Considering Georgetown online

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    I haven't really picked through the old threads yet (I probably should have done that first, huh?) but I was wondering if any of you has done Georgetown's online midwifery program? It's so close to me, and I'm thinking life could be so much easier with Georgetown than with Frontier, which is where I've been planning on going all of this time. However, I'm concerned that Georgetown's number of credits required is 49. That seems a lot less than other programs. Plus it's done in 18 months for full time students. Is this a full program that results in the ability to become a CNM? If so, there has to be some catch, right? Sounds too good to be true.
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    Georgetown's on-line programs (ie CNM, FNP, etc) are all brand new and the first on-line class will be the Fall '11 class. Up until now Georgetown has only had on campus classes.
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    I guess that's why I never noticed them before! I guess that could be good news OR bad news, huh? I can't seem to find any information on their tuition except that they're really pricey. Do you have any idea what the ballpark might be?
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    Ixchel, did you have any success getting additional info? I looked into this as well, but couldn't get any answers from my "adviser". She never emailed me, although I told her I'd prefer communication by email due to a crazy schedule. I emailed her questions and never got a response. She called several times when I was unavailable. This past time, I got an email saying "Sorry you are no longer interested". Ugh!
    I didn't know if this program is ALL online, or if you are required to do X amount of clinical hours locally.
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    I spoke with a representative today. All courses are offered online and there is 650 hours of clinicals needed at a facility near where you live. i think its around 72000.
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    Quote from allisa07
    I spoke with a representative today. All courses are offered online and there is 650 hours of clinicals needed at a facility near where you live. i think its around 72000.
    I'm seriously considering it; but the tuition cost has really got me stalling. $73,815 is what they quoted me as the total cost without travel yesterday. That's 4 times the amount of one of the local universities here. It would be a nice vacation for the 2 sessions that require campus visits.

    I am trying to find out more about the tuition reimbursement (LOAN FORGIVENESS) offered by government for working in rural health areas or by Americorps. On one of the emails, the "fine print" says they will only forgive loans after you've made 120 consecutive payments. That's like 10 years! Right?
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    Yes, that's about 10 years! And who knows how much each monthly payment will be!
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    Thank you so much for the feedback! I hate the price tag of this school, but it's actually driving distance from me (not for face to face classes, but for the on campus visits we would have-- I live 2.5 hours away) and I love the reputation that Georgetown has in general. After putting more reflection and research into it, I've decided Georgetown is my first choice school. I'm hoping I can manage to keep my 3.9 for the next couple of years and qualify for some money for school. *fingers crossed*

    ETA: I just did the math and 650 hours is less than 10 hours a week on the full time program. That's actually really good news! I may be working during grad school, so I was really scared that my clinicals requirement was going to make it impossible to study at the same time.
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    regarding loan payment -- there are many different programs for loan repayment. one involves total forgiveness of loans if you've done 120 consecutive payments AND worked for 10 yrs (get it?) in public service of some kind. but if you check out the options on the national health service corps website (NHSC, which is affiliated with HRSA), there are jobs listed where for two years of work at an approved site, you get $60,000 of loan forgiveness (federal or private bank loans), with additional awards for sequential years.

    there are other options, but the NHSC one is the most commonly discussed option (i say discussed cause i'm currently racking up all of my debt at OHSU in the CNM program, so i just hear the discussion amongst students -- not amongst ppl who are repaying debt yet... what am i even doing?! oh right, living my dream, haha! YES! that's it!)

    on top of those two options, there's becoming an NHSC scholar at the start of your program -- you apply for their scholarship program, get accepted (hopefully!), they pay your tuition AND give you a stipend for living/books. then you owe them two years of your time working in an underserved area. downside is that i hear (hearsay! this is hearsay!) that a lot of the CNM NHSC jobs are doing more well-woman care, fewer deliveries, AND that there aren't a lot of 'scholar' positions even available once you finish your program -- so you might not have too much autonomy in where you end up (have to take what's available, which might not be too many positions).

    anyway, that's what i've heard. haven't applied for anything yet though so i haven't been talking to the actual agency -- just other students. but there is hope, if you look hard enough!!! good luck with your applications!


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