Become A Nurse Just To Be A Crna? - page 5

Does Anyone Think It Is Wrong To Want To Be An Rn Just So That They Could Be A Crna? Although The Clinical Experience In Icu Is Priceless.... Read More

  1. by   tridil2000
    Quote from ICUsleep
    Yes, the clinical experience in ICU is priceless....also required to even enter a CRNA program.
    my next door neighbor is going for her crna right now. she has 10 years er experience and she's getting slammed by the icu nurses. they know so much already. she says it's obvious that they know their stuff. i think the situation is upsetting her.

    for example, she was asked to set up an a line, and she had no clue how to do it . an icu nurse did it in a flash and that left her looking stupid. additionally, she was asked to titrate neo and couldn't figure out the drip rate without looking it up.

    needless to say, she's finding it very difficult bc she looks like she's clueless half the time.

    op, don't rush through. take the time to learn things. experience is a tough teacher. it gives the test first and the lessons later. you'll want to know what you're doing, and so will the patients, that come under your care.

    good luck!
  2. by   tridil2000
    Quote from lookingtobecrna
    you know I totally understand the above posts. Since everyone is so against the minumum 1 year critical care experience what about some grads who are admitted to crna programs with the minumum 1 year experience. Are any one of u insinuating that a nurse with the minumum critical care experience would not be successful as a CRNA? Im just curious im just trying to understand.
    being a critical care nurse for 18 years in ers, icus and ccus, as well as being an acls instructor, my reply, and my professional opinion to your question, is no.

    no, i do not think that 1 year, even in critical care, is enough to truly be a good crna.

    who would you choose to put you under? someone with all my experience as a crna or someone with the minimum?

    i hope you expect your surgeon to have had more than 1 year of experience before opening you.

    expecting nurses to be held to higher standards only helps us reach our full potentials. if we accept lower standards, then we'll get lower results. it has nothing to do with going on..... it has to do with knowing, as a profession, we approve and send our best into these programs so we ALL look like winners in the end.

    trish rn bsn cen (recert ccrn in april)
  3. by   fallonrn
    What do they call the person who finished last in medical school?






    Doctor!!!

    nuff said
  4. by   mwbeah
    You have to get accepted and finish first (don't forget that part)
  5. by   lookingtobecrna
    What about anesthesiologist who put people under during their residency are they incompetent? The last time i checked at least here in nyc they run the show. these residents learn by example and theory so,,,,,,,,
  6. by   ICUsleep
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Nobody is knocking potential longterm goals...we all should have them. I just happen to think the primary goal should be first learning how to be a NURSE, then a competent CRITICAL CARE NURSE before moving into another specialty. JMHO.
    The primary goal HAS to be becoming a nurse...it isn't an option.
    I HAVE TO (and WANT TO) become an RN before I can work in ICU, and I HAVE TO (and WANT TO) work in ICU before I can go into any CRNA program.
    If there are nurses who somehow graduate from nursing school and spend a year in critical care without having learned anything about being a nurse or critical care nurse, I doubt very seriously they would be accepted into any CRNA program.
    I'm a beginner, so I have lots of goals. First one is to graduate school, pass
    N-CLEX, land a job, etc., but I can say with all honesty that it is the long term goal, the big picture, that keeps me motivated and keeps me going on those days when my world is falling apart and I find myself asking, " Why am I here wiping someone's butt"? And, no, I am NOT NOT NOT saying that is all nurses do. I'm saying that is what I am doing as a student.:chuckle
  7. by   NGACRNA
    Remember to not let all the nursing instructors and clinical preceptors know you are there to be a CRNA. Unfortunately, many nurses don't think we are "real" nurses anymore. And many have "laryngoscope envy", a term coined by a former CRNA Professor at MCG (sorry Prof K, I had to use your line!). Speaking of CRNA schools, those that are in Schools of Nursing often find that their students tend to get the shaft from some (not ALL) of the other nursing faculty.

    So sometimes you have to act all "touchy-feely" to get through the morass and into the ICU.

    Just some thoughts from one who's been there.
  8. by   ICUsleep
    Quote from NGACRNA
    Remember to not let all the nursing instructors and clinical preceptors know you are there to be a CRNA. Unfortunately, many nurses don't think we are "real" nurses anymore. And many have "laryngoscope envy", a term coined by a former CRNA Professor at MCG (sorry Prof K, I had to use your line!). Speaking of CRNA schools, those that are in Schools of Nursing often find that their students tend to get the shaft from some (not ALL) of the other nursing faculty.

    So sometimes you have to act all "touchy-feely" to get through the morass and into the ICU.

    Just some thoughts from one who's been there.
    Yeah. I have noticed some of that....I don't tell most instructors that I plan to go into Anesthetism unless they specifically ask about long-term goals...and even then it depends on the type of nurse/instructor that person is. I think it rubs some instructors the wrong way...and some students probably do have some attitude...like "why should I care about this, I'm going to be a CRNA!" I would never say anything like that. I am there to learn as much as possible, just like everyone else.
  9. by   USFguy
    I am a BSN student at University of San Francisco (USF) and I have plans to become a Nurse Anesthetist, but understand that I must first learn the skills and art of nursing at the bedside (ICU, CCU, Med-Surg. etc.) before even thinking about anesthesia. I disagree with the other post about keeping your ambitions about anesthesia a secret to your nursing professors and employers. My nursing professors are very supportive and encourage all the students to move into some advanded practice role (NP, CRNA, CNM, CNS) or obtain further graduate education in Nurse Adminisration, Informatics, etc. (i.e. MS in Healthcare Sydtems Management). I know of Columbia ETP program and there are many others around the country for other APN roles such as NP or CNS, like at UCSF here in San Francisco. I think this is just another way for schools to deal with the nurse shortage and it is attractive to students that don't want to deal with the stigma of "just being a nurse." That is unfortuantate and is a unforseeable consequesnce of these programs. I had a MEO (Master's Entry Option Grad...had a BS in Psychology and then went straight to becoming a Pych NP) instructor who had very little respect for bedsise nurses (ADN or BSN) and saw herself as superior. That's kind of like "biting the hand that feeds you" to me. If it weren't for bedside nursing, our roles wouldn't even exist! That is our base, our foundation. That is how CRNA programs are oriented, on the nursing model. If you want to do this ETP at Columbia, I say go for it, but just remember you will always be a nurse! I don't care how much you get paid!
  10. by   USFguy
    Quote from USFguy
    I am a BSN student at University of San Francisco (USF) and I have plans to become a Nurse Anesthetist, but understand that I must first learn the skills and art of nursing at the bedside (ICU, CCU, Med-Surg. etc.) before even thinking about anesthesia. I disagree with the other post about keeping your ambitions about anesthesia a secret to your nursing professors and employers. My nursing professors are very supportive and encourage all the students to move into some advanded practice role (NP, CRNA, CNM, CNS) or obtain further graduate education in Nurse Adminisration, Informatics, etc. (i.e. MS in Healthcare Sydtems Management). I know of Columbia ETP program and there are many others around the country for other APN roles such as NP or CNS, like at UCSF here in San Francisco. I think this is just another way for schools to deal with the nurse shortage and it is attractive to students that don't want to deal with the stigma of "just being a nurse." That is unfortuantate and is a unforseeable consequesnce of these programs. I had a MEO (Master's Entry Option Grad...had a BS in Psychology and then went straight to becoming a Pych NP) instructor who had very little respect for bedsise nurses (ADN or BSN) and saw herself as superior. That's kind of like "biting the hand that feeds you" to me. If it weren't for bedside nursing, our roles wouldn't even exist! That is our base, our foundation. That is how CRNA programs are oriented, on the nursing model. If you want to do this ETP at Columbia, I say go for it, but just remember you will always be a nurse! I don't care how much you get paid!

    By the way, anyone know how hard it is to get into Columbia's program? I am a second semester sophmore graduating in 2007, so I have a ways. I really want to move to NYC and go to Columbia. What kind of GPA do they want and course work. It looks like they basically require the same courses a pre-med student needs (i.e. Chem, Physics, Calculus, etc.). If anyone who goes there or did , can you respond?

    Also, I wonder is there CRNA program is conveting over to the DrNP degree or not since they just got that degree approved. Anyone?
  11. by   mwbeah
    Hey Lookingtobecrna,You never did tell us how your information seeking at Columbia went???????
    Last edit by mwbeah on Feb 13, '05
  12. by   iliket3
    Nothing wrong with going into nursing to become a CRNA. However, with that being said, I begin my first ICU job in June. Knowing myself the way I do , I will not apply for NA school until I feel a certain level of comfort in my ability and skills as an RN. Time is not on my side. I'm older and want to be a CRNA within the next 5 years or so. That means I do not have the time to hang out on med-surg before going to ICU just to "perfect my skills as an RN." Don't mean to offend anyone but that's just plain the way it is. And not to be stubborn - but I don't see a single thing wrong with it.
  13. by   ICUsleep
    Quote from iliket3
    I will not apply for NA school until I feel a certain level of comfort in my ability and skills as an RN. Time is not on my side. I'm older and want to be a CRNA within the next 5 years or so. That means I do not have the time to hang out on med-surg before going to ICU just to "perfect my skills as an RN." Don't mean to offend anyone but that's just plain the way it is. And not to be stubborn - but I don't see a single thing wrong with it.
    I agree with you 100%. You will need to conserve more energy (and time!) for going to CRNA school and learning about the procedures you will actually be performing than to spending it working med-surg. There is nothing wrong with what you feel and plan to do. Working years on med-surg isn't what will get you into CRNA school anyways...they want to see if and how much ICU experience you have. Good luck!

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