CRNA's in Hawaii - page 2

Hey guys..I was just looking for some information regarding CRNA's in Hawaii. Once done with school I really want to go back and live in that glorious environment. Does anyone out there know about... Read More

  1. by   zenman
    Posted by susanna: Is it like a big risk to mortgage a house and then have a tsunimi come over and eat your whole house and the whole island? Or a volcano iruption? Otherwise, even if property is expensive, there's always mortgaging and then paying it off until you die.
    I don't think there is any problem selling a house here. It just might not be what you're used to. My $275k house in Texas would go for over a million here. No volcanos on Oahu. They are on the Big Island. Land is cheaper there!! I got a new video camera ready for whenever the big storm or wave comes!
  2. by   RedBait
    First: The best money in Hawaii (in Nursing, anyway) is to be made working for the Federal Gov, on Oahu. That would be Tripler Army Med Center, Schofield Clinic, etc. Because: in addition to the highest prevailing wage (which is what Uncle pays everywhere), there is a cost of living allowance of 25% of base, which is federal tax FREE. Go to the Civilian Personal Online website and find out more about job vacancies and benefits all around the world.
    Second: The cost of living here (called by us transplants, "Paradise Tax") can be eased a bit at Costco, Sam's, and the myriad of farmers' markets. Traffic sucks, but I come from Chicago where traffic sucks 20-22 hours a day, 7 days a week, both directions.
    Third: The health care is not so bad as previously described in this thread. The Queen's is not the only game on these islands. I come from a large university hospital experience and there is nothing like that here...nothing. But, besides Queen's, there are Straub, Kapiolani, Pali Momi, Castle,Tripler, Kaiser, St Francis Liliha, Maui Memorial on Maui (these are the ones I have worked at when I did per diem, there are other hospitals, as well that I can't vouch for)...all have full services: lots of docs that are specialty boarded, X-rays, labs, MRI, gamma knife, ICU, dialysis...rather a lot for tiny state with 1.2 million people that is in the middle of the Pacific, 4000 miles from the nearest landmass.
    Last, but not least: We have perpetual Summer. flowers on the trees, double rainbows, waterfalls (don't swim there, leptospirosis!), the awe inspiring Pacific Ocean, the best vistas this side of Heaven, to name my favorites. But, Hawaii is not for everyone, no place is...
  3. by   Audreyfay
    I was there for 6 months and was ready to leave. I was on Oahu. Being a visitor was a lot different than being a local. The other thing I just could not get over in health care was the racism against "haoli's," (whites). I will visit Hawaii again as a tourist, but I will stay away from Oahu.
  4. by   zenman
    Posted by Redbait: The health care is not so bad as previously described in this thread.
    I guess it's what you are used to. I thought it strange that in the one month before I left Texas, 3 people from Hawaii came to a small hospital north of Austin to have knee replacement surgery in our 15 bed rehab unit. I'm definitely not impressed with the healthcare here and so are none of the mainland travelers I have talked to. Nurses (the ones I worked with) coming over from the mainland during the strike were not impressed either. I will admit that this is a union state and the first experience I have with nursing unions. They do foster a certain breed of people. I've only worked in one hospital but talk with physicians and nurses who have worked all over. One physician told me that there is very little world class medicine here. Many physicians are not impressed with nursing care which is a shame. I did chill out and quit complaining so much when one of the local girls I work with told me, "Well, Randy, you have to remember this is a third world country!" That was so good! I guess when your educational system is near the bottom there has to be a ripple effect. This is the country, I mean state where mongooses were imported to control rats. However mongooses are out during the day and rats at night so they never meet! I mentioned earlier about money alloted for the fancy new library in Kapolei and they forgot about asking for money for books! Or that really big golf resort halfway up a mountain here that was built then abandoned because no one thought about the impossibility of getting water to it! Really funny, but pitiful. I really haven't run into much racism here but I have a sense of humor and get along with most people. That's the key here. Don't come off as a mainlander knowing more that the locals, even though you know 150 ways to do it better!
    About 20% of the people here are mixed race. 62% of Oahu is Asian. I've heard that most of the racism is directed at other Asians instead of whites. Hawaii is also very unfriendly to business. You can be happy in a lot of places but it helps to know as much as possible beforehand.
  5. by   JSB
    I lived in Hawaii for 4 yrs, and really loved it. The lifestyle is definitely slower paced than what we are used to on the "mainland", and is sometimes inconvenient, but I got used to it. You have to kind of lower your expectations for efficiency. So many people see Waikiki and Honolulu and think they've experienced Oahu. I lived on the North Shore - it's very different from town. Of course, this was about 10 years ago, and things are probably different now. We could hop a puddle-jumper to the other islands for $39 then, so you could "get away" for cheap. There's even skiing and snowboarding on the Big Island. I got 3rd place in a snowboarding competition the very first time I was on a snowboard! There is a type of reverse racism towards white people (haoles), but I believe this was felt less in the professional world. I am half Indian, and with my darker skin I was often mistaken for a local, so I did not experience any of this racism. Probably a lot of that could be diverted by just simple respect for the locals and their culture and way of life. The aloha spirit you hear about is very real. True, you are thousands of miles away from your family when you are a non-native living in Hawaii, but I had several "adoptive" families there who treated me like their own. Cost is somewhat prohibitive - you won't be able to live at the same standards as you do here with the same amount of money, but then you may not need to. Wh spend a ton of money for a fancy house when you'l spend so much time outside anyway? I rarely spent a lot of money on entertainment - the ocean is free, and a surfboard is entertainment enough. There were many bonfires on the beach, and we would just go out at night and play guitars together for fun. To me, this seems like a much healthier way of life than sitting at home watching TV. Everything is just more natural. We left Hawaii when I was pregnant with my first child. We wanted our children to know their family, and get a good education. The school system in Hawaii was pretty terrible as far as mainland standards go, and even if we could have afforded private school, they weren't that good either. (Maybe homeschooling would work for some of you?) The locals often speak a dialect called "pigeon", which they can "turn off" when speaking professionally, but there are some who cannot really speak in proper English. All in all, I would love to go back, but the children are still young, and I am really enjoying being near my family again. I still have good friends there that I keep in touch with, and I can listen to a "Bruddah Iz" CD and be transported back instantly. I wouldn't trade the experience for the world. If you are thinking of visiting, there is a special on roundtrip airfare through American Airlines. Round trip to Honolulu is $350, and to Maui is $450. Let me tell you, this is dirt cheap. The only problem I had was finding available dates to travel - many are already sold out, but the prices are good until April 2005. If yo can, GO! You'll never forget the beauty and wonder that is Hawaii.
  6. by   kdst
    I have lived on oahu since 1981, went to nursing schools (2) here, (rotated in most hospitals during school) and have worked at Queen's for 11 years. (Kaiser too, as a call-in). I've also raised 2 kids here and agree that most public schools are in disrepair and lack proper funding. There are fabulous private schools here, but be prepared to shell out the dough to the tune of 10-12,000/year. It was worth every last cent. I can't compare Nursing here to the mainland because I haven't made it there yet. That will change soon as I am headed to LA to CRNA school next month. However, I disagree that medicine is "like a third world country" here and am proud to say I have the utmost respect for my nursing and physician colleagues. I count many of them among my best friends and have seen incredible selfless dedication in these people. The outer islands do lack many medical services and people do have to fly to oahu for specialized treatment. We also serve the entire pacific rim. There is a thriving community of CRNA's here. I think the pay is slightly less here than the mainland but not horribly so. I didn't love it from the day I moved here, it happened over time but I feel the exposure to many different cultures is enriching and fun. Hope this helps!
  7. by   maturner
    kdst, Where have you been? I was hoping you would show.

    I just returned from a vacation and see that other people spoke on the downside to island life. The upside speaks for itself especially, if you are a waterman (or woman) such as myself but the flip side of the coin is just as real and should be taken into consideration. I was in the airport yesterday and the Hawaiian Air gates were next to mine and it was all I could do to keep myself from jumping flights and going to a houkilau.
  8. by   kdst
    you are so right there are always 2 sides maturner. but we are done with it and the bs and are moving on. i just bet you are laughing. Am i right charcoal king?
    Last edit by kdst on Jul 1, '04
  9. by   maturner
    kdst, right on sistah! much less da kine! Well at the very least the new da kine will be mo' bettah.
  10. by   Diprivan/Vented
    I don't understand why anyone would want to live in Hawaii. Yeah, it's got nice beaches and it's a nice place to relax, but that's all! And the women there are so-so. When I went to visit there, all the gorgeous ladies I talked to wound up being from California or Texas. Don't get me wrong. Hawaii is a great place to visit, but to live? Nah. I'd rather take California by a long shot. Californians is metropolitan, the night life is fantastic, the scenery is breath-taking, and the women are out of this world. Texas is a close second. But then again, you can't really touch New York City.
  11. by   RedBait
    Quote from Diprivan/Vented
    I don't understand why anyone would want to live in Hawaii. Yeah, it's got nice beaches and it's a nice place to relax, but that's all! And the women there are so-so. When I went to visit there, all the gorgeous ladies I talked to wound up being from California or Texas. Don't get me wrong. Hawaii is a great place to visit, but to live? Nah. I'd rather take California by a long shot. Californians is metropolitan, the night life is fantastic, the scenery is breath-taking, and the women are out of this world. Texas is a close second. But then again, you can't really touch New York City.
    Yeah, please stay away, yeah, we don't like you either, yeah!
  12. by   zenman
    Originally Posted by Diprivan/Vented
    I don't understand why anyone would want to live in Hawaii. Yeah, it's got nice beaches and it's a nice place to relax, but that's all! And the women there are so-so. When I went to visit there, all the gorgeous ladies I talked to wound up being from California or Texas. Don't get me wrong. Hawaii is a great place to visit, but to live? Nah. I'd rather take California by a long shot. Californians is metropolitan, the night life is fantastic, the scenery is breath-taking, and the women are out of this world. Texas is a close second. But then again, you can't really touch New York City.
    Honolulu has some night life but everything else shuts down at sunset. New York...way too cold for my bones!
  13. by   susanna
    Quote from Diprivan/Vented
    I don't understand why anyone would want to live in Hawaii. Yeah, it's got nice beaches and it's a nice place to relax, but that's all!
    HELLO! Four words...Land o Eternal Sunshine!

    Nice beaches? A nice place to relax? And thats all? Hell yeah, thats all! Thats good enough for me.

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