Become A Nurse Just To Be A Crna?

Specialties CRNA

Published

You are reading page 5 of Become A Nurse Just To Be A Crna?

ayndim

462 Posts

you know I totally understand the above posts. Since everyone is so against the minumum 1 year critical care experience what about some grads who are admitted to crna programs with the minumum 1 year experience. Are any one of u insinuating that a nurse with the minumum critical care experience would not be successful as a CRNA? Im just curious im just trying to understand.

From what I understand the minimum of 1 year is sufficient. The only problem I would have is if they didn't have the experience (unlikely since it is required by AANA) or if they didn't use that time to learn what they needed to and to become competent nurse.

forane2001

21 Posts

What about CRNA's that are told they are "just a nurse". How would that make you feel. One day I had my wallet out looking for a note that I had written and one of the scrubs in the room said "There is nothing in there, your just a nurse!" I promptly told her that I was so glad she was an expert on my financial situation and that I would take my check over hers anyday. So the just a nurse statement goes both ways. CRNA's are not just nurses. Thats a fact. All CRNA's are registered nurses, but not all registered nurses are CRNA's. You will never understand the profession of nurse anesthesia until you have walked the walk.

Just remember that we 'just a nurse's' may get a little peeved if we are treated like steppingstones for 'bigger and better things', particularly when we are assigned as preceptors. Just a FYI. ;)

oh i see good point u should learn the skills necessary in order to offer the patient the best healthcare possible. thanks for all the positive advice and encouragement.

forane2001

21 Posts

It takes the right caliber person to be a CRNA. The requirements may say min of 1 year but most have several years experience. Admissions is tough. No cakewalk and it may take more that one application. Its a whole different world. NO comparsion to staff nursing, I dont care what the law or anyone else says, it is totally different- For instance practicing the full scope of anesthesia by yourself!!! You are it. Manage all the complications-Being responsible for every drug you give and its ramifications. Securing the airway before they desaturate or aspirate! If you cant- they are probably dead and you are going to court!! Sorry but CRNA's are not just nurses!!! How about being the only CRNA in a forward military MASH unit? No backup. During the first part of Iraqi freedom there were about 360 CRNA's deployed compared to 77 MDA's. Not to be arrogant or belittling. I am respectful of all those around me and I appreciate everyones job I just want people to respect and appreciate the CRNA especially since they have no clue as to what we do. Sorry, but please dont ever refer to me as "just a nurse" And yes I went through nursing "JUST TO BE A CRNA!!!!!!!! I planned it before I even graduated high school. I had 3 yrs of EMS before I finished high school and continue that until I finished my nursing and had to go off to CRNA school. I was a cardiac technician with ACLS by age 17. So I think being a CRNA takes a special, dedicated person. just my .02c

Yes, the clinical experience in ICU is priceless....also required to even enter a CRNA program.:rolleyes:

my next door neighbor is going for her crna right now. she has 10 years er experience and she's getting slammed by the icu nurses. they know so much already. she says it's obvious that they know their stuff. i think the situation is upsetting her.

for example, she was asked to set up an a line, and she had no clue how to do it:uhoh3: . an icu nurse did it in a flash and that left her looking stupid. additionally, she was asked to titrate neo and couldn't figure out the drip rate without looking it up.:rolleyes:

needless to say, she's finding it very difficult bc she looks like she's clueless half the time.

op, don't rush through. take the time to learn things. experience is a tough teacher. it gives the test first and the lessons later. you'll want to know what you're doing, and so will the patients, that come under your care.

good luck!

you know I totally understand the above posts. Since everyone is so against the minumum 1 year critical care experience what about some grads who are admitted to crna programs with the minumum 1 year experience. Are any one of u insinuating that a nurse with the minumum critical care experience would not be successful as a CRNA? Im just curious im just trying to understand.

being a critical care nurse for 18 years in ers, icus and ccus, as well as being an acls instructor, my reply, and my professional opinion to your question, is no.

no, i do not think that 1 year, even in critical care, is enough to truly be a good crna.

who would you choose to put you under? someone with all my experience as a crna or someone with the minimum?

i hope you expect your surgeon to have had more than 1 year of experience before opening you.

expecting nurses to be held to higher standards only helps us reach our full potentials. if we accept lower standards, then we'll get lower results. it has nothing to do with going on..... it has to do with knowing, as a profession, we approve and send our best into these programs so we ALL look like winners in the end.:)

trish rn bsn cen (recert ccrn in april)

jacads

80 Posts

What do they call the person who finished last in medical school?

Doctor!!!

nuff said

mwbeah

430 Posts

You have to get accepted and finish first (don't forget that part)

What about anesthesiologist who put people under during their residency are they incompetent? The last time i checked at least here in nyc they run the show. these residents learn by example and theory so,,,,,,,,

ICUsleep

43 Posts

Nobody is knocking potential longterm goals...we all should have them. I just happen to think the primary goal should be first learning how to be a NURSE, then a competent CRITICAL CARE NURSE before moving into another specialty. JMHO.

The primary goal HAS to be becoming a nurse...it isn't an option.:)

I HAVE TO (and WANT TO) become an RN before I can work in ICU, and I HAVE TO (and WANT TO) work in ICU before I can go into any CRNA program.

If there are nurses who somehow graduate from nursing school and spend a year in critical care without having learned anything about being a nurse or critical care nurse, I doubt very seriously they would be accepted into any CRNA program.

I'm a beginner, so I have lots of goals. First one is to graduate school, pass

N-CLEX, land a job, etc., but I can say with all honesty that it is the long term goal, the big picture, that keeps me motivated and keeps me going on those days when my world is falling apart and I find myself asking, " Why am I here wiping someone's butt"? And, no, I am NOT NOT NOT saying that is all nurses do. I'm saying that is what I am doing as a student.:chuckle

NGACRNA

27 Posts

Remember to not let all the nursing instructors and clinical preceptors know you are there to be a CRNA. Unfortunately, many nurses don't think we are "real" nurses anymore. And many have "laryngoscope envy", a term coined by a former CRNA Professor at MCG (sorry Prof K, I had to use your line!). Speaking of CRNA schools, those that are in Schools of Nursing often find that their students tend to get the shaft from some (not ALL) of the other nursing faculty.

So sometimes you have to act all "touchy-feely" to get through the morass and into the ICU.

Just some thoughts from one who's been there.

ICUsleep

43 Posts

Remember to not let all the nursing instructors and clinical preceptors know you are there to be a CRNA. Unfortunately, many nurses don't think we are "real" nurses anymore. And many have "laryngoscope envy", a term coined by a former CRNA Professor at MCG (sorry Prof K, I had to use your line!). Speaking of CRNA schools, those that are in Schools of Nursing often find that their students tend to get the shaft from some (not ALL) of the other nursing faculty.

So sometimes you have to act all "touchy-feely" to get through the morass and into the ICU.

Just some thoughts from one who's been there.

Yeah. I have noticed some of that....I don't tell most instructors that I plan to go into Anesthetism unless they specifically ask about long-term goals...and even then it depends on the type of nurse/instructor that person is. I think it rubs some instructors the wrong way...and some students probably do have some attitude...like "why should I care about this, I'm going to be a CRNA!" I would never say anything like that. I am there to learn as much as possible, just like everyone else.

:nurse:

+ Add a Comment

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X