Help: Tattoo Ideas!! - page 2

by SRNA11 38,985 Views | 61 Comments

Okay guys....i just graduated from school and am a real CRNA now. I am very excited and proud to be doing what I'm doing. I was thinking lately of getting a tattoo related to medicine/anesthesia. I need help coming up with... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from jwk
    And I don't think you got the point I was trying to make.

    I met a girl yesterday interested in medical school. She was observing in the OR. She had a large floral tattoo covering the back of her hand and flowing around her wrist - no way to hide it - and VERY noticable from just shaking hands. Like it or not, agree with it or not, admit it or not, she is not going to be taken nearly as seriously as a girl with comparable education and credentials and no visible tattoos.

    I'll give you another example that was the talk of the OR - or at least it was for American Idol fans. The girl with the giant arm tattoos and the husband with the hideous facial tattoos (total idiot). You think those tattoos had anything to do with her not going farther in the competition? Most people I know do.

    I did get the point you were trying to make. Its just that insinuating that people at McDonalds, GM and other such jobs can't be professionals, due to something as trivial as having tattoos,wasn't nice or necessary to the point you were trying to make (IMHO).

    Times are changing. Tattoos are becoming mainstream and more accepted. Employers know this, and with the workforce getting younger, I don't think it'll be a huge deal.

    Its unfortunate that the decision to modify's one's body gives anybody the right to pre-judge them.

    Smurfette752, RunHard, and LfmVigilo like this.
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    How about dandrites wrapped around your arm kinda like the celtic pieces that were very popular a few years ago. Have them touch head (cell body)to tail(axon), you could break the chain to insert a word.
    -Smiley
    NurseKitten likes this.
  3. 2
    Quote from Stanley-RN2B
    Professionals don't get tattoos??? Professionals don't judge people...

    This isn't 1953. Welcome to 2008!!!
    Quote from Crux1024

    Times are changing. Tattoos are becoming mainstream and more accepted. Employers know this, and with the workforce getting younger, I don't think it'll be a huge deal.
    As indicated in my original response to the OP, "you won't like my answer".

    Professionals should look professional. That's why you still see docs wearing coat and tie or white jackets. That's why Yoga, who used to frequent this forum, insisted that the CRNA's working for her wear business attire to work, not jeans or shorts, t-shirts, and flip-flops.

    The OP, SRNA11, has now stepped up a level on the "professional scale", and IMHO, needs to look the part. I'm not saying those that already have tattoos shouldn't be hired - but if you don't have one already, at least think about your appearance to your patients and how that might affect their perception of you.

    When you went for your job interview, didn't you dress up a little? Perception and first impressions are EVERYTHING. When I interview someone, I want to know that the patients in our practice (or the OR staff and surgeons) are not going to be offended or put off by the appearance of one of our anesthetists. If two of you come for an interview at my practice with equal credentials otherwise and pleasant enough personality - one with jeans, polo shirt, big funky looking arm tattoo and nose stud - and the other in coat and tie, who do you think an EMPLOYER might want to hire more? The one who has enough common sense to take the time to LOOK PROFESSIONAL.
    macanes and Qwiigley like this.
  4. 9
    Quote from jwk
    As indicated in my original response to the OP, "you won't like my answer".

    Professionals should look professional. That's why you still see docs wearing coat and tie or white jackets. That's why Yoga, who used to frequent this forum, insisted that the CRNA's working for her wear business attire to work, not jeans or shorts, t-shirts, and flip-flops.

    The OP, SRNA11, has now stepped up a level on the "professional scale", and IMHO, needs to look the part. I'm not saying those that already have tattoos shouldn't be hired - but if you don't have one already, at least think about your appearance to your patients and how that might affect their perception of you.

    When you went for your job interview, didn't you dress up a little? Perception and first impressions are EVERYTHING. When I interview someone, I want to know that the patients in our practice (or the OR staff and surgeons) are not going to be offended or put off by the appearance of one of our anesthetists. If two of you come for an interview at my practice with equal credentials otherwise and pleasant enough personality - one with jeans, polo shirt, big funky looking arm tattoo and nose stud - and the other in coat and tie, who do you think an EMPLOYER might want to hire more? The one who has enough common sense to take the time to LOOK PROFESSIONAL.
    No one said to have a tattoo to cover your face or anything really crazy. I have 4 tattoos. They are pretty big but the one on my neck is clearly visible. No one questions my professionalism or my intelligence. In fact people that do question me before getting to know me solely based on a tattoo are the people with prioblems.

    Society decides what professional means. Notice the dictionary definition is purposely left vague.

    I work at a facility that caters to military people. Now if you have EVER worked in the military you will know that the military has the STRICTEST idea of what professionalism is. Civilians really have no idea. I digress... When I show off my rather large Unit Tattoo no one has a problem. Not staff, family or patients.

    The problem with tattoos is yours alone. There is no standard. Just because Yoga didn't want visible tattoos mean nothing other than that person having a bias.

    The doctor that saved my life had a tattoo from his neck to his arm. It was awesome. I didn't care because hey that tattooed freak saved my life.

    Tattoos aren't a subculture. More people have tattoos than not. Not including children of course. Look around. We outnumber you. Be nice!
    YanMinor, Smurfette752, in2bate71, and 6 others like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from Stanley-RN2B
    No one said to have a tattoo to cover your face or anything really crazy. I have 4 tattoos. They are pretty big but the one on my neck is clearly visible. No one questions my professionalism or my intelligence. In fact people that do question me before getting to know me solely based on a tattoo are the people with prioblems.

    Society decides what professional means. Notice the dictionary definition is purposely left vague.

    I work at a facility that caters to military people. Now if you have EVER worked in the military you will know that the military has the STRICTEST idea of what professionalism is. Civilians really have no idea. I digress... When I show off my rather large Unit Tattoo no one has a problem. Not staff, family or patients.

    The problem with tattoos is yours alone. There is no standard. Just because Yoga didn't want visible tattoos mean nothing other than that person having a bias.

    The doctor that saved my life had a tattoo from his neck to his arm. It was awesome. I didn't care because hey that tattooed freak saved my life.

    Tattoos aren't a subculture. More people have tattoos than not. Not including children of course. Look around. We outnumber you. Be nice!
    Tattoos in a military setting are a tad different. Apples to oranges. Private practice is a different thing altogether.

    More people have tattoos than not? I doubt it.
    macanes likes this.
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    I understand what jwk is trying to say. And it does make sense. But I don't entirely agree. As long as you aren't going to tattoo it on your forehead I would go ahead and do it.

    What is your most dominent nationality? Maybe you could get one in that language. I am about 75% Italian so I would put it in that language.
  7. 2
    a guy in my class designed me the tattoo i am going to get when i graduate nursing school in october. its a florence nightengale lamp with a butterfly coming out of it. its beautiful and it is representing my transformation from paramedic to nurse.

    and whoever said professionals dont get tattoos, professionals dont judge others. you do what you like to your body, and i'll do the same to mine. thanks.
    Smurfette752 and Valerie Salva like this.
  8. 2
    Quote from jwk

    Professionals don't get tattoos.
    *** Where I work I can think of 5 or 6 surgeons and one MDA right off the top of my head who have tattoos that are visible when they are wearing scrubs. So much for that.
    Smurfette752 and LfmVigilo like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from jwk
    Tattoos in a military setting are a tad different. Apples to oranges. Private practice is a different thing altogether.

    More people have tattoos than not? I doubt it.
    You have to get permission to get a tattoo and you have very strict rules about where you can get them.

    Corporate culture originated in the military...

    Start asking people at your workplace. More than not under 40 will have one... The military is also the most conservative...
  10. 0
    Quote from Stanley-RN2B
    You have to get permission to get a tattoo and you have very strict rules about where you can get them.....

    That is HILARIOUS!

    I frequently work with Special Forces medics, almost every one of whom displays NUMEROUS large tatts. And they regularly add to their collection.

    Don't need no steeenkin permission.


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