. However, I talked to a crna making 220k working in rural colorado working about 30hrs per week. there is opportunity when you start turning over rocks and getting to know your local market.

    anyone work in Colorado?? would love to hear their thoughts
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    The average CRNA package is around $175,000. I know many in private practice who make twice that amount, but they work very hard for the money.

    Anesthesia is nothing like nursing when it comes to compensation. Administering anesthesia involves a great deal of heavy science education, a lot of clinical skills topped off by stress.

    However, I would never want to do anything else. I love administering anesthesia and being a CRNA.
    bibibi likes this.


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