How much do you make? - page 3

Now, before I get blown up with comments saying "it's not about money, but patient care". I get that. No need to tell me over and over. I heard CRNAs mainly get hired in rural areas, which kind of... Read More

  1. Visit  loveanesthesia profile page
    3
    Quote from SRNA4U
    My Program Director highly discourages us from working in opt-out states immediately after graduating since we would be totally on our own without backup. The money I must admit does sound good
    What do you think all the new grads in opt-out states do, move!!! this makes absolutely no sense. If you went to work with the 4 CRNA group, you would have 4 experienced CRNAs for backup. Yes, a new grad will need some advise-but it doesn't have to be a MD. I would argue the best backup is a CRNA who wants you to grow, while MDs in an ACT have an incentive to keep you dependent. Why would they want to promote your indepdence?
    NurseKitten, IndiCRNA, and wtbcrna like this.
  2. Visit  solomono1222 profile page
    0
    IndiCRNA
    I am 23 years old and am graduating with my BSN in May 2013. I have attended two Diversity CRNA Mentorship Programs (diversitycrna.org) that I can put in my application essay when I apply for CRNA school. I currently work at a Cardiovascular Step Down Unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital as a Clinical Nurse Extern. I plan to get into SICU when I graduate. I really want to be successful like you and I need more mentors like you that can help me establish myself in the future.
  3. Visit  denver nurse profile page
    0
    I think colorado doesn't pay as much (correct me if i am wrong please) probably due to such a desirable place to live. However, I talked to a crna making 220k working in rural colorado working about 30hrs per week. there is opportunity when you start turning over rocks and getting to know your local market.

    anyone work in Colorado?? would love to hear their thoughts
  4. Visit  bread angel profile page
    1
    The average CRNA package is around $175,000. I know many in private practice who make twice that amount, but they work very hard for the money.

    Anesthesia is nothing like nursing when it comes to compensation. Administering anesthesia involves a great deal of heavy science education, a lot of clinical skills topped off by stress.

    However, I would never want to do anything else. I love administering anesthesia and being a CRNA.
    bibibi likes this.
  5. Visit  Topher53 profile page
    0
    And there's really no difference between you and an anesthesiologist, correct?
  6. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Anesthesia is nothing like nursing when it comes to compensation. Administering anesthesia involves a great deal of heavy science education, a lot of clinical skills topped off by stress.
    I would think that not having to deal with residents and interns to get your patient what they need would be less stressful.
  7. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Quote from Topher53
    And there's really no difference between you and an anesthesiologist, correct?
    What a strange thing to say. Yes there are numerous differences between CRNA and MDAs.
    NurseKitten likes this.
  8. Visit  denver nurse profile page
    0
    I am struggling with a few things here. Being a icu nurse in stressful...running a code with an intern that knows less than squat about running a code is stressful. Especially when they are calling out ativan when should be atropine...so many mismanaged meds and its our job to know what should be given. As an icu nurse in a level one trauma, it's on me to make sure my patient still has a heart beat at the end of my shift and to hyper manage that is no easy task...

    So is anesthesia more stressful than that...i don't know yet but i will after school in a a few years. would love to hear others thoughts on this? I know in the OR its just you and sometimes probably little to no back up. I am curious to see what other crnas think when speaking of their stress levels as a icu nurse vs a crna?? please enlighten me
  9. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    10
    The stress is different moving from ICU to a CRNA/provider. No, I don't worry that someone is calling out the wrong medication. There will be surgical residents to work with just as there are residents to work with in the ICU.
    I am the one who has to know every medication that I give frontwards and backwards. It makes undergrad pharmacology look like a joke! When a surgeon accidentally ruptures the spleeen and you are alone as the only anesthesia provider in the hospital giving 16 units of blood products yourself over a couple of hours the pucker factor increases to a level I never had in ICU or ER. I have had two of my otherwise healthy patients heart rate drop in the teens when the surgeon insulflated the abdomen. I have had a high OB epidural after an epidural bolus and the patient's HR and BP dropped to nothing and the patient passed out. I have had 3 codes in the OR so far, and these were all non trauma scheduled surgeries. This doesn't even address the day to day stress of dealing with nurses, surgeons, and techs that comes with being a provider. And just wait until you are trying to do a OB epidural with the patient screaming, cussing, and moving while trying to find the epidural space by the feel of a 3.5 inch touhy needle or you get the 450lb OB pt that wants epidural...
    The job as a CRNA is much more satisfying than any other nursing job I ever had. The autonomy that comes with being a provider and the knowledge that you have to help patients makes it all worth while for me.
    Quote from denver nurse
    I am struggling with a few things here. Being a icu nurse in stressful...running a code with an intern that knows less than squat about running a code is stressful. Especially when they are calling out ativan when should be atropine...so many mismanaged meds and its our job to know what should be given. As an icu nurse in a level one trauma, it's on me to make sure my patient still has a heart beat at the end of my shift and to hyper manage that is no easy task...

    So is anesthesia more stressful than that...i don't know yet but i will after school in a a few years. would love to hear others thoughts on this? I know in the OR its just you and sometimes probably little to no back up. I am curious to see what other crnas think when speaking of their stress levels as a icu nurse vs a crna?? please enlighten me
    jennyxyz, MavrickMan, lunar79, and 7 others like this.
  10. Visit  jakeb profile page
    1
    ^^ very well said... The stress of being an icu nurse is nothing compared to being a crna.
    bibibi likes this.
  11. Visit  denver nurse profile page
    0
    wtbcrna: I believe you for sure...I think i am just burned out and feel like i never really got any respect as a nurse, i know...cry me a river! I think the stress of being an icu nurse for has been more so in being the mediator for doctors, OT, PT, speech, nutrition, x-ray, MRI, cat-scan...you all know what i am talking about right? Just want to get dial in on the patient instead of getting head over heals in charting and paper work. Just gets overwhelming at times which i am sure being a crna does most of time. I am ready for more autonomy and responsibility. I like the idea of being able to call the shots and get out what i put in to the profession.

    Is being in a rural setting more difficult than a hospital setting due to little to no back up? I live in colorado and most inner city jobs are hard to find but lots of rural ones opening up...but not sure if that is a good idea for a new grad? thoughts please?
  12. Visit  NurseKitten profile page
    0
    My guess is the 90K in Florida is around the Gainesville area. Shands starts in the 90's. One of my friends got a job there straight out of school. She says the money stinks, but the experience is fabulous.
  13. Visit  IndiCRNA profile page
    3
    Quote from jakeb
    ^^ very well said... The stress of being an icu nurse is nothing compared to being a crna.
    Respectfully disagree. For me providing anesthesia is far, far less stressful than being an SICU RN. For one thing the vast majority of my patients now are pretty healthy, when I worked in the SICU I pretty much only took care of the worst train wrecks. Also the colabrative relationship I have now with the surgeons is far less stressful than when I was an ICU RN and the sugeons thought I was their Bitc#.
    I also find independant practice in a rural area less stressful then working under the ACT model. Used to drive me crazy to know some MDA was going to get half my bill rate when many times they didn't do any more than stick their head in the door and ask how it was going, if that. Of course they were always there to sign the charting so they could get paid.
    Not having to convince an ignorant intern or resident (with a huge ego) to do the right thing for my patient is priceless. Now what my patient needs they get.
    Nursetonp, ICUman, and WildflowerRN like this.

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